Tag Archives: King’s Theatre

NEWS: Capital Theatres in Edinburgh appoints new Chief Executive Officer

Capital Theatres is delighted to announce that Fiona Gibson has been appointed as the new Chief Executive Officer to lead the charitable trust that runs Edinburgh’s Festival and King’s Theatres and The Studio.

Fiona is currently Interim Chief Executive for the Everyman and Playhouse Theatres in Liverpool and is the former Business Director of Octagon Theatre, Bolton. She has extensive experience as a Business Change Leader both in theatre and consulting cross-industry, delivering significant projects across a range of sectors including the arts, retail, hospitality, consumer goods, utilities, chemicals, automotive and construction.

Born and raised in Glasgow, Fiona studied Psychology & Drama at Glasgow University. She will be relocating to Edinburgh to take on the role and will take up post on 20th April 2020 following the retirement of the current Chief Executive, Duncan Hendry, in December 2019.

On announcing the news, Chair of the Board, Professor Dame Joan Stringer said: ‘Fiona brings an exceptional skillset and a broad range of experience, working across a number of sectors, arts and business. As we look to the start of our £25m redevelopment of the King’s Theatre with building works commencing in 2021, Fiona will provide inspirational leadership to continue the success of Capital Theatres into its next exciting era.’

On her appointment to the role of Chief Executive, Fiona Gibson said: ‘What an amazing time to be joining this wonderful, world renowned institution.  Capital Theatres sits at the heart of culture in Scotland, and I am privileged to be taking over the reins at such an exciting period of change.  With two beautiful heritage buildings, along with a stunning Studio, and a programme of work that is the envy of the sector, I have a lot to thank Duncan for.  He should be rightly proud of his legacy, and I look forward to returning to my Scottish roots, continuing his great work and collaborating with you all to take Capital Theatres to the next level’

NEWS: Full casting announced for new tour of Beautiful

Following a highly successful run at the King’s Theatre in Glasgow in February 2018, Paul Blake, Sony/ATV Music Publishing and Mike Bosner in association with Michael Harrison are delighted to announce that the Olivier, Tony and Grammy award-winning BEAUTIFUL – THE CAROLE KING MUSICAL will return to the city next year.

Starring Daisy Wood-Davis as Carole King, the acclaimed production, which tells the inspiring true story of King’s remarkable rise to stardom, will open on Tuesday 26 May until Saturday 30 May 2020.

Daisy Wood-Davis will be joined by Adam Gillian as King’s husband and song-writing partner Gerry Goffin, Laura Baldwin as song-writer Cynthia Weil, Cameron Sharp as song-writer Barry Mann, Susie Fenwick as King’s mother Genie Klein and Oliver Boot as music publisher and producer Donnie Kirshner. At certain performances, Carole King will be played by Vicki Manser.

The cast is completed by Toyan Thomas-Browne, Reece Budin, Ronald Brian, Carly Cook, Julia Dray, Jordan Fox, Louise Francis, Chloe Gentles, Katrina May, Grant McConvey, Jacob McIntosh, Samuel Nicholas, Leah St Luce, Mica Townsend and Damien Winchester.

Daisy Wood-Davis is probably best known as Kim Butterfield in Channel 4’s Hollyoaks. Her other TV credits include Tansy Meadow in EastEnders and Phoebe Crowhurst in Holby City. Daisy’s theatre credits include Laura in Dreamboats and Petticoats in the West End and on tour, Janet in the European tour of The Rocky Horror Show and most recently Sheila in the UK tour of Hair.

Adam Gillian trained at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland. He has appeared in Hadestown at the National Theatre and Refresh at the Underbelly Festival.

Laura Baldwin can currently be seen as Dawn in the original London company of Waitress at the Adelphi Theatre. Her other theatre credits include Janey in Eugenius! and Story Sandra in Big Fish, both at The Other Palace.

Cameron Sharp played Theo in the original London cast of School of Rock at the Gillian Lynne Theatre. His other West End credits include Drew in Rock of Ages at the Garrick Theatre. He has also appeared in Jesus Christ Superstar at Regent’s Park Open Air Theatre and the national tour of Avenue Q.

Susie Fenwick’s many West End credits include Sister Margaretta in The Sound of Music at the London Palladium, The Woman in White at the Palace Theatre, Jennyanydots in Cats at the New London Theatre, Beauty and the Beast at the Dominion Theatre, Copacabana and Aspects of Love, both at the Prince of Wales Theatre and Les Misèrables at the Palace Theatre.

Oliver Boot’s many credits include The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time at the National Theatre and on tour, the European premiere of Finding Neverland at Leicester Curve, Antony and Cleopatra, A Midsummer Night’s Dream and King Lear, all at Shakespeare’s Globe and the national tours of Hay Fever and Bedroom Farce.

BEAUTIFUL – THE CAROLE KING MUSICAL

King’s Theatre, Glasgow

Tue 26 – Sat 30 May

Tue – Sat, 7.30pm

Wed, Thu & Sat: 2,30pm

www.atgtickets.com/glasgow

0844 871 7648

NEWS: Footloose returns in 2020

Footloose The Musical . The musical is set to burst back onto stage in 2020 opening at the New Wimbledon Theatre 24 April 2020before an extensive UK tour. With additional casting to follow, it is announced that Gareth Gates will reprise his role as Willard.

The show visits Glasgow from 3rd August 2020.     

Gareth Gates rose to fame through the inaugural series of Pop Idol in 2002, going on to sell over 5 million records worldwide and have hits across the globe. His version of Unchained Melody sold over a million copies in the UK and is the 3rd best-selling single of the Noughties. Gareth is also the youngest ever-male solo artist to debut at number 1. More recently Gareth has enjoyed a successful career on stage, with credits including Les Misérables, Legally Blonde and Joseph and the Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat. In 2014 Gareth appeared in the final series of Dancing on Ice, and joined boyband 5th Story as part of ITVs second series of The Big Reunion, touring arenas with bands including Blue and Five.

Gareth says “I’m thrilled to be back playing the role of Willard in the 2020 UK tour of Footloose. I had so much fun the first time around that I jumped at the chance to play such an exciting role again. I was born in 1984, the year ‘Footloose’ the movie was first released; I used to watch the movie lots as a kid not knowing some years later I’d be playing the ‘cowboy that can’t dance’ on stages up and down the country. I’m a terrible dancer, so it’s pretty much Life imitating Art!”

“The show is packed with classic 80s hits – and audiences get to see a little more of me than they bargained for! I can’t wait to be back on tour with such an incredible show”

 City boy Ren thinks life is bad enough when he’s forced to move to a rural backwater in America. But his world comes to a standstill when he arrives at Bomont to find dancing and rock music are banned. Taking matters into his own hands, soon Ren has all hell breaking loose and the whole town on its feet. Based on the 1980s screen sensation which took the world by storm, Footloose The Musical sizzles with spirit, fun and the best in UK musical talent. With cutting edge modern choreography, you’ll enjoy classic 80s hits including Holding Out for a Hero, Almost Paradise, Let’s Hear It For The Boy and of course the unforgettable title track Footloose

Footloose The Musical will be presented by Selladoor Productions in association with Runaway Entertainment, and will be directed by Racky Plews, with choreography from Matt Cole, musical supervision by Mark Crossland and design by Sara Perks. 

Glasgow King’s Theatre*

https://www.atgtickets.com/venues/kings-theatre-glasgow/

Telephone Booking: 0844 871 7648

Calls cost 7p per minute, plus your phone company’s access charge.

REVIEW: Motown the Musical – King’s Theatre, Glasgow

Eight hundred dollars, a loan from his family, was all it took for Berry Gordy to set up the legendary Motown Records. Flash forward to 1983, and the eve of Motown’s 25th anniversary. Gordy is reflecting on his career at a point where the label is in deep decline, it’s biggest stars having left for better deals with bigger bucks. He sits at home deciding whether to attend the celebration in his honour. Thankfully, this self-reflection takes us back, right back to Detroit and the foundations of Hitsville USA and to those sublime, timeless tunes – an astonishing 57 number one hits.

And thank goodness for those hits, essentially, Motown the Musical is an extremely sanitised version of events written by Gordy himself. While it tracks Gordy’s infamous and adulterous relationship with Diana Ross (which produced a child, of whom there’s no mention here) at exasperating length, and tries to tackle some more serious themes of the era: JFK’s assassination, Vietnam, the race riots, its clunky and often embarrassingly simplistic script suffers badly in order to shoe-in another hit, it’s choc-full of cheesy lines: “that little Stevie is a wonder” as Wonder appears as a child with his head bobbing wildly (cringe). In sharp contrast, many recent jukebox musicals have managed to weave a decent story around the songs, Jersey Boys, Beautiful and Sunny Afternoon to name a few. It’s very much greatest hits and an exceedingly lazy script, and many of these glorious songs are frustratingly truncated, however, if you revel in the music alone, and the sheer number of songs (50) then you are in for an entertaining evening. 

The set is sparse and simplistic and complemented by colourful projections, so it’s down to the hard-working cast to deliver the goods. The  large ensemble double and triple-up (and more) as the rest of the fabulous Motown roster, including Stevie Wonder, Martha and the Vandellas, Mary Wells, The Jackson 5 and The Temptations, now stars of their own hit Broadway musical and writers Holland, Dozier, Holland, and do so with energy. Those with a larger role are Shak Gabbidon-Williams, a fine singer, as a conflicted Marvin Gaye and Nathan Lewis as Gordy’s life-long friend Smokey Robinson. Karis Anderson is a competent singer but her portrayal of Diana Ross neither sounds/acts or looks like the diva and the time spent in this already long musical to her relationship with Gordy, seriously outstays its welcome. The audience is left asking why are these greatest hits are being severely cut short when we are subjected to this mortifying cheese-fest. It also needs to be said that this is quite possibly the worst diction this reviewer has heard in many a year.

It skims the surface of Motown’s move from Detroit to Los Angeles and Gordy’s insistence on mainstreaming or prematurely ageing his young and hip roster into old-fashioned middle of the road entertainers. Ultimately the move signified the loss of credibility and cool of the label.

The directorial choices are also somewhat baffling. It doesn’t know whether it wants to be a tribute concert or a musical (there’s some audience interaction which entirely breaks down the fourth wall), which means the audience is unclear how to behave – it has arrived in Glasgow on the back of some controversy at a previous venue where audience members were asked to leave due to rowdy, concert-goer behaviour, as the rest of the audience had paid their hard-earned cash to enjoy the musical’s storyline as well as music. Unfortunately the problems seem to have travelled with it. The show is prefaced by an announcement to respect other audience members (unheard of in the venue), which is duly ignored by a section of the audience who are here for a sing-along, and who then cause major disruption as they refuse to leave when their behaviour is challenged by fellow audience members and staff of the venue. Props to the cast who manage to ignore the off-stage drama.

These songs are some of the finest ever written, performed by some of the most talented artists of all time, and the cast largely deliver, of that there’s no question, but this quite frankly awful script lets these talented performers and the Motown legacy down pretty badly.

Runs until 2 November 2019 | Image: Tristram Kenton 

REVIEW: 9 to 5 – King’s Theatre, Glasgow

9 to 5, the 2008 musical based on the hit 1980 movie starring Dolly Parton, Lily Tomlin and Jane Fonda, would seem on the surface to be a strange choice for a West End revival and UK tour in 2019. In the era of #MeToo, it appears that too often that even the most questionable content can be given a free pass if it marks itself as a period piece, is given a glossy coating, has some jolly songs and is marketed as supposedly raising issues of gender equality and sexual politics, even if its done in the dodgiest of fashions. Thankfully, for the most part, director Jeff Calhoun has managed to address the most unpalatable Carry On-like antics of previous productions.

In a nutshell it’s the story of three office workers: Doralee (Georgina Castle), Judy (Amber Davies) and Violet (Louise Redknapp) who unite to turn the tables on their monstrous boss (Sean Needham), tying him up in his own bondage gear and running the office where they work under their own rules.

It is a show of two unequal halves, both literally and figuratively, the first running at one hour ten minutes and packed full of action, the second at a short 45 minutes is actually padded out with some unnecessary songs then rushes to a conclusion that neatly wraps up the action. The entire show is stylistically a bit unimaginative, it takes the stereotypical eye-poppingly colourful 80s look but doesn’t do too much with it, there are a few key set-pieces that are wheeled on and off multiple times. It is all perfectly pleasant but no more than that.

Both Davies and Castle are supremely talented, Davies’ rendition of the Defying Gravity-like Get Out and Stay Out is a show-stopper as is Castle’s Backwoods Barbie and to his great credit, Sean Needham manages to keep tyrannical, misogynistic, panto villain boss Franklin Hart Jnr. entirely likeable. Less successful, though is Redknapp, who, while competent in the pivotal role, is a little lacklustre in her energy level and her voice suffers in comparison to her co-stars. It also needs to be said that the shrillness of the dialogue and the uneven American accents mean that a lot of the jokes fail to land as the audience can’t actually hear them clearly.

While on the surface it may aim to be a rallying cry for working women everywhere, it still retains a few too many mores of 70s and 80s sitcoms. While director Calhoun has managed to negotiate a more palatable path through the material, it might be time for either a bit more of a refresh of the book or a female director. It is interesting to note that the most well rounded, nuanced character is the seemingly ditzy blonde. All that said, if you take it entirely at surface level then it is a bit of fluffy, escapist, crowd-pleasing fun, with a talented and committed cast, and the overwhelmingly female audience seem to adore it, needing no encouragement to get on their feet to sing and dance along with the encore.

Runs until 12 October 2019 | Image: Simon Turtle

Originally written for The Reviews Hub

REVIEW: Grease The Musical – King’s Theatre, Glasgow

The first new production in 25 years, and with the promise of a return to the gritty, raw, original 1971 production, the odds would seem stacked in favour of this Leicester Curve production of Grease, one of the world’s most beloved musicals. However, spectacularly bad casting, lacklustre energy levels and poor vocals, render what should be a corker of a show, into a two and a half hour yawn-fest.

It’s 1959, Rydell High, and a dozen angst ridden teenagers negotiate the ups and downs of high school life: break ups, make ups, peer pressure and pregnancy scares, with a raft of familiar tunes wrapped around the action (if not in the order that fans of the movie are used too).

Principal among the faults of this production is the casting: Dan Partridge’s Danny Zuko is a non-descript leading man, he lacks any presence, his accent is appalling (something that seems endemic in the cast), and his singing voice even worse, and unforgivably there is absolutely no chemistry with the woefully underused Martha Kirby as Sandy, who manages to elevate proceedings in the few occasions she’s on stage. It is absolutely baffling why she would ever fall in love with this loser in the first place. Louis Gaunt is a charismatic Kenickie who makes his mark (the young actor seems as if he would be a much better fit as Danny). Of note too is Natalie Woods, who has a lovely voice and a nice presence as the body-conscious Jan, less successful are Rhianne-Louise McCaulsky as Rizzo, who looks thoroughly bored throughout and Darren Bennett, who provides an uncomfortable watch as the boob-grabbing old letch Vince Fontaine, the performance smacks of 1970s Benny Hill/Freddy Starr, not memories you’d want to evoke in 2019.

Are we are so far removed and so distanced from the times in which this is set, that it fails to resonate? Is that the main issue? There’s a moment in the cheesy dialogue when after a break up and a make up between Danny and Sandy where her asks her: ‘don’t you want my ring?’ you can almost hear the female audience cry: ‘no thanks I’d rather have a career’. The entire show plays out like a badly disjointed series of unrelated scenes and the lack of drive doesn’t help. On a positive note, Colin Richmond’s gymnasium design is effective, if simplistic and Guy Hoare’s lighting design tonally compliments it – it should be said though, that it’s particularly heavy on the dry ice.

The entire production from start to end lacks impact, there isn’t an ounce of sparkle and the lack of energy and commitment of the cast is astonishing. One could argue that it’s impossible to make Grease boring, but boy does this production succeed in achieving just that.

Runs until 31 August 2019 | Image: Manuel Harlan

NEWS: CASTING ANNOUNCED FOR ON YOUR FEET! THE STORY OF EMILIO AND GLORIA ESTEFAN

Casting has been confirmed for ON YOUR FEET! The Story of Emilio and Gloria Estefan, which plays at the King’s Theatre, Glasgow from Monday 2 until Saturday 7 March 2020.

ON YOUR FEET! is the inspiring true love story of Emilio and Gloria and charts their journey from its origins in Cuba, onto the streets of Miami and finally to international superstardom and features some of the most iconic pops songs of the era, including Rhythm is Gonna Get You, Conga, Get On Your Feet, Don’t Want To Lose You and 1-2-3.

Direct from the West End, Philippa Stefani will play Gloria Estefan, George Ioannides Emilio Estefan, Madalena Alberto will play Gloria Fajardo and Karen Mann Consuelo.

Philippa Stefani played ‘Mimi’ in the recent national tour of Rent. She has also played Daniela in In The Heights at King’s Cross Theatre. Her other theatre credits include the original London casts of Wicked at the Apollo Victoria and I Can’t Sing and Sister Act, both at the London Palladium. She has also appeared in High Society at the Old Vic and Ghost at the Piccadilly Theatre.

George Ioannides has appeared in the West End productions of Annie and Mamma Mia! and was most recently seen as Eduardo Cortez in An Officer and a Gentleman at Curve, Leicester and on national tour.

Madalena Alberto’s West End credits include the title role in Evita at the Dominion Theatre and Grizabella in Cats at the London Palladium. She has also appeared as Fantine in the 25th Anniversary tour of Les Miserables and was most recently seen as ‘Giulietta’ in Aspects of Love at the Southwark Playhouse.

Karen Mann’s many credits include Golde in the national tour of Fiddler on the Roof opposite Paul Michael Glaser, Marley in Scrooge at Curve and Mother Superior in Sister Act also at Curve and on national tour. Her extensive work at the Watermill Theatre in Newbury includes Gladys in Copacabana, Viv in Spend Spend Spend and Mrs Lovett in Sweeney Todd, which transferred to both the New Ambassadors Theatre and Trafalgar Studios.

Completing the cast will be Sharif Afifi, Hollie Cassar, Francisco Del Solar, Laura Friedrich Tejero, Francesca Lara Gordon, Yonly Leyva Desdunes, Olivia Kate Holding, Elia Lo Tauro, Gabriella-Rose Marchant, Martin McCarthy, Alicia Mencía, Ciro Lourencio Meulens, Clayton Rosa, Julia Ruiz Fernandez, Slaap, Dawnita Smith, Despina Violari, Nathan Zammit and Alain Zambrana Borges.

Gloria Estefan has sold over 100 million records worldwide and is the most successful Latin crossover performer in the history of pop music.  In addition to her 38 number 1 hits across the Billboard charts, Gloria recorded the Oscar-nominated song ‘Music of My Heart’ and has received numerous honours and awards over the course of her illustrious career. Emilio Estefan is a founding member of the pioneering Miami Sound Machine, who created a brand new Latin crossover sound – fusing infectious Cuban rhythms with American pop and disco. Combined, they have won a staggering 26 Grammy awards.

 

Amélie – King’s Theatre, Glasgow

Amélie:The Musical is based on Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s 2001 Academy Award-winning movie about eternal altruist Amélie Poulain, whose desire to help others, through a series of simple acts of kindness, prevents her from finding love. Amélie escapes her dysfunctional childhood and unhappy home life to work as a waitress in a Paris café where she encounters a rag-tag bunch of bohemian misfits, whose lives she sets out to make that little bit better. This 2019 musical version has been significantly re-worked for the UK tour after a less-than-successful and hugely curtailed run on Broadway in 2017, where it ran for only 56 performances after a hefty 27 days of previews.

Any production has to compete with the visually arresting movie and the tobacco-stained design by Madeleine Girling, with gorgeous lighting by Elliot Griggs, largely succeeds in distancing itself from the iconic big-screen version and establishing itself as its own visual entity. It does however exploit many Gallic clichés in its presentation of the Montmartre café where the action takes place. That said, it is an absolute treat to behold.

The film is a series of quirky vignettes from Amélie’s childhood to her life in Paris (the journey necessary to understand Amélie’s future motivations) and as a result there’s a lot of time spent establishing the back story, resulting in the first act of the musical taking its time to come together and hit its stride. The second act is more cohesive and as a whole it manages to almost replicate the entire movie storyline in the confines of a small-scale, fixed set, an impressive feat.

There are an astonishing 35 musical pieces in total, and if any gripe remains with the show, it’s the lack of variety in style and tone of much of the music, motifs are repeated just a tad too often. Yes, many are gorgeous, and they are perfectly played and sung by the actor/musicians, but many add nothing and arrest the progress of the narrative rather than advance it.

The cast are universally first class, Audrey Brisson (Amélie), a Cirque du Soleil veteran is a less soft but compelling version of our heroine and Danny Mac as the object of her unrequited admiration Nino, is sure-footed throughout.

Amélie seems to have largely overcome its previous faults. It’s a tad too long, something which seems to be endemic in most musicals, and there are a few too many musical intervals, but it looks beautiful and is imaginatively staged, with a plethora of tiny, quirky details to delight. And where else can you see ‘Elton John’, some people-sized, singing and dancing figs,  a suicidal goldfish, a Brazilian carnival dancing gnome and a leading lady coming and going by flying lampshade?

Runs until 24 August 2019 | Image: Contributed

This review was originally written for The Reviews Hub 

NEWS: Crowd-funder campaign to support spoof documentary FOH (Front of House) filming at King’s Theatre Edinburgh

CROWDFUNDER CAMPAIGN LAUNCHED TO MAKE NEW EPISODES OF SPOOF DOCUMENTARY ‘FOH’.

Tom Read Wilson, Harriet Thorpe, Grant Stott and Andy Gray join the cast of mockumentary series ‘FOH’, filmed at the iconic King’s Theatre Edinburgh.

FOH, the spoof documentary that charts the ups and downs of life working front of house in a theatre has started a Crowdfunder campaign to make three brand new episodes featuring a starstudded cast. Edinburgh writer and director Andrew Dyer filmed the pilot for FOH two years ago which quickly gained over 50,000 views online and developed a strong fan base.

The show was inspired by his time working front of house in London and at the King’s and Festival Theatres in Edinburgh. On how the pilot came to be:  “Working front of house is a great place for people watching as the audiences are completely different from one show to the next and there is always a brilliant mix of staff working. Over the years I started to take note of funny situations that would happen and characters that stood out and it seemed only natural that a fly on the wall comedy was the best way to share some of them!”

Dyer is an Edinburgh native, he studied acting at Queen Margaret University before training at the Royal Academy of Music in London. He turned his hand to writing and directing comedy in 2014 where he developed his first Edinburgh Fringe show with comedy partner Michelle Whitney who he met while studying at RAM. (Whitney also features in ‘FOH’ as Linda the Front of House Manager.)

The pilot proved so popular that he has decided to create more episodes, with some famous faces now joining the original cast, and is turning to crowdfunding where they need to raise £8,000 to make three short episodes. “We made our pilot on basically zero budget and pulled in a lot of favours to do so and as proud as we are of our pilot we are not able to produce more episodes in the same circumstances. We want to pay for our professional cast and crew as well as cover the various production expenses so any donations made would be greatly appreciated but even just a ‘like’ and ‘share’ to spread the word will go a long way!”

‘Celebs Go Dating’ star Tom Read Wilson is the latest to join the line up of star cameos that includes Harriet Thorpe (‘Absolutely Fabulous’, ‘The Brittas Empire’) and King’s Theatre panto stars, Andy Gray and Grant Stott. 

The King’s where ‘FOH’ is filmed (but not set) is an Edinburgh institution and has been welcoming audiences since 1906. The new episodes will be made in advance of the theatre’s major redevelopment in 2021.

You can find out more about ‘FOH’ and make a donation by visiting: https://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/foh-the-mockumentary.

The original episode can be viewed on their Facebook page: https:// http://www.facebook.com/fohthemockumentary

“If you’re a theatre fan I hope you will enjoy ‘FOH’ but I also hope that anyone who has ever worked a customer service job can relate to the people in the show or recognise similar situations they’ve experienced!”

REVIEW: The Rocky Horror Show – King’s Theatre, Glasgow

There are few other shows so beloved or so enduring as the Rocky Horror Show. It’s a summer Monday evening and the theatre is packed from floor to rafters with fans clad in their best Columbia, Magenta, Rocky, Brad, Janet and even a few Frank N. Furter costumes for the latest tour of this nearly 50-year-old show.

The audience is in full-on participation mode and the excitement before curtain up is tangible. The second the Usherette (a fabulous Laura Harrison, who also doubles up as Magenta) steps onstage, the audience is raring to go. Every infamous call back is on cue, every moment for joining in is taken – this is a crowd that knows every word and every step to every song and is here to enjoy the night to the fullest.

There are many reasons why Rocky Horror has been performed almost continuously since its creation in 1973 – the big hits come thick and fast, the dialogue is cheeky and cheesy in equal measure, it never takes itself seriously, but the talent and commitment of the cast and the quality of Richard O’Brien’s genius writing means that under the 1950s B-Movie veneer, this is a show of quality.

Boy band royalty, Blue’s Duncan James steps into Frank’s glittered platforms and satin corset and boy does he give it his all. From entrance to exit he looks like he’s living his best life and judging from the ear-splitting reception from the audience they are loving every minute along with him. James is ably supported by dance royalty Joanne Clifton, who again demonstrates how multi-talented she is, singing and acting as Janet and there’s strong support from a fine-sounding James Darch as Brad. While Rocky Horror veteran and fan-favourite Kristian Lavercombe is indisposed tonight, his understudy Andrew Ahern is a revelation as Riff Raff and Philip Franks, arguably one of the finest narrators in the world of Rocky Horror, returns.

There are few shows that pack more entertainment into two hours, and few that stand up to repeat viewing like Rocky Horror. Hands-down one of the best musicals of all time and with this first-rate cast, it would be a crime to miss it.

Runs until 17 August 2019 | Image: Contributed

This review was originally written for The Reviews Hub

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