Tag Archives: Theatre

WHAT’S ON JUNE & JULY: Neil Simon’s The Odd Couple at EK Arts Centre and Webster’s Glasgow

odd couple logo

Fussy Felix and slovenly Oscar. Two mismatched roommates. What could possibly go wrong? Join Half•Wits Theatre Company for a hilarious night in the classic buddy comedy from Neil Simon, one of America’s greatest writers. From the team that brought you the sell-out successes Glengarry Glen Ross, Rope and Reasons To Be Pretty, this is sure to be a hot ticket for summer.

East Kilbride Arts Centre from the 14th-16th of June

Webster’s Theatre, Glasgow from the 4-7th of July

 

WHAT’S ON JUNE: Rock and Roll Revolution: The Bluejays

Friday 29 June, 7.30pm

The Bluejays (Winners of the National Vintage Award forBest Band) present an electrifying and authentic tribute to the era when music changed the world forever.

Between 1955 and 1959, artists such as Elvis Presley, Buddy Holly, Chuck Berry, The Everly Brothers, Eddie Cochran and Little Richard not only transformed the musical landscape but also the way we continue to look at the world today.

Much more than just a concert show, The Bluejays take you on a historical journey via breathtaking renditions of the biggest hits of the era (Rock Around The Clock, That’s All Right, That’ll Be The Day, Tutti Frutti, Summertime Blues, Johnny B. Goode, Wake Up Little Susie, La Bamba, A Teenager In Love and many more) and reveal how the Rock ‘n’ Roll movement brought about a dream of equality and freedom that we still chase to this day.

“The Bluejays had the room jiving their fluorescent socks off!” – Howard Goodall, Composer

Price

  • Standard £20
  • Concession £18

Take a group of 10 people and one person can go free.

WHAT’S ON MAY: Ray Cooney’s It Runs in the Family at EK Arts Centre

Lanarkshire Little Theatre
It Runs in the Family

By Ray Cooney

EAST KILBRIDE ARTS CENTRE

Thursday 25 May – Saturday 27 May 2017 / 8.00pm
£10.00 / £8.00

Just as Dr David Mortimer is about to deliver the most important lecture of his life, ex-girlfriend Jane Tate turns up with a shocking revelation.

As he tries to hold together his career and his marriage he turns for help to his faithful friend and fellow doctor. Chaos ensues!

This is farce at its best as the situation spins hilariously out of control in typical Ray Cooney fashion.

REVIEW: A Steady Rain – Tron Theatre, Glasgow

Despite the predictability of the script, Robert Jack and Andy Clark’s powerhouse performances elevate Keith Huff’s A Steady Rain above and beyond the average police drama.

Inspired by a real-life event in the story of US serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer, Denny (Clark) and Joey (Jack), two Chicago cops and life-long friends, have to deal with the fall-out, both personally and professionally from a catastrophic misjudgement while on duty.

There’s a danger that the well-worn subject matter could easily descend into cliche, and its portrayal of a certain type of masculinity, now largely unpalatable, is often predictable, but you can’t help admire the sheer volume and denseness of dialogue and the believability with which Clark and Jack deliver it. Gripping and satisfying thanks largely to the skill of two highly talented actors.

REVIEW: Frances and Ethel – Oran Mor, Glasgow

Performing from the age of two, popping pills supplied by her mother at ten, surviving the scandal of her father’s indiscretions by moving from Michigan to Hollywood where she was signed by MGM at just 13 years old, and a lifetime of criticism about her looks, the sad and sorry private life of screen legend Judy Garland has proven to be fertile theatrical fodder over the years.

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David Cosgrove’s Frances and Ethel takes place in a shabby rehearsal room in New York on the eve of Garland’s legendary 1961 Carnegie Hall concert. With her old pal, pianist Sal, she reminisces on the events that have steered her to this point, chiefly the dysfunctional relationship with the woman she dubbed “the real Wicked Witch of the West”, her steely, ultra-ambitious mother, Ethel.

While Cosgrove’s short, sweet play offers no new insight into Garland’s life, it does win big with the casting of Frances Thorburn as Judy, Thorburn’s voice is eerily evocative of the legendary singer. Dubbed a mini-musical, in Oran Mor’s summer season, the production is rather light on musical numbers, but those it does feature are glorious. An engaging addition to the legend of Judy Garland.

 

REVIEW: Pippin – C, Edinburgh

The tale of a fictitious medieval prince and his search for the meaning of life is unlikely source material for a musical. A favourite of US amateur and school theatre groups, Stephen Schwartz and Roger O. Hirson’sPippin had its last professional outing in the UK in 1973 and on Broadway in 2014, where it’s big-top staging was highly lauded by both audience and critic alike.

Often overlooked for its 70s pop/rock score and lacklustre book, the music has the same hippy-dippy, student production origins as Schwartz’s earlier work, Godspell. Here, in the hands of Cambridge University Musical Theatre Society, it returns firmly to its roots. No big top, no acrobatics, with just three lidded, wooden boxes and a few drapes, this hugely talented ensemble manage to deliver a cohesive and entirely absorbing production of this seldom-seen work.

The direction at the hands of John King is tight and fluid, transitions are smoothly achieved and there are some nice touches peppered throughout to enliven the staging: shadow puppetry, inventive movement sequences and pseudo-Edwardian costumes that are easy on the eye.

Central to the production’s success is its cast. Universally fine-voiced, it seems churlish to single any out; however, mention must be made of Megan Henson (Charlemagne) who is stunningly gifted as both actress and singer and Oli MacFarlane whose Pippin is beautifully judged. Strong support comes too from Caroline Sautter (a brunette Kerry Ellis look-alike) as the charismatic narrator.

Given a bigger budget and a professional venue, this would give many touring musicals a run for their money. A triumph of strong direction, clear artistic vision and a stand-out cast has produced one of the must-see shows of the Fringe.

Runs until August 31, 2015

Image: Johannes Hjorth

This review was originally published at: http://www.thepublicreviews.com/pippin-c-edinburgh/