Tag Archives: What’s on February

WHAT’S ON FEBRUARY: The Dark by Nick Makoha at the TRON

Fuel open Tron Theatre’s main house season this Spring with The Dark (15 & 16 Feb), the harrowing and uplifting autobiographical story of poet Nick Makoha’s migration with his mother at the age of four to escape a country divided by dictatorship and consumed by conflict.

‘Night is not the only darkness. Nick takes a breath as he tries to remember.’ Fragments of a forgotten journey flicker in front of his eyes. It is night, November 1978. He is four years old. He is holding his mother’s hand as they wait on the escarpment. They are leaving Kampala. Buying safe passage and silence with all they have, they travel by matatu and the conductor asks no questions. Their companions are the missing, lost and displaced. Those who have suffered eight long years under the rule of Idi Amin.

Two performers, Akiya Henry and Michael Balogun play multiple characters in this exploration of memory directed by the award-winning Roy Alexander Weise (Nine Night) and The Dark is a co-commission by Fuel and Ovalhouse as part of their First Bites series.

Fuel Director, Kate McGrath said:
Brilliant artists create a space for a temporary community to come together and seek to understand and to imagine. Fuel’s job is to identify those living artists and bring their urgent and brave work to life for people to experience. Our 2019 season, which includes Nick Makoha’s The Dark, celebrates our common humanity: how we all connect to the earth and to each other.

Running time: 90 minutes (no interval)

WHAT’S ON FEBRUARY: Scotland’s Little Fix announce Glasgow, Lanark and Largs dates

Finalists in BBC One’s Even Better Than the Real Thing, officially voted the UK’s number one Little Mix tribute act in last year’s National Tribute Music Awards, Glasgow’s Little Fix are coming to town. . .

Since winning TV’s The X Factor Little Mix have become the biggest girl group on the planet – topping the charts with Black Magic, Shout Out to My Ex, Wings and Cannonball among their 20 million-selling hits that also include Power, Woman Like Me, Move, Only You, DNA, Love Me Like You, Touch, Change Your Life, How Ya Doin’, Little Me and Reggaeton Lento.

Show promoter David Halford of Artistes International Management says that Little Fix deliver a high energy show that replicates the energy, stage presence and vocal abilities of the original group. “With stunning stage outfits to match,” he says. “Little Fix power through all of Little Mix’s biggest hits with identical choreography and vocal finesse that puts ‘Girl Power’ firmly back on the agenda.”

Since their TV success, Little Fix have toured the UK bringing the greatest hits of Little Mix alive on stage while Little Mix themselves have lined up a number of arena shows .

“With Little Mix not set to tour until late autumn next year,” says David, “why wait to get your fix of Little Mix, catch Little Fix at your local theatre in the coming weeks.”

Tickets for the weekend afternoon show are available from the venue box office.

LITTLE FIX The UK’s No1 Little Mix Tribute

Saturday 9 February, 2019 2pm

LANARK MEMORIAL HALL St Leonard Street, Lanark ML11 7AB

sllcboxoffice.co.uk  01555 667999

Sunday 10 February, 2019 2pm

GLASGOW PAVILION 121 Renfield Street, Glasgow G2 3AX

paviliontheatre.co.uk  0141 332 1846

Saturday 16 February, 2019 2pm

BARRFIELD THEATRE Largs

barrfields.co.uk  01475 689777

WHAT’S ON FEBRUARY: Richard Clayderman announces only UK date for 2019 at Glasgow Royal Concert Hall

Richard Clayderman Celebrates his 40th Anniversary With Exclusive UK Performance

Best-selling recording artist and concert performer, Richard Clayderman, will present his only 2019 UK show at the Royal Concert Hall, Glasgow, on Thursday, February 28. at 7.30pm

Marking the 40th anniversary of his music career, the French pianist has insisted that he is accompanied by a string section from Glasgow for the extra-special show, says show promoter David Halford.

“With album sales in excess of 150 million and with 267 gold and 70 platinum albums to his name, no wonder he has been crowned the most popular pianist in the world,” says David.

Richard Clayderman himself says: “For my concert in Glasgow, I will perform a good selection of my original titles as well as lots of romantic themes and film classics.

“I look forward to meeting all my fans at the Royal Concert Hall as they are true connoisseurs and we all share the same emotions and sensations.”

Richard’s distinctive piano style has seen him record more than 1, 200 melodies and, in the words of a German journalist, “he has arguably done more to popularise the piano around the world than anyone since Beethoven”.

“The Prince of Romance” (as he was dubbed by Nancy Reagan) was born Philippe Pagès. His father, a piano teacher, began teaching him how to play at a very young age. It is said that, at the age of six, Richard Clayderman could read music more adeptly than his native French.

When he was 12 years old he was accepted at the Conservatoire of Music where, at 16, he won first prize. He was predicted a promising career as a classical pianist. However, shortly after this, and much to everyone’s surprise, he cast aside his classical training and turned to contemporary music.

“I wanted to do something different,” Richard says, “So, with some friends, I created a rock group; it was a tough time, a hard time and the little money we could make was devoted to buying equipment. In fact, I used to feed myself so badly – mainly on sandwiches – that I had to have an operation for an ulcer when I was only 17.”

In order to earn a living, Clayderman found work as an accompanist and session musician. “I enjoyed it”, he says, “and it paid well at the same time. That is how I drew away from classical music, although it gave me a strong basis for what I do now.”

His talent did not go unnoticed and he soon became much in demand as an accompanist to such major French stars as Michel Sardou, Thierry LeLuron and Johnny Halliday.

His life changed dramatically in 1976 when he received a telephone call from Olivier Toussaint, a well-known French record producer, who, with his partner, Paul de Senneville, was looking for a pianist to record a gentle piano ballad. Paul had composed this ballad as a tribute to his new born daughter Adeline.

Philippe Pagès’ name was changed to Richard Clayderman (he adopted his great-grandmother’s last name to avoid mispronunciation of his real name outside France), and the single took off, selling an astonishing 22 million copies in 38 countries. It was called “Ballade pour Adeline”.

“When I signed him”, says Olivier Toussaint, “I told him that if we sell 10,000 singles it will be marvellous, because it was disco at that time and we could not bet on such a ballad being a winner. We could not imagine that it would be so big.”

It was the start of what has become an outstanding success story, and since that time, Richard Clayderman’s distinctive piano style has earned him superstar status all over the world.

Thursday, February 28, 2019  7.30pm

RICHARD CLAYDERMAN

GLASGOW ROYAL CONCERT HALL

Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow G2 3NY

glasgowconcerthalls.com   0141 353 8000

WHAT’S ON JANUARY: Rebus – Long Shadows comes to Glasgow

Tue 29 Jan – Sat 2 Feb
Theatre Royal
Tickets from £13
By Ian Rankin, adapted by Rona Munro.

Featuring Charles Lawson as John Rebus, Cathy Tyson as Siobhan Clarke and John Stahl as Big Ger Cafferty, directed by Robin Lefevre.

The new story exclusively on stage. Detective Inspector John Rebus is retired but the shadows of his former life still follow him through the streets of Edinburgh. Whisky helped but now he’s denying himself that pleasure. But when the daughter of a murder victim appears outside his flat, he’s back on the case and off the wagon.

NEWS: War Horse’s Joey visits Glasgow before its run at the SEC Armadillo

The National Theatre’s acclaimed production of War Horse, based on the novel by Michael Morpurgo arrives at The SEC Armadillo from 15 January – 2 February 2019 as part of a national tour.

Joey, the life-size equine puppet from War Horse made a special early appearance in Glasgow next to The Duke of Wellington Statue last week as well as his home for January – The SEC Armadillo. The event also included a talk about the history of the show from War Horse’s Assistant Puppetry Director, Matthew Forbes.

 

The puppeteers operating Joey in Glasgow are: Gareth Aled (Head), Michael Taibi (Heart) and Antony Antunes (Hind).

INTERVIEW: Zoe Halliday star of Little Red Riding Hood

Classic kids’ tale with a modern twist, Little Red Riding Hood is coming to Eastwood Park Theatre on Saturday 13 February at 3pm.

From the creative team behind the hugely popular Hairy Maclary Show, Little Red Riding Hood is a fun, original musical for children, with live music and loveable characters.

The show has toured from Edinburgh to Hong Kong and Singapore and comes to Eastwood Park Theatre as part of its 45th anniversary programme.

Recommended for pre-school children, the show features a forest full of family fun as Scarlet and her side-kick Stanley the Squirrel try to outwit Walter the Wolf. 

Zoe Halliday, from Milton on Campsie, studied at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland’s musical theatre course. She will play the lead role of Scarlet and Glasgow Theatre Blog caught up with Zoe to find out about the show.

Tell us a little bit about the play.

The play follows the story of 16yr old Scarlet who is lives in the woods with her father. Not having many friends and feeling a bit alone has left Scarlet longing for an adventure which falls into her lap (literally) in the form of letter from her grandfather. After some indecision about her own bravery Scarlet embarks on the quest her grandfather has sent her. Along the way she meets some wonderful forest friends including Stanley the Squirrel but also faces someone hairy not so nice enemies! The story is a whirl wind of adventure with catchy tunes all the way!

And your role…

I play the fearless “Scarlet”

How has the play been received so far, has it been different in different locations?

The play did a run over Christmas at  Roxy Assembly in Edinburgh. The audiences were fantastic and got right into the spirit of the show by singing along and joining in the madness.

What is life like backstage on tour?

It is exciting! Every day we are in a different theatre/venue and face whatever challenges that presents. Whilst it can be hard going being away from family and friends we have become really close as a cast and always manage to have a laugh! Bringing the show to new audiences every day is really special and even better when you have a strong, fun filled cast.

Touring can be demanding, how do you keep your performance fresh/look after yourself when you’re having to travel as well as perform on stage at night?

I wish I could say I eat lots of vegetables and exercise regularly but that would be a lie. The performance is fresh every day because it’s my job and I love doing it. That and some orange Lucozade and we are laughing.

Can we go back a bit and talk about what inspired you to become an actor and the path you took to become one?

I decided I wanted to become an actor very early on. I loved dancing as a young child  and was inspired by my mum who had her own dance school. I had grown up with old school musicals and dance films.  I think I watched Seven Brides for Seven Brothers so many times the video broke!

When my parents put me in stage school at 10 it just all made sense.

At the age of 13 I was one the first cohort of the Preparatory Musical Theatre programme at the Dance School of Scotland were I studied all through my high school years. I then went onto study a BA in Musical Theatre at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland at just 17yrs old.

Any advice for aspiring performers?

If you really want it, it is worth waiting for. The performing arts is an extremely hard industry but worth every ounce of effort!

Finally, why should people come along to see the play? and where else can we see it?

You should come and see Little Red Riding Hood for some exciting, fun and catchy enjoyment! Life isn’t as fun without a little adventure!

Tickets for Little Red Riding Hood are priced £10 standard and £8 concession, available from eastwoodparktheatre.co.uk/boxoffice.

 

 

INTERVIEW: Paul Beeson on playing Robert Burns in Ae Fond Kiss at Eastwood Park

The first tour of new Robert Burns show Ae Fond Kiss, is touring around Scotland this February. Featuring many of Burns’ famous poems and songs, including Red, Red Rose, Ae Fond Kiss and Auld Lang Syne, it will be a show to remember whether you love literature or just want to find out a bit more about the Bard.

Rabbie Burns is played by Paul Beeson who will guide you through the show with amusing and poignant interactions with key characters, played by cast members Gilchrist Muir, Shawney Henderson and Zoe Halliday. Glasgow Theatre Blog had the chance to catch up with Paul to answer some quick questions about the show.

Tell us a little bit about the play.

Ae Fond Kiss is a play with songs that tells the fascinating story of the life of Robert Burns. It does this using modern original verse, interspersed with Burns’ traditional writing and songs; a Burns’ Greatest Hits if you will! We get to meet the family, friends and (many) women who shaped his life and work along the way.

And your role…

I play Robert Burns himself, at various ages and stages of his life… it is a challenging role but one I am relishing playing!

How has the play been received so far, has it been different in different locations?

The last time the play was produced was nine years ago during the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, where it was performed at the Mining Museum in Newtongrange. It was received extremely well then; however being outside the city centre meant it did not get the audience it truly deserved. This newly staged version boasts a completely new set and directorial approach, and will touring in major venues across the country.

What is life like backstage on tour?

Being part of a small-scale touring company is incredibly rewarding and so much fun – if a little challenging at times! The cast and stage manager are responsible for driving the tour vans between venues, unloading and building the set before a performance and loading the set back in the vans afterwards… oh, and performing of course! It’s a valuable experience, as everyone involved takes ownership of the production to make it the best it can be and becomes completely invested in it. You do feel like you are in a little tour bubble at times, as you are living the show (and in each other’s pockets) almost 24 hours a day… but that’s why we love it so! Your cast mates become like family and some of my greatest friendships have been made this way.

Touring can be demanding, how do you keep your performance fresh/look after yourself when you’re having to travel as well as perform on stage at night?

Every audience is different and responds in different ways… some are incredibly noisy and responsive, some are absolutely silent! As performers, we respond to the energy the audience creates and feed off it, so every performance is fresh in that respect. Also, when you get on the road after the rehearsal process, you start to find the moments that the audience really love and perhaps moments that pass them by. We have to tweak moments like these to ensure we are doing the piece justice and that can keep us on our toes!

As for looking after yourself, it’s finding a balance in your touring life… Eating healthily can be tough when the only eatery near your hotel is a fast food joint! I try to make sure I get enough sleep, drink lots of water, eat a banana for energy and regularly steam the vocal chords… and you just have to be careful that the post-show socialising doesn’t get too out of hand!

Can we go back a bit and talk about what inspired you to become an actor and the path you took to become one?

I chose to do Higher Drama when I was in 6th year at high school. I had no aspirations, needed another subject to study and thought Drama would be fun (and if I’m completely honest, a bit of a skive!) After the first few lessons, I realised how much fun it was and it was far from being easy… it was also the first time in my life I found something I felt I was really good at and capable of taking further. A good friend of mine had left school a couple of years before and done a Year Out Drama course in Stratford-Upon-Avon. So, after I left school, I applied and was accepted, then progressed to Drama college the following year.

I became a Drama teacher a few years after graduating, as I struggled to find work and decided to get a full time job where I could use my skills. I taught for ten years before getting back into performing. Towards the end of my teaching career, I began dabbling in amateur theatre and remembered my love of performing… the pull was too much for me!

Any advice for aspiring performers?

It may be a cliché, but never give up, believe in yourself and be prepared to work extremely hard! When I first left college, I think I was too lazy to truly pursue a career in performing… you have to be proactive, the work won’t come to you! Every performer is unique, so play to your strengths. Do not shy away from what makes you ‘you’. Take risks when you can… Despite my performing experience, I had a fear of singing in front of an audience until very recently… and I am 38! I have had to work very hard to get past that and I am all the better for it.

Finally, why should people come along to see the play? and where else can we see it?

Ae Fond Kiss has everything; it’s entertaining, heartfelt, funny, sentimental, sad, exciting… it is crammed full of facts about Burns’ life, so everyone will learn something they never knew before… some of the poems and songs will be familiar to the audience and participation is encouraged… and everyone loves a bit of Burns don’t they!

Ae Fond Kiss is touring around Scotland this February and comes to Eastwood Park Theatre on Tuesday 13 February. Tickets cost £15 standard and £12 for concessions and are available to book now: www.eastwoodparktheatre.co.uk/boxoffice.