Tag Archives: Ivo van Hove

NEWS: EASTWOOD PARK PRESENTS NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE

Eastwood Park Theatre will bring the National Theatre to Giffnock as part of their project ‘NT Live’, which broadcasts world-class theatre across the UK.

Three NT Live performances are lined up this season, featuring renowned, award-winning actors including Gillian Anderson, Sally Field and Bill Pullman.

First on the line-up will be All About Eve, starring Gillian Anderson (X Files) and Lily James (Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again), streamed live to Eastwood Park Theatre on Thursday 11 April, followed by Arthur Miller’s All My Sons on 28 May and Andrea Levy’s Small Island on 11 July.

Anthony McReavy from East Renfrewshire Culture and Leisure, said: “National Theatre Live has been experienced by over five million people around the world so we’re excited to bring this concept to our local audience, featuring some of the best productions, with top class casts and performances. We have upgraded our cinema screen and technology with a new Panasonic Laser projector, screen and surround sound system to maximise the viewing experience of the National Theatre productions.

Each broadcast is filmed in front of a live audience in London’s West End with cameras positioned around the auditorium to ensure that our audience at Eastwood Park will enjoy the best possible experience of the show.

All About Eve will broadcast live from the West End in London, lifting the lid on a world of jealousy and ambition. This new production is from one of the world’s most innovative theatre directors, Ivo van Hove and asks why our fascination with celebrity, youth and identity never gets old.

Arthur Miller’s All My Sons will be filmed live at The Old Vic in London, starring Academy Award-winner Sally Field (Steel Magnolias, Brothers and Sisters) and Bill Pullman (The Sinner, Independence Day) and comes to Eastwood Park Theatre on 28 May.

The third show, Small Island, is a new theatre adaptation of Andrea Levy’s Orange Prize-winning novel featuring a company of 40 actors who will be filmed live on stage as part of National Theatre Live’s 10th birthday, coming to Eastwood Park on 11 July.

Tickets cost £15 standard and students can attend for £12 for All About Eve and All My Sons. Tickets for Small Island are priced at £12 standard and students can attend for £10. Visit www.eastwoodparktheatre.co.uk/boxoffice or call 0141 577 4956. 

Pictured: Lily James, Gillian Anderson.

Photograph: Jan Versweyveld.

REVIEW: Hedda Gabler – Festival Theatre, Edinburgh

This stark and sleek version of Ibsen’s classic play, adapted by Patrick Marber and directed by Ivo van Hove, demonstrates Hedda Gabler has resonance far beyond its time.

An ice-cold but electrifying Hedda (Lizzy Watts) returns from her honeymoon with new (but already unwanted and undesired) husband Tesman (played by Abhin Galeya as more youthful and vibrant than those that have come before him, but still more interested in his academic buddies, and still treating his wife like a trophy in a display cabinet), to the blank walls of her marital prison. Apparently lacking the means or self-motivation to free herself, Hedda sets out on a path of universal destruction.

The production plays out at a uniform pace which makes the unfolding horror all the more insidious. Hedda is a master manipulator, taking perverse pleasure in her malevolence. Whilst hurting and harming all those around her, every act of cruelty is ultimately harming only one person, Hedda herself. Her self-annihilation is uncomfortable to watch and every action, foreshadows the inevitable ending.

Jan Versweyveld’s whitewashed representation of Hedda and Tesman’s new marital home is cell-like, and despite it’s vast size, feels claustrophobically confining. The sparseness reflecting Hedda’s own view of the physical and psychological walls between which she’s trapped. Indeed, van Hove and Marber’s adaptation shines a modern light on Hedda’s actions, actions that we would now associate as classic symptoms of depression. Versweyveld’s lighting is a triumph, almost a character in itself, subtly shifting the mood in the auditorium.

However, for all that does work, there are details that jar: video intercoms, but no mobile phones, Løvborg’s precious manuscript in handwritten form only, characters discussing riding coats and whether they should call each other by Christian names while swanning around in modern dress. While much resonates, it has been robbed of much its power to shock in transporting it to the 21st Century. While it is depressing to think that over a century on, gender imbalance still exists and many women are still trapped in stifling marriages due to financial and familial pressure, but most have, or can find, an avenue of escape or support. The nagging question keeps coming to mind: “Why in today’s world, doesn’t she just pack up and leave?”

Watts is impressive in the titular role as is Annabel Bates (below) as old schoolmate Mrs. Elvsted. While an object of Hedda’s torture both in the past and present, she has much that Hedda envies, and Bates imbues her with a steely backbone hidden behind the soft exterior. Adam Best, in an uncomfortably resonant display of sexual harassment, (in light of the Weinstein allegations) is suitably abhorrent as the bullying Brack.

Despite some questionable directorial choices, Hedda Gabler, while no longer shocking, remains unnerving, and this National Theatre production deserves to be seen by a wide audience.

Production photography Brinkhoff/Mögenberg