Tag Archives: Scott Fletcher

WHAT’S ON DECEMBER: The Magical Adventures of Pinocchio

Following the success of last year’s production Cinderella, The Pavilion have decided to take the team on another Panto adventure.

The production team have said: “It has been one of our favourites over the years and we think that we are the only theatre in the country to produce The Magical Adventures of Pinocchio. As always, we base our Pantomime on the original story but have that Glasgow twist in true Pavilion style and you can be confident that it is Good Clean Family Entertainment.”

It is sure to be a Sing-A-Long, Join In Adventure with an all star cast, a brand new script, stunning scenery, sensational costumes and magical special effects that they have become known for.

There are Generous Discounts and Concessions available at all performances.

28 Nov 2019 – 12 Jan 2020

More info here: https://www.paviliontheatre.co.uk/shows/the-magical-adventures-of-pinocchio/

REVIEW: Gary Tank Commander – Mission Quite Possible, The SSE Hydro, Glasgow

There’s an air of trepidation as you approach Glasgow’s massive Hydro arena, just how well would one of Scotland’s best-loved TV comedies Gary Tank Commander translate to the (massive) stage? Well, in the hands of comedy genius Greg McHugh, brilliantly is the answer.

Hapless, naive and utterly loveable national treasure Gary and his mates in the “armeh”, parachute into their Afghan camp and deliver their usual brand of madness and mayhem featuring camels, chaos, cheesy pasta and chips.

With appeals not to give too much away, this is a story of heroism and doing the right thing – two things not entirely easy for our Gary.

Huge credit must go to McHugh’s script which sustains the laughs over a two hour period and while there a few little lulls it really is hysterically funny. The set design is also worthy of mention, cleverly filling the huge stage.

Like it’s predecessor that transitioned from TV to the stage Still Game, the resounding success of this live show will hopefully mean a return to the small screen for Gary and the gang. Based on the reaction of this audience alone, the BBC would be foolish not to bring it back.

Image: Martin Shields

REVIEW: The Slab Boys – Citizens Theatre, Glasgow

This article was originally written for and published by The Public Reviews at: http://www.thepublicreviews.com/the-slab-boys-citizens-theatre-glasgow/

There will be few productions in Scotland this year that will be met with more anticipation than the Citizens Theatre revival of John Byrne’s seminal work The Slab Boys. 37 years on from its debut at the Traverse in Edinburgh, original director David Hayman and creator John Byrne reunite to celebrate the Citz 70th year. Mythologised as the play that inspired an entire generation of Scottish writers and performers, the question is: does it stand up to its reputation and regard?

It’s 1957, a typical Friday in a Paisley carpet factory, despite the slate grey surroundings, the seeds of teenage rebellion fester under posters of James Dean and Elvis: “Slab Boys” Phil (Sammy Hayman) and Spanky (Jamie Quinn) rail against both the establishment and circumstance, yearning for a life outside the confines of the “slab room”where their days are spent mixing paint. Whilst Phil dreams of entrance into art school, Spanky wants to make it to a desk in the design room, but the pair’s energies seem to be wholly invested in relentlessly tormenting any and all visitors to their domain, especially their fellow “slab boy” Hector (Scott Fletcher).

Fans will be happy to know that the play retains much of its original allure: Byrne’s brilliantly observed dialogue comes across as razor sharp as it always has, and the work remains one of the finest examples of ensemble theatre. The audience still laughs at the cruelty of Spanky and Phil, but it must be said, in these days of political correctness, there are points where you are left wondering whether to laugh or squirm in discomfort at the relentless torment, even talk of Phil’s mother’s mental illness is delivered with a barrage of cruel barbs. But however brutal the ribbing gets, there is an understanding that it is very much a defence and when the chips are down the pair still have enough heart to rally to the aid of the unfortunate Hector.

There are a brace of fine performances here: director Hayman delivers a sure-footed turn as bombastic factory manager Willie Currie; Jamie Quinn’s Spanky has all the swagger of the typical west of Scotland wide-boy and Kieran Baker’s middle class Alan, is a perfectly pitched foil for the coarse central duo; Scott Fletcher too, is irresistible (not to mention hysterical) as the naive Hector. However, less successful is Sammy Hayman’s Phil: whether it’s nerves, inexperience, bad diction or miscasting, Hayman Jr’s dialogue, delivered at machine gun fire pace, is often lost into the ether, and while he perfectly captures the brutality and callousness of Phil, he fails to bring the required charm that elevates the role to one of the best in Scottish theatre.

David Hayman’s production is sure-footed but one gripe would be the length of the piece, it would benefit from judicious trimming to make it even tighter, the inevitable climax is a little long in coming, but that said it remains unfailingly entertaining throughout.

A solid and satisfying production with plenty of laugh-out loud humour, but lacking that certain something that makes for brilliance.

Runs until Saturday 7 March 2015 then touring