Tag Archives: Theatre Royal

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Backstage photo tour of Glasgow’s Theatre Royal

Here is a glimpse behind the scenes of Glasgow’s oldest and Scotland’s longest-running theatre, the Theatre Royal.

Originally opening as the Royal Colosseum & Opera House in 1867, the theatre changed its name in 1869 on receiving its royal charter (and confirmation of respectability) from Queen Victoria.

Literally hewn from the stone quarry below, it has survived multiple fires, changes of ownership and a stint as the headquarters of Scottish Television and now stands resplendent on the corner of Hope Street and Cowcaddens Road, its Victorian auditorium restored to its full glory and its 2014 extension shining like a splendid jewel. Home to Scottish Opera and Scottish Ballet the grande dame of Scottish theatre is better than it has ever been in its near-150 year life.

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The new foyer and staircase designed by Page and Park and opened during the 2014 festive season.

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NEWS: OPERA IN CONCERT 2018/19 OPENS WITH SCOTTISH PREMIERE OF PUCCINI’S EDGAR AT THEATRE ROYAL GLASGOW

Scottish Opera’s 2018/19 Opera in Concert series opens with the Scottish premiere of Edgar by Giacomo Puccini on Sunday 28 October, at Theatre Royal Glasgow.

A gem from the world of verismo opera, Puccini’s rarely-performed second opera was commissioned following the success of Le villi, which was performed as part of Scottish Opera’s 2016/17 Opera in Concert programme.

Italian conductor Gianluca Marcianò leads a cast that features soloists Peter Auty (Eugene Onegin 2018), Justina Gringyte (Carmen 2015), Claire Rutter (L’enfant prodigue 2016), David Stout (La bohème 2017) and Richard Wiegold (Madama Butterfly 2007). They are joined by a chorus, which includes members of Scottish Opera Young Company, and The Orchestra of Scottish Opera. This semi-staged performance is directed by Roxana Haines.

Edgar tells the story of an impulsive young knight who runs off with the seductive gypsy Tigrana. Edgar eventually tires of their indulgent life and fakes his own death, but Tigrana soon takes her revenge. Despite the dark themes of murder and vengeance, Puccini’s score is one of remarkable lyricism, lush harmonies and rich orchestral colouring, clearly heralding the later genius of both Madama Butterfly and Tosca.

Scottish Opera Music Director Stuart Stratford said: ‘I’m thrilled that we’re performing Edgar, Puccini’s second opera, following on from the success of Le villi last year. It has all the elements you’d expect from a Puccini opera – amazing melodies and beautiful harmonies. It’s not a tug of war, it’s a tug of love; the sacred love of Fidelia and the profane love of Tigrana. It’s a wonderful opportunity to share a forgotten masterpiece. Puccini famously didn’t want it to be staged in his lifetime. We’re doing it in concert, with semi-staging, which is a lovely way to experience the piece.’

The Opera in Concert series continues in April 2019 with the long-overdue Scottish premiere of Mascagni’s Silvano, a passionate seafaring story whose hard-hitting drama is reminiscent of the composer’s celebrated Cavalleria rusticana. Conducted by Stuart Stratford, Silvano tells the tale of a love triangle that ends in death and despair, and includes the Barcarolle famously featured in Scorsese’s Raging Bull. It is performed in City Halls, Glasgow and at the Usher Hall, Edinburgh with soloists including acclaimed soprano Emma Bell as Matilde, Alexey Dolgov (Iolanta 2018) as Silvano, Lester Lynch as Renzo and Leah-Marian Jones (Rusalka 2016) as Rosa.

Scottish Opera is also performing at the award-winning Lammermuir Festival in East Lothian for the first time this September, with a new semi-staged performance of Benjamin Britten’s The Burning Fiery Furnace.  Soloists, chorus and instrumentalists will perform Britten’s colourful and exotic Church Parable in Haddington’s mediaeval St Mary’s Parish Church, telling the tale of Nebuchadnezzar and the three Israelites.

 

Edgar Cast and Creative Team

 

Conductor                                                                    Gianluca Marcianò

Director                                                                        Roxana Haines

Edgar                                                                           Peter Auty

Tigrana                                                                        Justina Gringyte

Fidelia                                                                         Claire Rutter

Frank                                                                           David Stout

Gualtiero                                                                      Richard Wiegold

                              

Performance Diary

Puccini’s Edgar

28 Oct, 3pm

Theatre Royal Glasgow

NEWS: JOE MCFADDEN TO STAR IN PREMIERE PRODUCTION OF PETER JAMES’ THE HOUSE ON COLD HILL

TV favourite Joe McFadden (The Crow Road, Heartbeat, Holby City, and winner of BBC1’s Strictly Come Dancing 2017) is to appear in The House on Cold Hill at the Theatre Royal, Glasgow next year.

The BAFTA nominated actor, perhaps best known for his roles in Holby City and Casualty, will star as Ollie Harcourt in the spine chilling stage adaption of the best-selling novel by Peter James from Tuesday 28 May until Saturday 1 June 2019.

Based on Peter James’ real life experience in a haunted house the thriller tale tells of Ollie, husband to Caro and father to Jade, whose new dream home quickly turns into the stuff of nightmares, as they begin to sense that they aren’t the only residents at Cold Hill…The House on Cold Hill is a modern day ghostly thriller that will send shivers down your spine and make you think twice about returning home to a dark, empty house upon curtain call.

Joe McFadden played series regular Raf di Lucca in BBC1’s Holby City from 2014 – 2017, and P C Joe Mason in Heartbeat from 2010 – 2014. Other acclaimed TV roles include Sex, Chips and Rock n Roll, The Crow Road (for which he received a BAFTA nomination), Cranford and Take The High Road. His extensive theatrical credits include working with John Tiffany and the National Theatre of Scotland on The Missing, touring the UK with Alan Ayckbourn’s Haunting Julia, Harvey Fierstein’s Torch Song Trilogy at the Menier Chocolate Factory, Rent at the Shaftesbury Theatre in the West End and Rainbow Kiss at the Royal Court. Last year he partnered with Katya Jones in BBC1’s Strictly Come Dancing and captured the nations hearts, eventually winning the series to become the 2017 Strictly Champion.

 Joe McFadden said, “I am so pleased to be on board for the new Peter James stage play. Peter’s had such incredible success as a novelist around the world and it’s been great to see how well his books have translated to the stage. The three previous plays have been huge hits with audiences around the country, so I am excited to have the opportunity to now bring his brilliant ghostly thriller to the stage for the very first time. I am looking forward to us shocking and thrilling audiences around the UK with The House On Cold Hill.”

 Peter James said: “I am very excited that Joe McFadden is going to be starring in the stage adaptation of my novel, The House On Cold Hill. Joe is a brilliant and highly acclaimed actor who has graced our TV screens for many years and I could not have asked for a better leading man for the next Peter James stage outing. I know that audiences around the country will be thrilled to see him back on stage and hopefully equally pleased to see the return of my work to theatres after the sell out runs of the first three plays.  I am humbled by the incredible success of the plays and can’t wait to see audiences enjoying The House On Cold Hill!”

The House on Cold Hill becomes the fourth play in his box office smash hit and critically acclaimed stage franchise following the huge sell-out success of Not Dead Enough, The Perfect Murder and Dead Simple on stage. Nearly half a million fans have now seen his work on stage in 30 cities across the UK and Ireland, with stars including Claire Goose, Shane Richie, Jessie Wallace, Tina Hobley, Les Dennis, Jamie Lomas, Laura Whitmore, Robert Daws, and Dawn Steele.

The House on Cold Hill will reunite Peter James with two time Olivier-nominated theatre producer Joshua Andrews, the Olivier award winning director Ian Talbot and award-winning writer Shaun McKenna. Further star casting to be announced.

Peter James – author of the award-winning Det Supt Roy Grace series – has been acclaimed as ‘one of the most fiendishly clever crime fiction plotters’ (Daily Mail) and his brilliant international bestselling novels have been published in 37 languages and sold over 19 million copies worldwide. Earlier this year, the acclaimed author hit No. 1 again in the UK book charts for the 13th consecutive time, with his latest page-turner, Dead If You Don’t.

His new thriller, Absolute Proof, will be published in hardback on 4 October by Pan Macmillan. Inspired by an unforgettable, real-life phone call received by the author nearly 30 years ago, from a mysterious but altogether credible source, Absolute Proof marks a major milestone for publishing phenomenon Peter James, as his most epic and ambitious stand-alone thriller to date.

LISTINGS

The House on Cold Hill

Theatre Royal, Glasgow

Tue 28 May – Sat 1 Jun 2019

www.atgticekts.com

0844 871 7648* calls cost up to 7 p per minute plus your phone company’s access charge.

WHAT’S ON MARCH: RSC’s Romeo and Juliet at Theatre Royal, Glasgow

The Royal Shakespeare Company’s 2019 tour Romeo and Juliet will run at Theatre Royal, Glasgow next year as part of a UK tour. Tickets are on sale to ATG Theatre Card holders on Tuesday 4 September on go on general sale on Friday 7 September 2018.

The critically acclaimed production will take to the road after its current season in the Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon, where it runs until September 2018, and performances at the Barbican in London November 2018-January 2019.

Two groups of four young people from the local area will share the role of the Chorus with the professional cast.

Directed by RSC Deputy Artistic Director, Erica Whyman, the production features Bally Gill and Karen Fishwick in the roles of Romeo and Juliet.

Erica Whyman said: “In 2016 we toured my production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream around the UK, which involved local amateur groups and school children working alongside our professional cast. I know from first-hand experience the effect this had on those who took part and those who saw the show. It’s therefore a great delight to me to be taking another of my productions, this time Romeo and Juliet, out on the road in 2019.”

Bally Gill’s previous credits for the RSC include Coriolanus, Salome, Vice Versa, Always Orange and Fall of the Kingdom. His other credits include The Island Nation (Arcola Theatre), A Local Boy (The Arts Theatre), Dinner with Saddam (Menier Chocolate Factory), The Bureau of Lost Things (Theatre 503) and NW (BBC/Mammoth Screen).

Karen Fishwick makes her RSC debut. She most recently appeared in Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour (National Theatre of Scotland/Live Theatre). Her other credits include Glasgow Girls (NTS/Citizens), Hansel and Gretel (Citizens Theatre), The Caucasian Chalk Circle, A Christmas Carol (Royal Lyceum, Edinburgh), Badults (BBC Three), James Kirk’s Comedy Blaps, The Illuminati (The Comedy Unit) and Tides and Telegrams (for The Winter Tradition).

Charlotte Josephine, known for her writing as well as acting, plays Mercutio. Charlotte’s hit plays include the award-winning Bitch Boxer and the Edinburgh Festival Fringe sell-out Blush. Her acting credits beyond her own work include being part of the Lyric Hammersmith’s Secret Theatre Company and Phyllida Lloyd’s Julius Caesar at the Donmar Warehouse.

Ishia Bennison plays the Nurse. Ishia’s previous RSC work includes: A Mad World My Masters, Candide, A New Way To Please You, Sejanus: His Fall, Speaking Like Magpies, Cymbeline and Measure for Measure. Her extensive on-screen credits include Happy Valley, New Tricks, Last Tango in Halifax, Much Ado About Nothing and King David with Richard Gere.

Playing Tybalt is Raphael Sowole, whose credits include Simon Stephens‘ adaptation of The Seagull (Lyric Hammersmith), Pygmalion (Headlong, West Yorkshire Playhouse, Nuffield) and Black Theatre Live’s touring production of Hamlet.

The cast also includes: Afolabi Alli (Paris); Donna Banya (Gregory); Stevie Basaula (Sampson); Katy Brittain (Friar John/Apothecary); Raif Clarke (Peter); Beth Cordingly (Escalus); Paul Dodds (Montague); Josh Finan (Benvolio); Andrew French (Friar Laurence); Mariam Haque (Lady Capulet); Michael Hodgson (Capulet); John Macaulay (Cousin Capulet); Tom Padley (Balthasar); Sakuntala Ramanee (Lady Montague) and Nima Taleghani (Abraham).

The production is designed by Tom Piper with lighting by Charles Balfour and sound by Jeremy Dunn. Music is by Sophie Cotton and movement by Ayse Tashkiran.

NEWS: Launching this Saturday – New weekly classes for Primary & Secondary Pupils at the Theatre Royal

Theatre Royal in Glasgow has an exciting opportunity for budding and aspiring performers with its new range of arts workshops tailored for young people of primary and secondary age.

Young Theatre Royal, a brand new programme from Theatre Royal’s Creative Learning team in collaboration with Showworks Theatre Arts, will start begin on Saturday 8 September and run for 11 weeks.

Young Theatre Royal is an exciting and unique series of Saturday classes led by an experienced team of theatre professionals. The sessions are a great way to build confidence, make friends and develop performance skills.

Towards the end of the term, you’ll have the chance to put your performance skills towards achieving your own personalised certificate in performance! There will also be an opportunity to perform with the Royal Shakespeare Company in its production of Romeo and Juliet which runs at Theatre Royal in May 2019.

Ryan Moir, Class Director said: “Having worked with Theatre Royal Creative Learning for ten years, I am delighted to be working in partnership and leading a new programme of classes from Showworks Theatre Arts.  With a range of classes for primary through to secondary ages, the Showworks’ team of experienced industry professionals develop the young people’s skills as they work towards gaining Trinity College Performance Certificates.  Whether you’re looking just to have fun, or are destined for a career on the stage, these classes are for you!”

Alison Cowan, Creative Learning Manager said: “The collaboration with Showworks Theatre Arts is an exciting new phase for Creative Learning, bringing together two leading organisations in theatre making for young people.  As well as the new Saturday classes that provide a structured programme offering Trinity College certification, participants gain access to a unique casting opportunity to perform with the Royal Shakespeare Company in Romeo & Juliet at the Theatre Royal and next year, the much-loved Stage Experience will return in July with another main-scale extravaganza – more on that to come!”

CLASS DETAILS AND LISTINGS

Classes are divided into three stages:

Stage 1

Primary 1-4

1pm-2pm. Classes start on Saturday 8 September and run until Saturday 24 November. Please note there will be no class on Saturday 13 October. The cost is £88 per person for an 11 week block.

http://bit.ly/YoungTRStage1

Stage 2

Primary 5-7

2pm-3.15pm. Classes start on Saturday 8 September and run until Saturday 24 November. Please note there will be no class on Saturday 13 October. The cost is £110 per person for an 11 week block.

http://bit.ly/YoungTRStage2

Stage 3

Secondary 1-6

3.15pm-4.30pm. Classes start on Saturday 8 September and run until Saturday 24 November. Please note there will be no class on Saturday 13 October. The cost is £110 per person for an 11 week block.

http://bit.ly/YoungTRStage3

REVIEW: Love From a Stranger – Theatre Royal, Glasgow

Adapted from a 1934 short story Philomel Cottage, Agatha Christie wrote an unperformed stage version of the same name which itself was re-written as Love From a Stranger by actor and playwright Frank Vosper in 1936. Director Lucy Bailey, for Fiery Angel and Royal & Derngate Northampton, re-sets the action two decades later to the 1950s, all cut-glass accents and limited female opportunity.

This psychological thriller provides a great night’s entertainment, but be aware that this is a slow burn that smoulders along without ever fully bursting into flame.

Cecily Harrington (Helen Bradbury) comes up trumps in a sweepstake, and while Cecily wants to live large on her substantial winnings, her dull as ditch water fiancé Michae (Justin Avoth) arrives back from the Sudan to dash her plans and resign her to a life of domestic drudgery. When an attractive and adventurous American, Bruce Lovell (Sam Frencham) comes on the scene, Cecily’s world is turned on its head. Cecily marries Bruce, moving to an isolated cottage in the country.

The red herrings are positively scarlet. From the beginning it’s clear that Lovell isn’t what he seems. He lurks in the shadows, surreptitiously taking pictures of Cecily, sniffing her lingerie, constantly scribbling in a notebook. Moving her from friends and neighbours, the gaslighting continues until Cecily is an apparent puppet in Lovell’s hands, but all is never as it seems on the surface with Christie. As the tension builds and perspectives change, we are entertainingly led along the crooked path that Christie is so well known for.

This entire production is quite obviously influenced by Michael Powell’s 1960 British cinema classic, Peeping Tom. The sense of unease is cleverly created on Mike Britton’s sliding wall set with opaque panels where we can watch Lovell’s voyeuristic goings-on. Richard Hammarton’s sound design and Oliver Fenwick’s crimson-tinged lighting are characters in themselves, helping to ramp up the creeping tension.

The cast are uniformly solid given how affected the original dialogue sounds to an audience’s modern ear and the ‘heightened’ characterisations skirt (just) on the right side of caricature.

Christie rarely puts a foot wrong, and as a piece of ‘good, old-fashioned’ entertainment it is undoubtedly a winner.

Runs until 30 June 2018 | Image: Contributed, review originally written for The Reviews Hub

 

REVIEW: Birdsong – Theatre Royal, Glasgow

Rachel Wagstaff has gamely adapted Sebastian Faulks’ sprawling, nearly 500 page novel Birdsong, into a two hour 20 minute stage play. First seen in the West End in 2010, it’s now, in its revised form, on its timely fourth and final UK tour, coinciding with the 100th anniversary of the end of the first world war.

This version, unlike the West End original has had a structural overhaul. The play flashes from past to present, love to war. To Wraysford’s life in 1910 in Amiens, where as a young man, he is in France to study the textile industry at the factory of René Azaire. Where he meets and falls in love with René’s much younger wife Isabelle and to 1914-16, the Somme and Wraysford’s life on the French frontline.

While the ill-fated love story between Isabelle and Stephen constitutes a major plotline, it is rendered somewhat wishy-washy in comparison to the war scenes, the chemistry between Wraysford (Tom Kay) and Isabelle (Madeleine Knight) lacking any spark. That this ice-cold pair could ever warm up to passion just doesn’t convince.

It is at its most gripping when it concentrates on the stories of the young men in the trenches. Enough time is given to develop a backstory for each and as a result the audience are emotionally invested in their fates: Sapper Jack Firebrace (Tim Treloar) catapulted from a life digging tunnels for the London Underground to a life digging trenches for the British Army, under-age Tipper (Alfie Browne-Sykes) traumatised by the day-today reality of warfare and ever-chipper Welsh farm boy Evans (Riley Carter) hiding secrets behind the smile.

The set, sound and lighting design add much to the viewing experience and bring the audience closer to the action and the action is enhanced by folk musician James Findlay’s plaintive punctuation of the action.

A play about the horrors of war is always a hard sell, and while this reviewer remains to be convinced of this newest production, in focussing on the human beings behind the gunfire, makes it a gripping, timely and ultimately moving story that deserves to be seen.

This review was originally written for The Reviews Hub

 

REVIEW: Art – Theatre Royal, Glasgow

This review was originally published by The Reviews Hub.

An almost universal hit on its debut in the 90s, French playwright Yasmina Reza’s Tony, Olivier and Moliere Award-winning Art, has embarked on a multi date revival tour of the U.K.

Serge (Nigel Havers), a divorced dermatologist, Marc (Denis Lawson) an engineer and Yvan (Stephen Tompkinson) a stationery salesman’s friendship is well and truly tested when Serge buys a large, expensive, entirely white, piece of modern art. Rational Marc is horrified, Yvan tries to placate the pair, but, when they turn on pacifier Yvan, their 25 year relationship implodes.

Packed with witty, wry, well-observed, razor-sharp dialogue, Art remains as funny as it ever was and the rapid-fire verbal gymnastics, delivered by the sure-footed trio, is an absolute delight. While the piece retains its philosophical, Gallic feel, the rumination on modern art may have lost some of its impact over time. The Brit-Art movement has pervaded popular culture and is less divisive than it once was. What it still does wonderfully, is examine the nature of long-term friendship and the ties that bind. It is brilliantly clever, and beneath the laughs, it poses important questions that we could all ask of our friendships.

Havers, Lawson and Tompkinson are hugely experienced actors and the aplomb and speed with which they tackle Reza’s complex dialogue is laudable. Tompkinson’s seven minute monologue on the politics of wedding invitations receives loud, well-deserved, spontaneous applause. In fact, there are bursts of applause throughout the piece, such is the quality of the work. Comic timing is also key and each actor can raise a laugh with the mere raising of an eyebrow.

At around 80 minutes, Art is short but perfectly formed. This is a class act and an extremely entertaining evening of theatre.

Currently touring the U.K. | Image: Contributed

 

NEWS: Theatre Royal announces The Bodyguard as this year’s Christmas show

Glasgow’s Theatre Royal, have announced that the international smash hit musical, THE BODYGUARD will open its UK tour at Theatre Royal, Glasgow this Christmas.

The show will run from Monday 3 December until Saturday 29 December giving audiences plenty of time to catch the sensational production as it hits all the right notes during the festive season.

The Bodyguard’s month-long run at Theatre Royal follows the success of previous festive seasons including  2015’s Jersey Boys 2016’s The Commitments and last year’s Mamma Mia!

James Haworth, Theatre Director at Theatre Royal, said: “I’m delighted to confirm that the Christmas show at Theatre Royal this year will be The Bodyguard.  It’s an emotionally charged thriller that our audience will just love.

“Shows like The Bodyguard have become a staple in our festive programme and a visit to Theatre Royal at Christmas is becoming a tradition for many.

“If this production goes down as well as Jersey Boys, The Commitments and Mamma Mia!, our audience will be in for a very merry 2018.”

THE BODYGUARD is Based on Lawrence Kasdan’s 1992 Oscar nominated Warner Bros. film starring Whitney Houston and Kevin Costner. The original stage adaptation, directed by Thea Sharrock with book by Oscar winning (Birdman) Alex Dinelaris, had its world premiere at the Adelphi Theatre in London’s West End in 2012 and was nominated for four Olivier Awards.

A sell-out 18 month UK and Ireland tour followed, before the show returned to the West End at the Dominion Theatre. THE BODYGUARD has also played in the Netherlands, Germany, South Korea, Canada, Italy, Australia and China and can currently be seen in Stuttgart, Madrid and on tour throughout France and the United States.

Former Secret Service agent turned bodyguard, Frank Farmer, is hired to protect superstar Rachel Marron from an unknown stalker. Each expects to be in charge; what they don’t expect is to fall in love.

A romantic thriller, THE BODYGUARD features a host of irresistible classics including Queen of the Night, So Emotional, One Moment in Time, Saving All My Love, I’m Your Baby Tonight, Run to You, I Have Nothing, I Wanna Dance with Somebody and one of the biggest hit songs of all time – I Will Always Love You.

LISTINGS

MONDAY 3 DECEMBER – SATURDAY 29 DECEMBER 2018

THEATRE ROYAL, GLASGOW

www.atgtickets.com/glasgow

ON SALE 6 MARCH 2018

 

REVIEW: Flight – Theatre Royal, Glasgow

Jonathan Dove and April De Angelis’ contemporary opera Flight is almost universally loved and with good reason. A knockout score and a story filled with both drama and humour make it a hit with audiences world wide.

Image: James Glossop

Beginning as a story about a series of couples stranded at an airport due to electrical storms, librettist De Angelis discovered the real-life story of Mehran Karimi Nasseri stranded at Charles de Gaulle Airport from 1988 to 2006 (a story which spawned a book The Terminal Man; French movie Tombés du ciel (Lost in Transit); the Steven Spielberg film The Terminal; short story The Fifteen Year Layover; two documentaries Waiting For Godot at De Gaulle and Sir Alfred of Charles De Gaulle Airport as well as the mockumentary Here To Where) and she and Dove wove the story of a refugee hiding at the terminal around the more comic aspects of the opera. The relationships unravel and entwine and all the while the refugee strives to overcome his plight.

Image: James Glossop

Many of the cast reprise their roles from the previous Opera Holland Park production (Jennifer France as the Controller, Victoria Simmonds as Minskwoman and James Laing as the Refugee) and their comfort and familiarity with the roles shows, especially Countertenor Laing whose voice gives goose bumps) however, while France has an impressive top range she was a little underpowered at times). Peter Auty (Bill) and Stephanie Corley (Tina) provide comic relief as the long-married couple seeking to spice up their marriage as do Jonathan McGovern and Sioned Gwen Davies as the randy Steward and Stewardess.

Image: James Glossop

Image: James Glossop

The music has a mid-century cinema musical feel – almost Bernstein or Gershwin-like, it is, at all times, melodic and an absolute joy to the ear. However, personally I can’t help wonder if it would have sounded better for being less ‘operatic’ and more ‘musical theatre’: the operatic voices, in this production all excellent, don’t entirely do the fabulous score justice.

Image: James Glossop

This re-imagined production by director Stepehn Barlow and the design team of Andrew Riley, Richard Howell and Jack Henry James is an absolute joy to watch and listen to, a welcome addition to this season’s operatic programme at Scottish Opera and one not to miss.

Image: James Glossop

The production continues at Glasgow Theatre Royal until 24 February then at the Festival Theatre Edinburgh from 1 to 3 March 2018. 

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