Tag Archives: amateur

AMATEUR FOCUS: Theatre South Productions present The Wedding Singer at Eastwood Park

Theatre South present The Wedding Singer at Eastwood Park Theatre from Tuesday 19 – Saturday 23 March.

Following the sold-out performances of 9 to 5 and Hairspray, Theatre South Productions bring you this hilarious 80s musical, based on the hit Adam Sandler film.

Go back to 1985, when New Jersey wedding singer Robbie Hart’s life crumbles around him after his own fiancée leaves him at the altar.  Devastated, Robbie plots to make every wedding as disastrous as his own until he meets Julia, a winsome waitress who wins his affection.  Much to Robbie’s dismay, Julia is about to be married to a Wall Street shark, and unless Robbie can pull off the performance of a lifetime, the girl of his dreams will be lost forever.

Prices

  • £15 – £17

www.theatresouthproductions.co.uk

Tickets also available from club members or theatresouthproductions@hotmail.com

REVIEW: Elf – King’s Theatre, Glasgow

elf musical logo

The festive season is off to a grand start with The Pantheon Club’s production of Elf. Based on the 2003 Will Ferrell movie, Matthew Sklar, Chad Beguelin, Thomas Meehan and Bob Martin’s musical version is a treat for the whole family and bound to become a holiday favourite.

Motherless toddler Buddy Hobbs crawls into Santa’s sack by mistake and is transported to the North Pole where he grows up to be one of the elves working in Santa’s toy factory. Standing several feet taller than his fellow ‘elves’ Buddy finds out he’s actually human and return to New York to find his father. Dad is firmly on the naughty list and Buddy endeavours to help his dad and New York City re-discover the true meaning of Christmas.

Pantheon’s amateur production is high on production values (it puts many recent professional touring productions to shame) and impressive in its casting. Graeme Wallace is outstanding as the naïve Buddy, his comic timing and assured vocals are on-point throughout. He is ably supported by a universally impressive ensemble. The acting, vocals, choreography and its execution are of professional quality.

No it’s not the most demanding show, it’s not going to win any awards for the quality of the writing, and the tunes are pleasant but not spectacular, but it’s the kind of show that will warm even the hardest of hearts and set you up perfectly for the festive season ahead. A triumph for the Pantheon Club (dare I start an appeal for a repeat run? Same time, same place – next year).

Image courtesyPantheon Club.

REVIEW: White Christmas – Motherwell Theatre, Motherwell

The Christmas Season has started early in Motherwell as Our Lady’s Musical Society present one of the best-loved seasonal shows of all time, Irving Berlin’s White Christmas. A show that never fails to warm the cockles of even the hardest of hearts.

After leaving the army and their pals in the 151st Division, Captain Bob Wallace and his buddy Private Phil Davis become celebrated song and dance men. When they hear that their beloved old General is running a failing hotel in Vermont, they hatch a plan to help. With misunderstanding, mayhem and a touch of romance thrown into the mix, the duo try to ensure that everyone has the perfect white Christmas after all.

Where this production is on to a winner is the casting of the central roles, Andrew Rodger (Phil Davis) and Christopher Morris (Bob Wallace) are a knock-out pairing. Wallace’s wonderfully, warm-toned voice would give Bing Crosby a run for his money any day of the week, but it is Rodger who really shines; a fabulously talented actor, his finely detailed and brilliantly judged performance commands the stage. So on-point is he that he could grace any professional production.

The enviable talent of the central duo does, however, throw into sharp contrast any weaknesses. The pair are a hard act to grace a stage with and some fair better than others. Who does succeed and does so phenomenally well, is pint-sized, 11 year old Samantha Todd. Most astonishing is the fact that Todd stepped into the role knowing neither show nor part, with only four days to curtain up, due to the indisposition of the original actress ( it would have been nice if the programme could have reflected this – a typed slip added in to credit her effort). Todd, to put it simply, is a star. Her accent is perfect, her comic timing sublime and her singing and dancing skills put many of the adult actors to shame. This kid is going to go far.

The rest of the principal cast are a sure-footed bunch save for Julie Thomson as Betty Haynes. Thomson’s American accent is poor and her light soprano range isn’t suited to Berlin’s jazzy tunes.

The simple set comprised drop cloths and minimal props but served the production well and the changes were smooth and slick. (One quibble would be the feeble snow effect at the end – it is White Christmas after all). The costumes were a bit hit and miss period-wise and the wigs were, quite frankly, shockingly bad – those with styled natural hair were more period appropriate. Overall though, the look of the production was pleasing.

The large band were on form and fine-sounding throughout, doing full justice to Irving Berlin’s sublime tunes and the sound balance was well-judged.

An entertaining evening at the theatre and a lovely start to the festive season that will leave you looking forward to what’s next from Our Lady’s Musical Society.

 

REVIEW: Evita – Eastwood Park Theatre, Giffnock

On one hand a masterclass in social climbing: B Movie actress and nightclub ‘hostess’ rises to become the saintly spiritual leader of the poorest and most disaffected in her country, on the other a portrait of a social climber who achieved riches and power in a finely calculated rise to the top. Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Evita is both a love letter to the saintly Eva Peron and an expose, through Che’s contradictory narrative that highlights Eva’s part in husband Juan Peron’s violent dictatorship, their silencing of enemies and the misappropriation of ‘charity” donations.

Evita is also a show melodically complex and huge in its staging, so it’s a brave undertaking for an amateur company, but Runway Theatre Company prove they are more than a match for Rice and Lloyd Webber’s epic musical.

The stage teems with life and under the disciplined direction of Robert Fyfe the hugely talented cast keep it tight and focussed throughout. Worthy of note is Greg Robertson’s exceptionally clever choreography, which plays to the strengths of a cast that varies in age and ability. At all times it is on-point and highly effective. There are some shining stars in the cast: as Che, Johnny Collins’ performance would put some recent castings in professional productions to shame, his diction is crystal clear and his delivery of Che’s iconic songs, in particular “Oh What a Circus” and “High Flying Adored”, are beautifully judged. Runway regulars J. Campbell Kerr (Peron) and Tom Russell (Magaldi) are in supremely fine voice as ever, as is newcomer Christina Rose Leon as Peron’s mistress. Less successful is Caroline Telfer as Eva, strong in her lower range, she ventures into shrillness in the soaring high notes, she also struggles in duets with Kerr and Collins, appearing to fight against the pair, who are both vocally excellent, instead of harmonising as the melodies require.

Runway do full justice to the dramatic intensity of Rice and Lloyd Webber’s much-loved work. This is a hugely accomplished staging with a stunning ensemble and strong core casting. As ever it leaves you waiting and wondering – what’s next from this exceptionally fine company?