Tag Archives: Easterhouse

WHAT’S ON DECEMBER: Mother Goose fae Easterhoose is Platform’s Christmas show

This festive season Platform presents a brand new Christmas show for all the family at The Bridge in Easterhouse. Written by Glasgow-based playwright, director and theatre maker Lewis Hetherington, Mother Goose Fae Easterhoose sees an original take on the classic fairy tale with plenty of local humour.

Hetherington has contributed to Platform’s Christmas programme for a number of years. The show will see 18 performances run between the 10th and 23rd of December 2019.

Happy living a quiet peaceful life, looking after her animal friends, with just enough to get her by, Mother Goose’s world is thrown up in the air when her favourite pet Bruce the goose lays a golden egg. Everything changes… she is rich! What will she do with this new found wealth and fame? Will Mother Goose stay true to her self or will she get lost in a whirlwind of fancy clothes, sports cars and celebrity pals?

Come along to find out, and expect jokes, songs and raucous storytelling. The show is ideal for everyone aged 5 years and over, lasting 70 minutes with no interval. Group bookings are welcomed, and goody bags available in a range of sizes for all ages.

Lewis is a writer, director and theatre maker whose work is rooted in collaboration and storytelling. He has won two Fringe First Awards and an Adelaide Fringe Award. His work has been presented throughout the Scotland and the rest of the world including performances in Australia, China, Japan, Saudi Arabia, Dubai, Germany, USA and Japan amongst others.

MOTHER GOOSE FAE EASTERHOOSE

Tue 10 Dec, 10am

Wed 11 Dec, 10am & 7pm

Thu 12 Dec, 1pm

Fri 13 Dec, 10am & 7pm

Sat 14 Dec, 2pm & 7pm

Mon 16 Dec, 10am & 7pm

Tue 17 Dec, 10am

Wed 18 Dec, 10am

Fri 20 Dec, 7pm

Sat 21 Dec, 2pm & 7pm

Sun 22, Dec 2pm

Mon 23 Dec, 2pm & 7pm

 

For age 5 years and above.

 

TICKET PRICES: £9.50 (Full Price) / £6 (Concession) / £5 (Local Links)

There is also a significant discount available for members of Platform’s Local Links scheme, available for those living in a range of local postcodes as well as family and group tickets open to all – more information available online here.

Platform, The Bridge

1000 Westerhouse Road,

Easterhouse, Glasgow, G34 9JW

www.platform-online.co.uk / info@platform-online.co.uk

0141 276 9696 (opt 1)

WHAT’S ON OCTOBER: Bodies of Water – an immersive performance experience

Bodies of Water is a playful, multi-sensory performance experience weaving together movement, choreography, water, objects and sound. We encounter water in our everyday lives – through our bodies and environment. We invite you to immerse yourselves in a unique performance experience, as we explore and celebrate this transformative element that connects all living things.

 

Bodies of Water is a collaborative, interdisciplinary and experimental performance project initiated by Glasgow-based choreographer/performer Saffy Setohy in 2018 in response to BRAW, a project by The Touring Network. Made and performed by a collective of artists including Aya Kobayashi choreographer/performer, Joanna Young choreographer/performer, Nicolette Macleod musician/sound designer and Saffy Setohy. Bodies of Water will premiere with Findhorn Bay Arts at the James Milne Institute on Saturday 21st September 2019, before touring to places and communities in Scotland.

People and environment are at the heart of the work. Explored through choreography, movement, sound, visual art and participatory practices, Bodies of Water aims to draw connections between our experiences as humans made mostly of water, our relationship to it personally, politically, environmentally, and the materiality of water (its choreographic, sculptural and sound potential). Underpinning the work, is an understanding that if we can connect to and inhabit the realities of our bodies and experiences, we will relate to and more easily consider our environment, our communities and the challenges that we face.

The artists expanded their choreographic practice to include walking and moving, drawing, writing, arranging, making, reading and sounding. Their research has ranged over diverse terrain; their felt sense and memories of water in their environment and bodies, the body as a container and vessel, water filtration, deep mapping, deep time, geological processes, plastic pollution, ‘artificial’ nature, the materiality of water in its liquid, solid and gaseous states. They have developed the work in Forres, Findhorn, Dunbar and Glasgow, sharing ideas with audiences along the way. They were part of the exhibition, TIDE:Dialogues of Change in Dunbar, presenting traces of their research in a range of media.  They also facilitated a creative walk as part of the Moray Walking & Outdoor Festival.

Platform Easterhouse, GlasgowSaturday 12th October, 1pm & 4pm

www.platform-online.co.uk/ 0141 276 9696 [Opt 1]

Image Credit: Julia Bauer

REVIEW: W-hat About? – Platform, Glasgow

An ageing Scottish hat maker is preparing for a visit from his teenaged Italian granddaughters who he hasn’t seen since they were toddlers, in Fuora Dance Project’s beautifully crafted dance drama, W-hat About?

An international, intergenerational tale of misunderstanding, memory and remembrance, it moves from awkward introductions, communication mishaps, teenage strops, ultimately to acceptance and celebration where the family members’ mutual creativity brings them together to remember the person they have loved and lost.

Played out on a simplistic but extremely imaginative set, the choreography is exquisite, expressive and eye-catching, it is also perfectly crafted to capture the imagination of the tiny audience members for whom it was created. That said, it is equally vibrant for the grown ups too. The way in which the language barrier is represented, the contrast between granddad’s lilting Scots and the rapid-fire Italian of the teenage girls is cleverly done. The use of shadow play is also hauntingly beautiful as the story reaches its conclusion.

At just 45 minutes long, W-hat About? is an exemplary piece of children’s theatre: filled with clever visuals, arresting choreography and a story that captures the hearts and minds of both young and old.

Continues on tour around Scotland.

This review was originally written for The Reviews Hub

REVIEW: The Monster and Mary Shelley – Platform, Glasgow

The Villa Diodati near Lake Geneva. Summer, but not any old summer. This was 1816, dubbed “the year without summer”, incessant rain, thunder and lightning, cock’s crowing at noon and orange snow covering the mountainsides. Months previously Mount Tamboro in Indonesia had erupted, spewing clouds of volcanic ash northwards, but this is the 19th Century, news travels slowly, superstition, not science still abounds. These sinister, portentous happenings lend an almost supernatural aura to events at the Villa. So, when Lord Byron challenges the gathered company to write a ghost story, it is no wonder that this special set of circumstances gave birth to both John Polidori’s The Vampyre, the tale that inspired Bram Stoker’s Draculaand Mary (Godwin) Shelley’s enduring masterpiece, Frankenstein.

Celebrating the 200th anniversary of the publication of the novel, theatre company The Occasion take us on “an outlandish trip through the mind of one of literature’s most influential imaginations”. In doing so, they address the oft asked questions and rumours that have endured surrounding the writing of Frankenstein. How could a women, let alone an 18 year old, write this? It was really Percy Bysshe Shelley who wrote it. But this is no ordinary 18 year old. The daughter of feminist and philosopher Mary Wollstonecraft and philosopher William Godwin, this was a child born for greatness. A woman who, as a small child, received a tiny lectern as a present so she could join her father’s intellectual salon. Laudably, The Monster and Mary Shelley shines a light on the life of Mary. Did she write Frankenstein as a direct result of her unconventional past, or despite it? Tellingly she shouts to the monster, “you, you were the light relief”.

Stewart Ennis’ captivating script sparkles, weaving the contemporary with the classical. There’s high melodrama, horror and a huge dose of comedy. It also draws parallels between celebrity then and now, the hacks of the day following the perceived debauchery at the Villa Diodati as keenly as every move of a Kardashian. There’s also an ear-pleasing contemporary score from Richard Williams.

Catherine Gillard delivers a tour de force performance as Mary. Switching from child to teenage rebel to adult dealing with love, lust and loss. This is a well-judged piece of writing, one that will appeal to those interested in the historical events in the colourful life of Mary, and appeal to young audiences thanks to its quick, modern and witty prose. Highly recommended.

Reviewed on 25 April 2018 then touring | Image: Marc Marnie

THIS REVIEW WAS ORIGINALLY WRITTEN FOR THE REVIEWS HUB.

 

 

REVIEW: Ricky McWhittington – Platform, Easterhouse, Glasgow

Senga McWhittington presides over the Oldie Weegie Sweetie Shoppie in dear old Glasgow town, but her son Ricky has different ambitions – he’s set to head to the bright lights of the big city. When Senga’s shop becomes over-run with vermine, all under the control of the stinky Queen Rat, Senga needs her boy back to help save the day. Helped by Fairy Gallus Alice and a cast of colourful pals, will the shop be saved, will Ricky fulfil his destiny and will Senga get her man? That’s the story of Ricky McWhittington, this year’s festive offering from Platform.

Every panto trope is here: the goodies and the baddies to cheer and hiss and boo; the rhyming dialogue; the fantastically clad panto dame ready to harass some unsuspecting (male) audience members; a young couple falling in love, some up-beat pop numbers to dance to, and the traditional ‘cloot’ so we can sing along together at the end.

This is a panto full of charm and heart and perfectly pitched to its young, local audience. The cast are universally excellent, the acting so good, the tiny audience members know exactly who to boo and hiss for from the start, and hearteningly the girls kick ass and can stand their ground against any foe.

This is a panto who knows its audience well – both child and adult friendly, the audience is fully engaged from start to end. An absolute charmer from a fantastic cast, in a wonderful theatre with the friendliest and most welcoming staff in the city.

Tickets are almost sold out, so be fast, details here: http://www.platform-online.co.uk/whats-on/event/392/

 

REVIEW: Rudolph – Platform, Easterhouse, Glasgow

Esmerelda is one unhappy chicken, not only does she want to be called Joyce now, she’s also in no mood to provide the much needed eggs for the poor storytellers Christmas dinner – two poor storytellers who have no cards and no presents either. Esmerelda decides that she’ll only lay an egg if the pair re-tell her favourite story, that of Rudolph the famous red-nosed reindeer.

Rudolph (for pre-schoolers) is as far removed from the brash, candy-coloured pantomimes on offer around the city, this is the gentlest of storytelling, played out on a beautiful, naturalistic cottage-yard set, illuminated by the most beautiful lighting effects from Sergey Jakovsky.

While it does tend to stray on the side of the bizarre – there’s a strange ‘birthing’ sequence for Rudolph and Olive (the other reindeer) relishes her torment of poor Rudolph at reindeer school, it’s a gentle introduction into modern theatre for the tiniest of audience members.

The highlight of the night is when the only song of the evening plays from the radio Edwin Starr’s HAPPY Radio and the tiny dancers in the auditorium burst into life. The creators would do well to take note of the effect of music on young children – it speaks to their very soul. At only 45 minutes long it should fly by but it lacks the necessary life it takes to make it a real hit with its target audience, there’s a lot of restlessness around. A work of quality but not without its faults.

Runs until 17 December at various times

Tickets from £4.50 (local links) /£5/ £8.50

https://platform-online.ticketsolve.com/shows/873580110/events/128296769?_ga=2.1147190.662329583.1512841957-1557944836.1492164954

Sun 10 Dec
2:00pm—3:00pm
Tues 12 Dec
10:00am—11:00am
Tues 12 Dec
1:15pm—2:15pm
Weds 13 Dec
10:00am—11:00am
Weds 13 Dec
7:00pm—8:00pm
Thurs 14 Dec
10:00am—11:00am
Fri 15 Dec
10:00am—11:00am
Sat 16 Dec
10:30am—11:30am
Sat 16 Dec
2:00pm—3:00pm
Sun 17 Dec
2:00pm—3:00pm

REVIEW: Shrimp Dance – Platform, Glasgow

Shrimp Dance began with conversations between dancer Paul Michael Henry and marine biologist Dr. Alex Ford. Ford had shown that Prozac levels in the rivers and coastal waters of the UK are now so high they’re affecting the behaviour of shrimp, with the creatures abandoning their dark habitat to swim up towards the light to be eaten by predators.

Henry describes it as “a great wave of human sadness sent out to sea”. Utilising Butoh dance theatre and self-composed music, Henry performs a hypnotic hour of dance drama. The themes explored are huge: ecological crisis, mental health and consumerism, yet the moves are minute and precise – the sheer range, expressiveness and emotional impact of these are a testament to Henry’s considerable skill.

Performed as part of the Scottish Mental Health Arts Festival, it opens up conversations on how mental health and its treatment can have a wider global impact and how the arts can be an avenue through which these conversations can be generated.

Utterly compelling, the astonishingly talented Henry has much to say and hopefully the dialogue will continue.

 

REVIEW: The Sunshine Ghost – Platform, Glasgow

Loosely based on the 1935 Rene Clair film, The Ghost Goes West, The Sunshine Ghost from Richard Ferguson (the pen name of conductor and RCS guest lecturer Richard Lewis) and Andy Cannon, (founder of Wee Stories Theatre for Children) is a work in progress, a co-production between Scottish Theatre Producers and Edinburgh’s Festival and King’s Theatres. The cast of six developing the work as they tour Scotland.

It’s 1958 and love-struck US billionaire, Glen Duval buys a Scottish castle and ships it across the Atlantic for his fiancée, Hollywood astrologer Astrobeth, only to discover that the castle’s ghost refuses to be parted from his ancestral home. Mayhem ensues between Ranald the ghost, Duval’s archaeologist daughter and her soon-to-be-step-mother, including curses, ship-wrecks, a séance, a swipe at Donald Trump, and a Scottish history lesson on Bonnie Prince Charlie, via Prestonpans to the battle of Culloden!

While a work in progress, it runs at a very fully formed two and a half hours. The problem is there are just too many songs, many of them merely filler. There are no costume or set changes to cover and a fair number of them fail to advance the plot in any way. That’s not to say that they are unpleasant or unentertaining, they’re not. Most are evocative of those black and white Saturday afternoon movie musicals of the 40s and 50s, a bit cha-cha-cha and samba-like, there even seems to be a new genre invented – 1950s rap! There’s also an under the sea parody with some fabulously funny lyrics. We could however be doing with a few less songs, a greater variety of musical styles and the story moving at a faster pace.

There’s huge scope for comedy in the story and with the characters. There are some great comedic moments, especially when pianist (and composer) Richard Ferguson gets his chance to shine as the Library of Congress librarian – with comic timing like that he’s woefully underused behind the piano. It’s great fun as it is but the whole thing would be elevated if it tipped even further towards comedy.

The performances are universally solid and the set and props as they are – are cleverly utilised. It’s easy to see how this could be scaled up to a full-blown touring musical – with the rolling hills of Scotland and the castle looming in the moonlight, it could be a tartan shortbread tin of nostalgia.

With shades of The Ghost and Mrs Muir and Blithe Spirit, this has HUGE potential: it just needs a few less songs, more musical variety and more comedy and it could easily be a winner.

Production images: Eoin Carey

SEAT REVIEWS: Platform, Glasgow

OVERVIEW:

Platform, Easterhouse is a 210 seat tiered auditorium.

There are ten main rows of tiered seats with a gallery row directly behind that separated by a rail. Two small sets of slip seats are also located on this level.

The seating is unreserved, however, this is not an issue as the sight lines from all seats in the auditorium are excellent and the size of the auditorium is such that in any seat, you feel close to the action.

The legroom is good, there is a footboard at the back of each seat to prevent kicking the one in front.

The seats are straight backed with arm rests and firmly upholstered.

IF YOU HAVE A REVIEW OF A SEAT IN THIS THEATRE PLEASE CONTACT glasgowtheatreblog@gmail.com or on Twitter @LaurenHumphreyz for your review to be added.

**PLEASE GET IN TOUCH EVEN IF THE SEAT YOU SAT IN HAS ALREADY GOT A REVIEW – WE WANT ALL OPINIONS OF THE SEAT – VIEW/LEGROOM/COMFORT/TEMPERATURE/IS SEAT OFF-SET OR DIRECTLY BEHIND ONE IN FRONT/ IS IT OK FOR TALL or SHORT THEATRE-GOERS? LET US KNOW.

REVIEW: Eastern Promise Festival – Pictish Trail – Platform, Easterhouse

From the isle of Eigg via Edinburgh, Johnny Lynch aka Pictish Trail, delivers an accomplished set to round off the first night of Platform’s Eastern Promise festival.

At times: folk, rave, hip-hop, trip-hop, electro and wearing the legacy of jangly Scottish pop on its sleeve, Lynch manages to pack more styles and sounds into this one performance than a festival-load of artists.

Wistful, ethereal, harmonious, soaring, screaming, but at all times original and entirely pleasing to the ear, Pictish Trail deserve to be heard.

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