Tag Archives: The Tempest

NEWS: Bard in the Botanics 2022 Season programme announced

Bard in the Botanics has released details of the 2022 Season. Featuring four contrasting productions the popular Glasgow event will run from Friday 22 June – Saturday 30 July and see a welcome return to the Kibble Palace after two years which saw it unavailable due to Covid restrictions.

The 2022 season opens with a new production of the evergreen favourite, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (22 June – 9 July) directed by Jennifer Dick and starring Robert Elkin as Bottom. This will be Bard’s first mainstage production of the play in over a decade.

The opening show in the Kibble (23 June – 9 July) is the culmination of three years planning. Gordon Barr will direct a new version of Euripides’ Medea commissioned by Bard in the Botanics from playwright, Kathy McKean. It has been devised specifically for acclaimed actor Nicole Cooper and for performance in the Kibble Palace. This will be the Bard in the Botanics first foray into Greek tragedy.

The second half of the season (14 – 30 July) sees Cooper make her directorial debut with a new production of The Tempest staged in the Kibble Palace and featuring Alan Steele as Prospero. The line-up for the 2022 season is completed with a new production of Gordon Barr’s ground-breaking take on Much Ado About Nothing. Bertram and Benedick return to the mainstage as the gay couple at the heart of this, the original rom-com with a twist with Robert Elkin once again in the role of Bertram.

“We are delighted to be returning to The Kibble Palace for this year’s season with productions that showcase the dramatic talent of one of Bard’s long-time core artists, Nicole Cooper ” says Bard in the Botanics’ Artistic Director, Gordon Barr.

“We have been planning our first foray into Greek tragedy for three years and it is exciting to see this idea now coming to fruition. Working with Kathy McKean, whose version of Medea has been conceived not only for the Kibble, but especially for Nicole, is a tremendous pleasure.”

“Nicole will also make her directorial debut with Bard this year, creating a new version of Shakespeare’s final play, The Tempest. She has adapted the play using the unique backdrop of the historic glasshouse and tapping in to the emotions felt by so many people now as they experience the disintegration caused by dementia.”

“For our mainstage shows comedy will be to the fore this year,” he adds. “It is over a decade since we presented a mainstage version of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, so the time was absolutely right to return to this ever popular play in a new version directed by Jennifer Dick. In the second half of the season we will revisit our particular take on Much Ado About Nothing bringing Bertram and Benedick back to the stage in a brand new production.”

Tickets for Bard in the Botanics Antic Fables & Fairy Toys season go on sale soon and will be available via www.bardinthebotanics.co.uk

Listings

 

24 June – 9 July 2022 at 7.45pm (no performances Sundays/Mondays)

Previews: 22 and 23 June at 7.45pm

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM

Directed by Jennifer Dick

Mainstage: Botanic Gardens, Great Western Road, Glasgow, G12

 

Bard in the Botanics presents its first new mainstage production of Shakespeare’s evergreen classic in over a decade. A celebration of our freedom of expression – the right to love who we want, create what we want and be what we want – this new version features Robert Elkin as Bottom.

 

Tickets 

£25, £17 (Disabled / Student / Unemployed), £12 (Under 18s and Equity / BECTU members)

Previews and Discount Tuesday: all tickets £17

www.bardinthebotanics.co.uk

24 June – 9 July at 8pm (no performances Sundays/Mondays)

Preview 23 June at 8pm

MEDEA

By Euripides in a version by Kathy McKean

Directed by Gordon Barr

The Kibble Palace: Botanic Gardens, Great Western Road, Glasgow, G12

 

Erased from the narrative – abandoned by her husband, Jason, for a new wife and a new life – left isolated and alone in a city where she does not and cannot belong – Medea begins to plot revenge – a terrible, bloody revenge that will send a howl of rage echoing through the ages. Three years in the planning this specially commissioned version of Euripides’ classic by Kathy McKean, stars award-winning actor, Nicole Cooper, in the title role.

Tickets

£25, £17 (Disabled / Student / Unemployed), £12 (Equity / BECTU members)

Previews and Discount Tuesday: all tickets £17

www.bardinthebotanics.co.uk

15 – 30 July at 7.45pm (no performances Sundays/Mondays)

Preview 14 July at 7.45pm

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING

Directed by Gordon Barr

 

Mainstage: Botanic Gardens, Great Western Road, Glasgow, G12

Bertram and Benedick return to the mainstage as the gay couple at the heart of this, the original rom-com with a twist in a brand new production of Bard in the Botanics’ ground-breaking take on Much Ado About Nothing . Robert Elkin once again plays the role of Bertram.

Tickets

£25, £17 (Disabled / Student / Unemployed), £12 (Under 18s and Equity / BECTU members)

Previews and Discount Tuesday: all tickets £17

www.bardinthebotanics.co.uk

15 – 30 July at 8pm (no performances Sundays/Mondays)

Preview 14 July at 8pm

THE TEMPEST

Adapted & directed by Nicole Cooper

The Kibble Palace: Botanic Gardens, Great Western Road, Glasgow, G12

 

On an enchanted island, a mighty magician raises a terrible storm and plots revenge on those who have wronged him. In a solitary glasshouse, a daughter must learn to say goodbye to the father she has known and loved as a terrible illness takes hold of him. Acclaimed actor, Nicole Cooper, makes her Bard in the Botanics’ directorial debut with this new production of Shakespeare’s last play featuring Alan Steele as Prospero.

Tickets

£25, £17 (Disabled / Student / Unemployed), £12 (Equity / BECTU members)

Previews and Discount Tuesday: all tickets £17

www.bardinthebotanics.co.uk

REVIEW: The Tempest – Tron Theatre, Glasgow

This review was originaly written for and published by The Public Reviews at:

http://www.thepublicreviews.com/the-tempest-tron-theatre-glasgow/

Writer: William Shakespeare

Director: Andy Arnold

Design: Hazel Blue

Lighting Design: Sergey Jakovsky

Sound Design: Barry McCall

Tron Artistic Director Andy Arnold directs a predominantly female cast from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland’s MA Classical and Contemporary Text programme, in this his Mayfesto production of The Tempest: Shakespeare’s tale of magic, morality, love and betrayal.

While the programme notes state ‘the text has been slightly edited’, it manages to stick largely to Shakespeare’s original whilst giving greater focus to the themes of colonisation which exist in the text: indeed in this production the play’s first and last words are given over to Martinican poet, politician and denouncer of colonial racism, Aimé Césaire. These judicious cuts result in a lively and engaging production which whips along at a cracking pace.

The production scores highly on atmosphere: Hazel Blue’s inventive staging, an earthy hued island with a skeleton of a high-masted sailing ship, provides enough interest for the eye without detracting from the action and is complemented well by Sergey Jakovsky’s effective lighting design. However it must be said that Barry McCall’s sound design whilst evocative, often drowns out whole patches of dialogue, whether this is down to poor enunciation on the part of the actors or a heavy-hand on the volume button one cannot tell.

Arnold’s nimble direction showcases the skill of his actors and keeps the interest levels high throughout; indeed he manages to elicit some beautifully measured performances and a United Nations of accents from this youthful cast. Standout among them Rebecca Murphy as Prospero, who delivers a perfectly controlled central performance, though her extremely strident Australian accent sometimes consigns some of Prospero’s most notable lines to the winds. Kenny Boyle’s Ariel is a less sulky characterisation than the usual and his mastery of the ethereal other-worldliness of the sprightly spirit is captivating. The two are ably supported by the rest of the company, most noteworthy among them Flora Sowerby’s Cockney wide-boy Stephano and Amy Drummond’s Welsh Valley Trinculo, who provide the high comedy of the piece. There is also a more thoughtful and dignified portrayal  of the native, enslaved Caliban from Renee Williams.

This is a refreshing departure from the more traditional stagings of the play and the perfect showcase for these young actors at the start of their careers. A vibrant re-telling of the tale, visually pleasing, bristling with life and with some new food for thought thrown in. Well worth catching if you can.

Runs until 16th May 2014