Tag Archives: Easterhouse

WHAT’S ON DECEMBER: Ricky McWhittington a Glasgow panto ideal for children (5yrs+) and adults alike!

Senga McWhittington’s Sweetie Shop in downtown Glasgow is over-run by a swarm of rats, led by the villainous verminous Queen Rat. Nothing can stop this plague until our hero Ricky McWhittington steps in to save the day, with the helping wand of Fairy Gallus Alice, and fearless feline Kitty.

Will good win out? Will Melody find her true love? Will Senga get a man? A festive show bursting with laughs, singalong favourites and family fun.

By Alan McHugh and presented by Glasgow Life.

Ricky McWhittington – Tue 19 – Sat 23 Dec (various times – see website for details)

Age 5yrs+

Tickets: £8.50 / £5 / £4.50 (Local Links)

Platform, The Bridge,

1000 Westerhouse Road

Easterhouse, G34 9JW

T: 0141 276 9696 (opt 1)

info@platform-online.co.uk

http://www.platform-online.co.uk

WHAT’S ON DECEMBER: Platform’s Festive Shows – Rudolph, for the over 3s

Rudolf aimed at everyone from age 3yrs and up and is ideal for a fun festive outing for all the family.

It’s Christmas, but it’s hard to celebrate with no cards, tree, presents or food. If only Esmerelda the chicken would agree to laying an egg…but Esmerelda just won’t be persuaded, unless she hears her favourite story – Rudolf. And so, using their imaginations, the objects in their tiny house and a strong sense of the ridiculous, our two unlikely storytellers attempt the tale of Rudolf, the reindeer that just doesn’t fit in.

Presented by Andy Manley and Platform, the show runs for 50 minutes with no interval – perfect for little ones.

Rudolf – Tue 5 – Sun 17 Dec (various times during day and evening)

Age 3yrs+

Tickets: £8.50 / £5 / £4.50 (Local Links)

http://www.platform-online.co.uk/whats-on/event/391

REVIEW: Shrimp Dance – Platform, Glasgow

Shrimp Dance began with conversations between dancer Paul Michael Henry and marine biologist Dr. Alex Ford. Ford had shown that Prozac levels in the rivers and coastal waters of the UK are now so high they’re affecting the behaviour of shrimp, with the creatures abandoning their dark habitat to swim up towards the light to be eaten by predators.

Henry describes it as “a great wave of human sadness sent out to sea”. Utilising Butoh dance theatre and self-composed music, Henry performs a hypnotic hour of dance drama. The themes explored are huge: ecological crisis, mental health and consumerism, yet the moves are minute and precise – the sheer range, expressiveness and emotional impact of these are a testament to Henry’s considerable skill.

Performed as part of the Scottish Mental Health Arts Festival, it opens up conversations on how mental health and its treatment can have a wider global impact and how the arts can be an avenue through which these conversations can be generated.

Utterly compelling, the astonishingly talented Henry has much to say and hopefully the dialogue will continue.

 

REVIEW: The Sunshine Ghost – Platform, Glasgow

Loosely based on the 1935 Rene Clair film, The Ghost Goes West, The Sunshine Ghost from Richard Ferguson (the pen name of conductor and RCS guest lecturer Richard Lewis) and Andy Cannon, (founder of Wee Stories Theatre for Children) is a work in progress, a co-production between Scottish Theatre Producers and Edinburgh’s Festival and King’s Theatres. The cast of six developing the work as they tour Scotland.

It’s 1958 and love-struck US billionaire, Glen Duval buys a Scottish castle and ships it across the Atlantic for his fiancée, Hollywood astrologer Astrobeth, only to discover that the castle’s ghost refuses to be parted from his ancestral home. Mayhem ensues between Ranald the ghost, Duval’s archaeologist daughter and her soon-to-be-step-mother, including curses, ship-wrecks, a séance, a swipe at Donald Trump, and a Scottish history lesson on Bonnie Prince Charlie, via Prestonpans to the battle of Culloden!

While a work in progress, it runs at a very fully formed two and a half hours. The problem is there are just too many songs, many of them merely filler. There are no costume or set changes to cover and a fair number of them fail to advance the plot in any way. That’s not to say that they are unpleasant or unentertaining, they’re not. Most are evocative of those black and white Saturday afternoon movie musicals of the 40s and 50s, a bit cha-cha-cha and samba-like, there even seems to be a new genre invented – 1950s rap! There’s also an under the sea parody with some fabulously funny lyrics. We could however be doing with a few less songs, a greater variety of musical styles and the story moving at a faster pace.

There’s huge scope for comedy in the story and with the characters. There are some great comedic moments, especially when pianist (and composer) Richard Ferguson gets his chance to shine as the Library of Congress librarian – with comic timing like that he’s woefully underused behind the piano. It’s great fun as it is but the whole thing would be elevated if it tipped even further towards comedy.

The performances are universally solid and the set and props as they are – are cleverly utilised. It’s easy to see how this could be scaled up to a full-blown touring musical – with the rolling hills of Scotland and the castle looming in the moonlight, it could be a tartan shortbread tin of nostalgia.

With shades of The Ghost and Mrs Muir and Blithe Spirit, this has HUGE potential: it just needs a few less songs, more musical variety and more comedy and it could easily be a winner.

Production images: Eoin Carey

SEAT REVIEWS: Platform, Glasgow

OVERVIEW:

Platform, Easterhouse is a 210 seat tiered auditorium.

There are ten main rows of tired seats with a gallery row directly behind that separated by a rail. Two small sets of slip seats are also located on this level.

The seating is unreserved, however, this is not an issue as the sight lines from all seats in the auditorium are excellent. and the size of the auditorium is such that in any seat, you feel close to the action.

The legroom is good, there is a footboard at the back of each seat to prevent kicking the one in front.

The seats are straight backed with arm rests and firmly upholstered.

IF YOU HAVE A REVIEW OF A SEAT IN THIS THEATRE PLEASE CONTACT glasgowtheatreblog@gmail.com or on Twitter @LaurenHumphreyz for your review to be added.

**PLEASE GET IN TOUCH EVEN IF THE SEAT YOU SAT IN HAS ALREADY GOT A REVIEW – WE WANT ALL OPINIONS OF THE SEAT – VIEW/LEGROOM/COMFORT/TEMPERATURE/IS SEAT OFF-SET OR DIRECTLY BEHIND ONE IN FRONT/ IS IT OK FOR TALL or SHORT THEATRE-GOERS? LET US KNOW.

WHAT’S ON NOVEMBER: Tabula Rasa with Vanishing Point and Scottish Ensemble

“Several people have told me essentially this same story about the still, sad music of Arvo Pärt – how it became, for them or for others, a vehicle of solace. One or two such anecdotes seem sentimental; a series of them begins to suggest a slightly uncanny phenomenon.” Alex Ross, New York Times

Credit: Hugh Carswell

Two of Scotland’s foremost performing groups present a co-production that sets Arvo Pärt’s spiritual and mesmeric Tabula Rasa in a theatrical context, exploring the recognised role of the piece in the care of patients during their final days.

With musicians forming an integral part of the drama, this visionary production explores the documented role of Pärt’s haunting piece, which has come to be known – and used – as a profound and transcendental piece of music. It is a life-affirming exploration of care, humanity, suffering – and the uplifting power, and endless importance, of art.

Credit: Hugh Carswell

Vanishing Point is Scotland’s foremost artist-led independent theatre company, internationally acclaimed for its distinctive, groundbreaking work. vanishing-point.org

The UK’s leading string orchestra, Scottish Ensemble is a group of outstanding musicians championing music written for strings, becoming increasingly known for its bold, adventurous collaborations with artists from other genres and forms.

Tabula Rasa Presented by Scottish Ensemble and Vanishing Point

Platform, The Bridge, 1000 Westerhouse Road, Glasgow, G34 9JW

Friday 3 Nov at 7pm (Preview) Saturday 4 Nov at 2pm (Preview)

Tickets: £8.50 / £4.50 / £4 Box Office: 0141 276 9670 (opt 1) or www.platform-online.co.uk/whats-on/event/359

For more about the ensemble visit: scottishensemble.co.uk

For more information about the production please visit the Tabula Rasa mini-site at https://www.tabula-rasa.show/

Header Image: Dev Day

WHAT’S ON OCTOBER: Shrimp Dance presented as part of Scottish Mental Health Arts Festival 2017

SHRIMP DANCE is a new performance dealing with mental health, consumer capitalism, and ecological crisis. It’s a collaboration with marine biologist Dr. Alex Ford, whose experiments have found anti-depressants entering the sea through human waste are affecting the behaviour of shrimp. High levels of prozac are causing shrimp to abandon their shadowy habitat and swim towards the light where they’re often eaten.

THE HUMANS ARE SO SAD THAT THE SHRIMP ARE GOING CRAZY.

The performance will be followed by a discussion with an invited panel about the links between mental health, community, and the environment.

This performance is presented as part of the Scottish Mental Health Arts Festival 2017.

Paul Michael Henry makes live performances rooted in Butoh Dance, music and poetry. His work has travelled around the UK and in Europe, America and Japan, and he is artistic director of UNFIX Festival (www.unfixfestival.com).

SHRIMP DANCE – Paul Michael Henry

Sunday 22 Oct at 2pm

Platform, The Bridge, 1000 Westerhouse Road, Glasgow, G34 9JW 

Tickets: £8.50 / £5 / £4 Box Office: 0141 276 9670 (opt 1) or www.platform-online.co.uk/whats-on/event/403

More info: http://www.paulmichaelhenry.com

WHAT’S ON OCTOBER: SPROG ROCK IS BACK IN GLASGOW

This autumn, Sprog Rock is on the road meeting children from nurseries in Inverclyde, Glasgow, Edinburgh and Stirling to create their next set list.

The sprog rockers by Jassy Earl

Inspired by and made with the children from these nurseries this set list will be like no other!

The Sprog Rock gig will be celebratory, inventive, playful; an interactive experience for all to enjoy, feel part of and join in with!

Sprog Rock has toured throughout Scotland, creating music and gigs for children and adults to enjoy together.

Sprog Rock is an interactive live music experience for Early Years aged children and their parents and carers. Originally developed as part of Katy Wilson’s Starcatchers Residency at Tramway in 2010, Sprog Rock has evolved over the last 7 years to become an innovative live gig experience for our youngest children.

Starcatchers, in partnership with the Sprog Rock team have secured funding from the Youth Music Initiative Fund to deliver a new Sprog Rock project in Autumn 2017.

Image: Chloe Batchelor

This project will see the Sprog Rock band work in nursery settings in 4 partner communities – in Glasgow, Edinburgh, Inverclyde and Stirling – supporting the children in the settings to create new music that the band will incorporate into their sets. There will also be Sprog Rock gigs in each of the communities that the children and their parents will be encouraged to attend at the end of their workshop blocks.

Sprog Rock is presented by Starcatchers and Sprog Rock in association with Platform Platform, The Bridge, 1000 Westerhouse Road, Glasgow G34 9JW

Saturday 21 Oct at 2pm Sunday 22 Oct at 10.30am Tickets: £8.50 / £5 / £4 (Local Links) Box Office: 0141 276 9696 (opt 1) or http://www.platform-online.co.uk/whats-on/event/377

Sprog Rock is designed to push the ideas of what is of interest to young children – and what they are capable of creating.

For more info visit http://www.starcatchers.org.uk/engagement/sprog-rock-2017/ Twitter @StarcatchersUK / @PlatformGlasgow

Facebook @StarcatchersUK / @PlatformGlasgow

Instagram @starcatchersuk @sprogrock @PlatformGlasgow

 

WHAT’S ON OCTOBER: Love Song to Lavender Menace at Platform

Love Song to Lavender Menace, will be at Platform, Easterhouse on Sunday 29 October 2017.

On Edinburgh’s Forth Street in 1982, two friends – Bob and Sigrid – open their new LGBT and Feminist bookshop, Lavender Menace. A trailblazing venture that began life in the cloakroom of a gay club, the shop quickly becomes the beating heart for Edinburgh’s LGBT+ community.

Image: Aly Wight

Now, on the final night of the shop’s existence, sales assistants Lewis and Glen take a look back at its origins, its importance, its celebration of queer culture, how things have changed…and straight away, the arguments begin.

Image: Aly Wight

Love Song to Lavender Menace is a love story, in which two guys wrestle with their feelings for each other, for books, and for the changing world they find themselves in. It is a beautifully funny and moving exploration of the love and passion it takes to make something happen, and the loss that is felt when you finally have to let it go.

Image: Aly Wight

Playwright James Ley says: “Writing a play about a bookshop could have been really dry, but the people behind the scenes of this iconic place have made telling this story anything but. This little-known slice of Scottish LGBT+ history has fascinated me as I’ve probed into the story and the world of early 80s Edinburgh. The energy, passion and senses of humour of shop founders Bob Orr and Sigrid Nielsen, and all the people they worked with on this groundbreaking venture, is what fed the drama. I wanted to show the ingenuity, determination, and anarchy of working in the shop. What I’ve arrived at is a bit of a love story between two young guys working in the shop, debating its history and their individual, and shared, futures, on the last night of the shop’s existence. I’d like everyone in Edinburgh and across Scotland to see this play, whether they identify as LGBT+ or not, as I think we’ve got an unique history we should all be proud of that is at times joyful, at times painful, but through it all, you can always find the humour and the love.”

Director Ros Philips says: This is the right time to be telling this story. The argument in the play around capitalism versus community is what attracted me to it, along with the exploration of the feminist roots of Edinburgh’s LGBT activism. Love Song to Lavender Menace also alerted me to Rita Mae Brown, author of Ruby Fruit Jungle, and I’m very excited to share her and all the other characters with a Lyceum audience.”

Matthew McVarish, playing David, says: “I’m very proud to be a part of this play. As a gay Scotsman, this play has taught me incredible things about my own history that I’d never heard before. I’m sure many generations will be grateful to James for cataloguing these significant events in such a beautiful and fun play.”

Love Song to Lavender Menace By James Ley Directed by Ros Philips Starring Matthew McVarish and Pierce Reid.

Platform, Glasgow – 29 October at 2:00pm

Ticket Office: 0141 276 9696 (opt 1) or http://www.platform-online.co.uk

 

 

REVIEW: Eastern Promise Festival – Pictish Trail – Platform, Easterhouse

From the isle of Eigg via Edinburgh, Johnny Lynch aka Pictish Trail, delivers an accomplished set to round off the first night of Platform’s Eastern Promise festival.

At times: folk, rave, hip-hop, trip-hop, electro and wearing the legacy of jangly Scottish pop on its sleeve, Lynch manages to pack more styles and sounds into this one performance than a festival-load of artists.

Wistful, ethereal, harmonious, soaring, screaming, but at all times original and entirely pleasing to the ear, Pictish Trail deserve to be heard.

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