Tag Archives: Feature

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Backstage photo tour of Glasgow’s Theatre Royal

Here is a glimpse behind the scenes of Glasgow’s oldest and Scotland’s longest-running theatre, the Theatre Royal.

Originally opening as the Royal Colosseum & Opera House in 1867, the theatre changed its name in 1869 on receiving its royal charter (and confirmation of respectability) from Queen Victoria.

Literally hewn from the stone quarry below, it has survived multiple fires, changes of ownership and a stint as the headquarters of Scottish Television and now stands resplendent on the corner of Hope Street and Cowcaddens Road, its Victorian auditorium restored to its full glory and its 2014 extension shining like a splendid jewel. Home to Scottish Opera and Scottish Ballet the grande dame of Scottish theatre is better than it has ever been in its near-150 year life.

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The new foyer and staircase designed by Page and Park and opened during the 2014 festive season.

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INTERVIEW: Rebecca Norris, actor and co-deviser of The Wedding Reception coming to Eastwood Park Theatre’s Carmichael Hall in May.

Glasgow Theatre Blog had the chance to talk to Rebecca Norris, co-creator of The Wedding Reception coming to Eastwood Park Theatre this May.

Tell us a little bit about the play.

The Wedding Reception is a unique immersive theatrical dining experience. It invites you to be a guest at a surprise wedding reception for newlyweds William and Kate. You join the family (and a few uninvited guests) through two hours of a muddled attempt at traditional wedding celebration rites where nothing seems to go as planned. They cry, laugh and dance, and hopefully you will too! (maybe not the cry bit).

And your role…

Four actors play nine roles in The Wedding Reception. I play two roles: Lynn (the mother of the bride) and Marge (the groom’s aunt). Lynn is a great role to play She’s a wonderful and warm northern lady. A bit of a mum to everyone and will talk about anything. Nothing is off limits with Lynn. Aunt Marge is much colder. A stuck up ‘wanna-be’ who’s faked most things in her life to get her where she is today.

 

How has the play been received so far, has it been different in different locations?

The Wedding Reception has been performed all over the UK, including Scotland and Wales – although this is our first time in Glasgow. We have even been lucky enough to do tours across Australia and a show in Singapore. Depending on the location, we change a few references in the show for audiences to relate to but on the whole we’ve found wherever we are the universal truth is that everyone loves a good wedding so everyone always has a great time.

What is life like backstage on tour?

Backstage on tour can be a bit crazy, really. We have a lot of quick costume changes throughout the show so backstage can be manic. Especially when we are out and about on tour and the size of our changing area can vary quite some bit. We’ve all been very close together in some shows.

Touring can be demanding, how do you keep your performance fresh/look after yourself when you’re having to travel as well as perform on stage at night?

Keeping this show fresh isn’t so much of a challenge, as it’s very different to traditional theatre shows. The audience members are not just watching a show, they become an integral part of it so with their input we never perform never same show twice. It certainly keeps us all on our toes. Good planning and keeping it all in good fun is key to staying healthy and fighting fatigue on the road. We spend a lot of time in each other’s company so trying find ways of making long journeys and mundane jobs fun is really important.

Can we go back a bit and talk about what inspired you to become an actor and the path you took to become one?

I didn’t get into acting until quite late – I was 30 before I’d even considered it. Although I remember having a love of theatre when I was younger, I never considered it to be an option. It was only by chance that I did a workshop in Brighton which actually changed everything. Suddenly my sole focus and drive was on acting. I went to drama school and worked full-time while attending to fund myself. Once I graduated I tried to make sure each job I got would lead to another until it became my full-time job and I’ve never looked back.

Any advice for aspiring performers?

It’s never too late! If it’s something you have a passion for then go get involved. Maybe do some courses and see where it takes you.

Finally, why should people come along to see the play? And where else can we see it?

Everyone should come to see this play! – though it’s PG, because of some sexual innuendo and partial nudity. That aside, each show is truly different as audiences react in various ways to being swept up in the raucous action. Whatever happens though, one thing’s for sure – it will be an unforgettable experience.
You are all invited to the most madcap marital celebration of them all and get to eat a 3-course meal as well.

We are playing at Carmichael Hall in Eastwood Park Theatre on Saturday 12 May at 7:30pm.

We’re also visiting:

Birmingham REP (10-11 May)

Greshams in Ipswich (18 May)

Bedford Swan Hotel (also 18 May)

Hadley Park House in Telford (19 May)

AFC Portchester Club House (22 June)

Nottingham Theatre Royal (6 July)

– and Edinburgh Fringe 2-27 August.

FEATURE: From Stage to Screen – Pop Art inspired by Film Adaptations of Stage Plays.

Art & Hue treads the boards for the new collection of pop art inspired by plays adapted into films.
From the glitzy showbiz of musicals to the provocative black comedy of Joe Orton, Art & Hue has transformed images from the archives of Studiocanal into eight stylish pop art prints which celebrate iconic productions and actors.

All prints in the From Stage to Screen collection are available in three sizes and a wide choice of colour options, including a new combination of vibrant orange & purple inspired by posters from the 1968 production of The Anniversary starring Bette Davis.

The theatrical collection includes a re-imagined poster for the first all-British talking picture with sound released in 1929, BlackMail directed by Alfred Hitchcock, as well as Joe Orton’s Entertaining Mr Sloane with Beryl Reid, Peter McEnery & Harry Andrews.

Screen doyenne Bette Davis in The Anniversary gets the Art & Hue treatment as does the cult B-movie sci-fi production of Devil Girl From Mars with Patricia Laffan.

The Edinburgh-set musical Let’s Be Happy is pure Strictly-come-dancing ballroom glamour, with Tony Martin in his white tuxedo and Vera-Ellen as a high-kicking showgirl.

Completing the collection, ukulele king George Formby features in an illustrated reworking of “Turned Out Nice Again” and Barbara Windsor takes centre-stage as the prominent star of Joan Littlewood’s Theatre Workshop production of “Sparrows Can’t Sing”.

A stylish way to bring the theatre into the home, the collection features Art & Hue’s signature halftone style (halftone is an age-old technique that uses dots to make up the printed image, similar to newspapers or comic books).

Unlike traditional posters, which are printed on thin paper with inks that fade, Art & Hue creates giclée art prints, printed on 310gsm archival card, made from 100% cotton, with fine-art museum-grade pigment inks to last hundreds of years.
Available exclusively online at artandhue.com/plays  

INTERVIEW: LOCAL TALENT CHRISTOPHER JORDAN-MARSHALL MAKES WEST END DEBUT IN MAMMA MIA!

It seems like a short while ago I saw you as a student at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland starring as the Emcee in Cabaret. Tell us what happened between then and starring in the West End.

Ahhhh amazing, you got to see Cabaret! Definitely one of my favourite parts I ever got to play. So, round about that same time I also signed with a London agent and started to get auditions coming through, including auditions for Mamma Mia! in London and for the tour. I didn’t get past the first round and just kind of forgot about it. I graduated in July 2016, and almost immediately booked my first professional job in London, Floyd Collins at the Wiltons Music Hall. Once that finished, I was back in Scotland at the Tron Theatre for Christmas, in the The Snaw Queen, followed immediately after by Still Game:Live at The SSE Hydro. Luckily, I hadn’t really stopped, and so made the move back to London to start auditioning again. Cut to two months later, and a few rounds of auditions for Mamma Mia! again, and suddenly I was going to be Sky in the West End!

Georgina Castle & Christopher Jordan-Marshall as Sophie and Sky
London Cast 2017/2018

Tell us how you felt when you got the call to say you’d be making your professional West End debut.

Well it was about a week after the finals for Mamma Mia!, and I was sort of waiting to hear about a couple of things. When my agent phoned, she said ‘So, do you want some good news?’ and I’m pretty sure I swore at her down the phone and yelled a bit. I was honestly jumping about my house, totally ecstatic. Cliché as it is, this was something I had been wanting and dreaming of ever since I was little and so for that dream to become a reality at the age of 22 is just really special for me. I’m grateful every day.

How are you enjoying playing Sky?

It’s bloody brilliant! I’m honestly having such a good time. Everyone that works at the Novello, the cast, creatives and crew are an absolute joy to work with, and there is a total family vibe amongst us all. We get such amazing audiences every night, and even though it’s been running in the West End for 18 years, there is still something really fresh and new about our cast which is so exciting. When we first took over in June, we performed a slot at West End Live, which is sort of a concert weekend in Trafalgar Square where musicals all around the UK and in central London perform. That was a pretty special moment, singing and dancing an Abba megamix to thousands of people.

Christopher Jordan-Marshall as Sky (front centre)

What do you think makes Mamma Mia! so enduringly popular?

There are so many elements I think. The songs come first obviously. You get the sexiness of things like Gimme Gimme! and Voulez Vous, and then also the heart from songs like Slipping Through My Fingers and The Winner Takes It All. Then you have the story which interweaves these songs seamlessly in a way that lots of jukebox musicals are unable to do. It’s a story about mothers and daughters, about strong female friendship, and about empowerment of women. Certainly back when it was first conceived, there wouldn’t have been many stories like it, and only really now is that starting to change. It’s just such an awesomely feel good show, which makes every audience member leave with a huge grin on their face. They get to escape to a beautiful Greek island for two and half hours, what’s not to love?! People need escape like that more than ever these days, so I’m glad I can contribute to that.

What is life like backstage at the Novello?

Well I’m lucky enough to get a dressing room to myself next to the stage on the ground floor. It’s not a huge room, so I tend to keep the door wedged open and slowly over time it has sort of changed into a mini green room for the other company members to chill in when they aren’t needed on stage. I have a bit of time in between the things I’m involved in on stage so I’m happy for the chat. Usually backstage totally runs like clockwork, everyone knows exactly where they are supposed to be but every so often it becomes a bit hectic. We have two large set pieces that are moved around on stage with handles to create different scenes and environments. One Saturday one of the handles broke off and the pieces couldn’t move. We had to completely make up the rest of the show without them working or moving, which was fun!

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London Cast 2017/2018

How do you keep your performance fresh when you’re on stage eight times a week?

Good question. This is first contract I’ve had which is a year long, so I’m still finding that out to be honest. Something I try to do before going on every night is remind myself that all the events that happen during the show are happening for the first time, so I don’t pre-empt anything, and that usually makes me present. That, and just constantly being open to reacting to whatever Sophie or whoever I’m with and what they’re giving me. That makes it fun every night because you don’t know what you are going to get. And if something is a bit rubbish one night, or something goes wrong, you get to try again tomorrow and be better!

Can we go back a bit and talk about what inspired you to become an actor and the path you took to becoming one?

I don’t know if anything particularly inspired me to become an actor, I think I was always pretty sure that was what I wanted to do since I was a little guy. I was put into local amateur shows and went to youth drama groups/theatre schools. Music and drama was something I always kind of excelled in at school, so it started to become obvious what path I was going down. It was a way to express myself whilst growing up, when I didn’t particularly know how to yet. If I didn’t have those groups and shows, I think being a teenager would have been a lot harder. I guess the teachers and friends that were in my life during that time inspired me to pursue it professionally. Oh and my uncle Alan. He was the one who introduced me to a lot of theatre and has always been my biggest fan. He’s a big inspiration for all this.

Do you have any advice for kids back home who aspire to become a performer?

If you love it, pursue it. There are so many ways to become part of theatre and the arts professionally, which many kids aren’t made aware of in schools. Actors, musicians, hair and makeup, production, agents, casting, it’s all out there. Do not let your parents try and choose your pathways for you, and make you do something you don’t want to; you’ll be unhappy. I was lucky enough to be fully supported by my family in all my endeavours but sometimes that doesn’t happen. I remember my guidance teacher told me that I shouldn’t do music AND drama at the same time in school, and made it out that it was practically impossible to pursue a career in it. Needless to say, I didn’t listen to her. Even if you aren’t the best at everything to begin with, keep learning and growing and trying, because you eventually start to get somewhere. Don’t settle, and go chase your dreams; it can happen!

Christopher Jordan-Marshall (front centre) Mamma Mia! 2017/2018 Cast

Finally, why should people come along to see you in Mamma Mia!?

Our cast is amazing, there’s topless boys, and the tunes are amazing obviously. I also keep my Scottish accent so SCOTLAND REPRESENT. Come get drunk (if you’re over 18) and dance!!

You can see Christopher at the Novello Theatre – more information here

Image credit: Brinkhoff/Moegenburg

 

FEATURE: Pyro thrills at Artem Special Effects

In this third photo blog from behind the scenes at Artem, Glasgow it’s time to bring on the wind, rain and fire, as well as the big bangs.

First up some smoke and wind effects:

Next some brave souls getting shot at:

The classic glass breaking:

WALL OF FIRE!

Time for the big bangs:

For anyone who hasn’t followed the first two photo blogs on Artem the Special Effects experts you can find them here and here.

FEATURE: The Jersey Boys hit town

The UK tour of the Tony, Olivier and Grammy Award-winning Best Musical Jersey Boys comes to Glasgow at the Theatre Royal for the festive season from Tuesday 8 December 2015 – Sunday 3 January 2016.

Ahead of the multi-award-winning musical hitting town, Glasgow Theatre Blog had the opportunity to meet the cast and see a sneak peak of the show this week at Glasgow’s Oran Mor.

Matt Corner will be heading the cast as Frankie Valli* with Sam Ferriday as Bob Gaudio, Lewis Griffiths as Nick Massi and Stephen Webb as Tommy DeVito**.

Seen by over 22 million people worldwide, Jersey Boys is the true story of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons and their rise to stardom from the wrong side of the tracks. These four boys from New Jersey became one of the most successful bands in pop history, were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and sold 100 million records worldwide, all before they turned 30.  The show is packed with their hits, including Beggin’, Sherry, Walk Like A Man, December 1963 (Oh What a Night), Big Girls Don’t Cry, My Eyes Adored You, Let’s Hang On (To What We’ve Got), Bye Bye Baby, Can’t Take My Eyes Off You, Working My Way Back to You, Fallen Angel, Rag Doll and Who Loves You.

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The Jersey Boys (and girls) stride into Glasgow. Image Ian Watson

I asked Lewis Griffiths (Nick Massi), Sam Ferriday (Bob Gaudio) and Henry Davis (Tommy DeVito) what they thought was the secret to Jersey Boys continued success.

Lewis Griffiths: “It’s real, it’s gritty and it’s credible, it’s a show that appeals to people who wouldn’t normally go to the theatre, especially to musicals”.  Sam Ferriday adds: “The biggest thing, though is that although people might know the music, no one knew the back story of these guys, it’s turned out, that this is one of the reasons why the show has been such a hit, people are shocked by the actual story”. Henry Davis: “You don’t need to be a musical theatre fan to enjoy this show. People tell us that they’ve brought their husband, boyfriend, brother, dad and grandads, people who would normally never set foot in a theatre, to see the show and they’ve left more than pleasantly surprised. We’ve also been told that people have caught the theatre bug from coming to see the show. It appeals to such a wide demographic, it’s not just for one generation, it’s for everyone”. Lewis Griffiths: “Unlike big West End productions which have also toured, or are about to tour, shows like Mamma Mia, Wicked or Billy Elliot, this is a true story. It’s a legacy to these four men”.

Another secret of Jersey Boys’ success is the quality of its cast and it’s notoriously difficult casting process highlighted by producer David Ian: “It’s an unbelievably hard task to cast this show, any actor hoping to play Valli has to be under 5 foot 9 inches, look Italian-American, sing higher than Mickey Mouse and be able to act and dance as well as pulling off a believable New Jersey accent”, added to that, all actors vying for a part have to complete multiple auditions and a final vetting process by the real Frankie Valli and Bob Gaudio before stepping onstage.

Producer David Ian at the Jersey Boys Glasgow Launch. Credit Ian Watson

Producer David Ian at the Jersey Boys Glasgow Launch. Credit Ian Watson

With this is mind, and the shows reputation for quality control, I was interested to find out if each actor is able to bring anything of themselves to the roles of these flesh and blood characters.

Lewis Griffiths explains: “I’m the only one whose character is no longer with us, so for me I really had very little to go on. he was also the quiet man of the group. There are YouTube clips of the others, so there’s something there, but that was the interesting thing for me, I’ve had to develop my own way of playing Nick Massi. I’ve had to drip-feed my own life experience into my portrayal, and after a year of playing him, I now know when there’s either too much Lewis or too much Nick. It’s 50% the character and 50% the actor. Sam Ferriday adds, “yes, there are clips of Tommy DeVito, Franki Valli and Bob Gaudio as they are now, but few of them in their heyday, the era we’re playing them in, so it can be hard”.

David Ian with Jersey Boys (L-R Sam Ferriday, Matt Corner, David Ian, Henry Davis, Lewis Griffiths) - credit Ian Watson

Producer David Ian with Jersey Boys Sam Ferriday, Matt Corner, David Ian, Henry Davis, Lewis Griffiths – credit Ian Watson

Winner of Broadway’s Tony, London’s Olivier and Australia’s Helpmann Awards for Best New Musical, and a winner of 57 major awards worldwide, and with the UK and Ireland tour just passing its first birthday, I asked the actors how they sustained an enthusiasm and freshness for the show.

Sam Ferriday: “We’re fans, fans of the music and fans of this incredibly written play, and it is a play, a play with amazing music. I know I grew up with the music and Henry’s mum and dad were big fans, so he did too, so you never get bored with performing songs that you love”, he also adds “it’s also the closest you can get as an actor to feeling like a rock star every night”.

A true ensemble piece, each actor has their chance to shine. Having seen the show on several occasions the on-stage chemistry is always palpable, I ask if it’s the same off-stage. Lewis Griffiths says: “One of the secrets of its success is the fact that no one story or character dominates, it really is a story of these four guys and there has to be the right balance of personalities between the four of us and luckily there is”.

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Credit – Ian Watson

Touring from the very top to the tail of the UK, the actors have covered a vast geographic area, I wondered if there were differences in audiences’ reaction to the show up and down the country. Lewis Griffiths: “Yes, surprisingly we’ve had different reactions everywhere we go”. Henry Davis: “I’ve been here in Glasgow with Rocky Horror and that was mental so I’m looking forward to seeing the reaction to this”.

In a show filled with highlights, I ask if there are any stand-out moments each night for the actors. Lewis Griffiths: “For me it’s the dirty, gritty, fractious relationship between the four of them, the break-ups, the real life of it, the guts of the show, that’s what I get off on”. Henry Davis: “For me it’s the journey. The chance to tell this person’s story and, of course, there’s the segment where they go into the big three hits, you can feel the audience’s anticipation and when it finally comes, it’s great to see the reaction, but the end where you get to see the character’s reflect back on their story from the present day, it’s a great feeling as an actor to get to play that complete journey”. Sam Ferriday: “I agree about the end, some of the best writing is the end, when each character finishes off their narrative, it sums up the essence of the person and you get to see who that character really is”. Henry Davis: “It resonates with the audience, it’s the point where it really clicks together”. Lewis Griffith, “Despite everything, they all come back together for the finale and it shows it’s not about any one person, it’s all about the music they made together”.

With producer David Ian intimating that Jersey Boys’ world domination seems set to continue with proposed forays into China and Hong Kong, I ask the actors about the future beyond the show and if they have any roles they have their eye on. Lewis Griffiths: “I’ve spent four years chasing this role and I’ve finally got it so I don’t actually want it to end, but I’d like to stretch my wings and do some straight acting roles”. Sam Ferriday: “In terms of musical theatre, Book of Mormon, Elder Price, it’s just a different way of acting, that comic style, otherwise something gritty”. Henry Davis: “I want to do everything, try anything”. From the audience and critical reactions to these four young men and this incredible show, I’m sure this won’t be the last we hear from them.

Jersey Boys will be at Glasgow’s Theatre Royal from Tuesday 8 December 2015 – Sunday 3 January 2016.

Tickets are available here

*Michael Pickering will play the role of Frankie Valli at certain performances.

**Henry Davis will play the role of Tommy DeVito at certain performances.

FEATURE: The King’s Theatre Celebrates 110 years of Entertainment

The King’s Theatre first opened its doors to Glasgow audiences on 12 September 1904. 110 years on and the Grand Old Lady of Bath Street remains one of Scotland’s leading live entertainment venues.

The first ever production to grace the Kings’ stage was a play called The Cardinal by Lois N Parker starring distinguished actor E. S. Willard. The theatre continues to present top class drama as well as dance, comedy, children’s entertainment, music tributes and smash hit musicals direct from the West End, to this day.

In 1933 the legendary Half Past Eight shows were launched. A record run of 31 weeks under the top billing of Dave Willis remains unbroken in variety history. A comedy duo was born in the late 1950s with a unique sense of Glasgow humour and style – Rikki Fulton and Jack Milroy who became the legendary Francie and Josie.

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Scottish comedy has become synonymous with the King’s Theatre and this year also marks 50 years since the very first pantomime, A Wish for Jamie, was performed at the historic venue. Many Scottish greats have headlined the annual Christmas panto including Stanley BaxterJohnny BeattieRikki FultonJimmy LoganGerard Kelly, Elaine C. Smith and Karen Dunbar. This year Greg McHugh joins panto regulars Gavin Mitchell and Des Clarke  to dish out the traditional family fun and games in a new title for the King’s, Peter Pan.

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Many Hollywood legends have trodden the King’s boards such as Katharine Hepburn (The Millionairess, 1952), Sir Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh (The Sleeping Prince, 1953), Tyrone Power (The Devil’s Disciple, 1956) and SirMichael Caine (The Long and The Short and The Tall, 1959). In 1977 the King’s hosted The Royal Show in honour of the Queen’s Silver Jubilee where the Jackson Five performed alongside Dolly Parton.

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In recent years the King’s has presented a number of Scottish Premiers including Guys and Dolls (2006), Spamalot (2010), Dirty Dancing (2011), 9 to 5 (2012) and this year Wicked broke box office records with a sold-out 4-week run becoming the highest grossing production in the King’s history when over 53, 000 tickets were snapped up. Another first for Glasgow audiences is on the horizon – The Bodyguard The Musical is set to take the King’s by storm in March 2015.

The King’s was designed by the prolific theatre architect Frank Matcham at the height of his career. Building owners Glasgow City Council bought the theatre from original proprietors Howard & Wyndham Ltd in 1967 and in 2002 the Ambassador Theatre Group took on management of the venue. Maintaining the Grade A listed building’s Edwardian style and period features with a contemporary twist to ensure customer satisfaction and allowing the venue to house large scale productions has been a top priority. Over the last few years the restoration levy has enabled significant work in the King’s auditorium including new seating on three levels, increased number of wheelchair transfer seats, a new orchestra pit, a strengthened grid as well as  bar and toilet refurbishments.

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James Haworth, King’s Theatre General Manager said: “I feel privileged to be working at a theatre steeped in rich history and held in high regard by so many theatre lovers. Every year without fail the King’s continues to attract top class productions with star studded line ups. In a year where we’ve smashed box office records with the Scottish Premier of Wicked and will soon be celebrating the golden anniversary of our famous panto, please join us in wishing the King’s a very happy 110th birthday. I would like to thank everyone who has helped create those magic moments of theatre and thank our audiences for their continued support.”

The King’s Theatre 2014/15 Listings

26 Aug – 20 Sep                  Dirty Dancing

23 Sep – 4 Oct                     The Full Monty

7 – 11 Oct                             Whingeing Women

21 – 25 Oct                           Sunset Song

14 – 18 Oct                           GLOC: Carousel

27 Oct                                   Stones in His Pockets

28 Oct                                   Elkie Brooks

29 Oct – 1 Nov                     Lee Mack – Hit The Road Mack

3 – 15 Nov                            Blood Brothers

18 – 22 Nov                          Pantheon: Jesus Christ Superstar

24 Nov                                  Eric and Little Ern

25 Nov                                  The Circus of Horrors

26 Nov                                  Jackson Live in Concert

27 Nov                                  Mercury

28 Nov                                  Think Floyd

29 Nov                                   Musichoir

6 Dec – 11 Jan                      Peter Pan

16 Jan                                    Vampire’s Rock

26 – 28 Jan                            Cirque Beserk

29 Jan                                    One Night of Elvis

30 Jan                                    Rat Pack Vegas Spectacular

31 Jan                                    Sing-a-long-a Frozen

3 – 7 Feb                               PMOS: Hairspray

9 – 14 Feb                             Return to the Forbidden Planet

16 – 28 Feb                           The Sound of Music

4 – 14 Mar                             The Bodyguard

22 Mar                                   Al Murray, One Man, One Guvnor

31 Mar – 4 Apr                      Barnum

7 – 11 Apr                             Dance ‘til Dawn

29 Apr – 17 May                   Shrek The Musical

18 May                                  Paul Merton Impro Chums

20 & 21 May                         Octonauts

23 May                                  Magic – A Kind of Queen

1 – 6 Jun                               Spamalot

16 – 20 Jun                           Calamity Jane

Box Office 0844 871 7648 (bkg fee)

www.atgtickets.com/glasgow (bkg fee)

 

FEATURE: Three Phantoms in Kilts

Once again I find myself typing something I never thought I would – so here for your delectation are three of the most famous Phantoms of the Opera sporting our national dress. Above is Earl Carpenter and below Ramin Karimloo and John Owen Jones. It just makes me wonder what it is about actors from Phantom and their eagerness to don a skirt.