Tag Archives: Eastwood Park Theatre

WHAT’S ON JANUARY: The Memory of Water coming to Eastwood Park Theatre this month.

Giffnock Theatre Players upcoming production The Memory of Water is coming to Eastwood Park Theatre in January 2020.

The Memory of Water is a comedy that explores the memories of three sisters on the eve of their mother’s funeral. They bicker and reveal the conflicts of the past and its grip on the present. The patterns and strains of family relationships and the distortions of their memories are only too clear – especially when their dearly departed mother ‘appears’!

A ghost story? Not really.

A tragedy? Of sorts.

A comedy? Absolutely! – laughter is as much a guest at this funeral as grief.

The Memory of Water won the Olivier Award for Best Comedy in 2000.

“A deeply felt, richly funny study of the pervasive powers of the past.” – Michael Billington, The Guardian

“The play offers a superb mix of wild humour and bruising emotion.” – Daily Telegraph

The Memory of Water runs at Eastwood Park Theatre, Rouken Glen Road, Giffnock, G46 6UG in Glasgow’s Southside from 22nd to 25th January 2020 at 7.30pm, with a matinee performance at 2.30pm on Saturday 25th January.

Tickets are £15 (£13 concessions available) and may be purchased by phoning 07518 201 756 or 0141 577 4956, or by emailing tickets-gtp@hotmail.co.uk or online at www.eastwoodparktheatre.co.uk/boxoffice (online booking fee applies).

Also available at the theatre’s box office.

For further information and for all the latest news from Giffnock Theatre Players, please visit the website at www.giffnocktheatreplayers.com or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/giffnockplayers, or on Twitter at twitter.com/giffnockplayers .

For over 70 years Giffnock Theatre Players has been a major player in amateur dramatic circles. Comedian Rikki Fulton was an early member and appeared in our very first production. For most of that time the club has presented 3 productions each season, and for 45 of those years, have staged them in Eastwood Park Theatre. The range of productions is staggering – comedies, whodunits, period dramas – and past productions include The Diary of Anne Frank, The Matchmaker, Dial M for Murder, Calendar Girls, The Steamie, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Blithe Spirit, All My Sons and One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.

REVIEW: Cinderella – Eastwood Park Theatre, Giffnock

Glasgow Academy of Musical Theatre Arts (GAMTA) have teamed up with Eastwood Park Theatre to present this year’s festive pantomime, Cinderella.

The set and costumes are a feast for the eyes, the glittering, decorated proscenium adds to the wonder before the curtain even rises. There’s glitz, glamour and special effects, all adding to the magic of the production.

While the youthful cast win in the energy and effort department, it is however, a dance-heavy, slow to get going, take on the traditional tale. There are some baffling additions to the story which seem to have been shoe-horned in to showcase GAMTA’s dance credentials, unfortunately they only add to an already over-long run time. It also suffers from the fact Buttons is being played by a young child and the object of his affections a clearly mature teen, it all adds a creepily uncomfortable element which will no doubt go over the heads of the children in the audience, but feels a tad uncomfortable for the adults.

Where it succeeds is in its comedy elements, Ciara Flynn and Rebecca McComb are a perfectly matched comedic double act as Ugly Sisters and provide the majority of the true highlights of the show.

The cast can’t be faulted for their skill or talent, however, they suffer from an over-long and overly-dull script that dilutes the magical potential the show could have had.

WHAT’S ON DECEMBER: Sleeping Beauty at Eastwood Park

Runway Theatre Company present Sleeping Beauty

Monday 02 – Saturday 07 December
7.30pm each evening
Sat matinees, 11am & 3pm

Don’t get caught napping this Christmas when Runway’s dreamy panto Sleeping Beauty comes to town.

When Princess Beauty pricks her finger on an enchanted spinning wheel she’s cursed to fall asleep for 100 years, unless she’s kissed by her one true love. Enter a dashing Prince, along with Nurse Teeny Tiddlewinks and Yo-Yo the Jester, who embark on a brave adventure to save the Princess from her terrible fate. But with the wicked Fairy Carabosse determined to ruin their plans, will our trusty trio be triumphant or is the Princess doomed to a century of snoozing?

Prices

  • £14 – £17

www.runwaytheatre.co.uk

Tickets also available from 07801 048527

WHAT’S ON OCTOBER: Giffnock Theatre Players present The Matchmaker

Giffnock Theatre Players upcoming production The Matchmaker is coming to Eastwood Park Theatre in just a few weeks.

The Matchmaker is a farce that sees a rich widower, Vandergelder, wanting to re-marry for convenience. His niece wants to marry for true love, but Vandergelder won’t allow it. Vandergelder’s assistant is looking for excitement rather than romance. Along comes The Matchmaker, Dolly, to sort it all out… but whilst pretending to help Vandergelder find a bride, she plans to marry him herself!

In 1964, songs were added to this classic comedy and it was re-named “Hello Dolly!” – “The Matchmaker” has the same plot, characters and laughs as it’s musical counterpart, but now you can see the original Dolly working her magic!

“Loud, slap dash and uproarious … extraordinarily original and funny.” – The New York Times

“One of the sweetest and smartest romantic farces ever written.” – The Wall Street Journal

The Matchmaker runs at Eastwood Park Theatre, Rouken Glen Road, Giffnock, G46 6UG in Glasgow’s Southside from 16th to 19th October 2019 at 7.30pm, with a matinee performance at 2.30pm on Saturday 19th.

Tickets are £15 (£13 concessions available) and may be purchased by phoning 07518 201 756 or 0141 577 4956, or by emailing tickets-gtp@hotmail.co.uk or online at www.eastwoodparktheatre.co.uk/boxoffice (online booking fee applies). Also available at the theatre’s box office.

For further information and for all the latest news from Giffnock Theatre Players, please visit their website at www.giffnocktheatreplayers.com. You can also find them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/giffnockplayers, or on Twitter at twitter.com/giffnockplayers .

REVIEW: Eaten – Eastwood Park Theatre, Giffnock

Lionel McLion has been roaming the plains of the Serengeti and is having a rest after having eaten his dinner, but all is not as usual. Lionel gets a bit of a fright when Mamoru, the human he’s just eaten, starts talking back.

The highly acclaimed, children’s theatre piece Eaten, starts not only a conversation between the eater and the eaten, but a wider discussion about our relationship to food (including Lionel’s impossible dream of becoming a vegetarian), where it comes from, and what happens after we’ve chomped it down.

For the kiddie audience there are many moments that engage: there are poos, farts and vomit involved and some audience participation where the tiny folk get to be a giraffe, a monkey, a cow or a frog – what’s not to love for the 6+ target audience.

It slips into the surreal often and is hysterically funny in parts: there’s a Q and A session when the tiny audience are confronted by Dr. Poo (from Pooniversity) imploring them to ask a question to their faeces – it’s hard to keep a straight face at their reactions and an off-the-wall dance section to Engelbert Humperdinck’s Last Waltz. 

The ideas are sound, but the script at times smacks of someone who doesn’t know how to pitch to small children – when the question is asked of a puppet cow Are you real or just a concept? you know that this isn’t someone who spends time with a lot of  6-year-olds.

Mamoru Iriguchi plays both predator and prey simultaneously, both he and co-performer Suzi Cunningham are engaging. It must be said though that Iriguchi needs to hone his child interaction and wrangling skills to make this a truly successful endeavour. That said, Eaten raises not only some important questions but many smiles too.

A worthy watch.

 

 

REVIEW: The Music Man – Eastwood Park Theatre, Giffnock

Runway Theatre Company again prove their worthy position at the top of the tree of amateur companies in Glasgow, reviving Meredith Willson’s Tony and Grammy Award-winning, little-seen, musical theatre classic, The Music Man, with aplomb. A timely choice too, with the announcement that in 2020, Hugh Jackman will lead the first Broadway revival in nearly two decades.

It’s 1912 and the people of sleepy River City, Iowa really don’t know what’s in store for them when smooth talking swindler Harold Hill rolls into town. However, Hill’s plans to con the innocent townsfolk are foiled when his heart finally starts to rule his head.

Old-fashioned in the nicest possible way, this is a light-hearted, undemanding tale with a bunch of quirky characters and two of musical theatre’s most enduring tunes: the oom-pah-pah-ing 76 Trombones and the much-loved classic ballad, Till There Was You.

Its old-fashionedness is both its strength and its weakness. The public’s appetite for nostalgia is sated with the homely, feel-good storyline, the period costumes and score. However, the hokey dialogue has aged badly and the heightened characterisations required by the script, render it too caricatured at times. That said, any criticisms of this production are entirely at the hands of the source material not the actors or musicians.

This is a show with a rousing chorus, the ensemble fill the auditorium with the biggest, most glorious sound you will have the pleasure to hear, and the quartet comprising Tom Russell, Ross Nicol, Cameron Leask and Bob McDevitt are just heavenly sounding. Brendan Lynch (Harold Hill), once again proves to be an adept leading man and a true triple threat, and Catherine Mackenzie (Marian Paroo) is a beautifully toned soprano. The costumes are of an excellent quality. The set and lighting are functional and easy on the eye and the transitions, especially in a theatre with no fly tower, are smooth and pacy. The child actors, of which there are many, are drilled to perfection as are the dancers – it’s unusual in an amateur production to have such universal quality.

A warm and comforting and very welcome blast from the past that will leave audience members of all ages thoroughly entertained.

Runs until Saturday 18 May 2019

 

WHAT’S ON JANUARY: Dial M For Murder at Eastwood Park.

Giffnock Theatre Players upcoming production Dial M For Murder is coming to Eastwood Park Theatre later this month. It’s an intense, sophisticated, gripping thriller made famous by the movie of the same name, directed by Alfred Hitchcock and starring Ray Milland and Grace Kelly.

M for Money… Marriage… Murder. This suspenseful classic weaves an ever-tightening web of danger and deception.

Former tennis pro Tony Wendice has carefully plotted the murder of his wealthy, elegant, younger but unfaithful wife Sheila, so that he will inherit her money. His ingenious plan involves blackmailing an old university friend to strangle her, while he has the perfect alibi. It’s the perfect murder – or so he thinks. His plan goes wrong, but as events unfold he quickly improvises, coming up with a new scheme to outsmart the police and still get rid of his wife. But has he met his match in the shrewd, sharp detective assigned to the case? Or will he get away with it all?

Dial M For Murder runs at Eastwood Park Theatre, Rouken Glen Road, Giffnock, G46 6UG in Glasgow’s Southside from 23rd to 26th January 2019 at 7.30pm, with a matinee performance at 2.30pm on Saturday 26th January.

Tickets are £15 (£13 concessions available) and may be purchased by phoning 07518 201 756 or 0141 577 4956, or by emailing tickets-gtp@hotmail.co.uk or online at www.eastwoodparktheatre.co.uk/boxoffice (online booking fee applies). Also available at the theatre’s box office.

For further information and for all the latest news from Giffnock Theatre Players, please visit our website at www.giffnocktheatreplayers.com. You can also find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/giffnockplayers, or on Twitter at twitter.com/giffnockplayers .

INTERVIEW: Kirsty Eila McIntyre on new show The Arrival

Kirsty Eila McIntyre most recently performed with Tortoise in a Nutshell/Jim Harbourne in their award nominated production of The Myth of the Singular Moment, and in Italy with Charioteer Theatre in their productioon of A Bench on The Road. Her film/TV/Video credits include: It’s Complicated, Benchmark 6 (Short Version), Sacred Birth, Carol of The Bells. Theatre credits include: Glory On Earth and Beauty and the Beast (Royal Lyceum, Edinburgh), InElsWhEre (Martyn Dempsey/TamFest), Scribble (Andy Edwards/Amy McKenzie), The Bruce in Ireland, Miss Julie, and Something Resembling Love (Black Dingo), I Promise I Shall Not Play Billiards (Tightlaced Theatre), Words, Words, Words (Traverse Theatre), The Elephant Man and Frankenstein (Canny Creatures).

Kirsty talks to Glasgow Theatre Blog about her latest role in The Arrival.

Tell us a little bit about the play.

The Arrival is based on the graphic novel by Shaun Tan and tells the story of a man who has to leave his family to seek work in a new land.  It’s about his experiences of adapting to a new place, and how everything can seem strange and intimidating at first.

And your role…?

I have several roles including the daughter, musician, and I’m one of the puppeteers of Diggy.

The play uses different types of languages can you tell us more about that?  

The play mainly tells the story using visual language, but there are some sections that use both English and BSL. We’ve been very conscious not to give one language precedence over the other or that one is translating for the other, they both are totally equal.

Can we go back a bit and talk about what inspired you to become an actor and the path you took to become one?

I’ve loved the theatre and storytelling since I was a child and was always creating wee puppet shows and performances. I have really vivid memories of being taken to promenade shows in gardens when I was young, and to the theatre, and it always seemed really magical, and a lot of fun. I then did some Summer Schools with SYT before doing an HNC in Acting at Telford. Then I worked as a professional actor for a couple of years before going to East 15 Acting School for 3 years.

Any advice for aspiring performers?

Take any opportunity to learn. Watch lots of theatre, film, TV, listen to audio dramas, anything that’s accessible to you, find out what you like and why. Have hobbies and take an interest in the world around you. I was lucky enough to have viola lessons at school, and then piano, then I bought a flute a few years ago and have used these instruments in several shows, as well as being taught new ones (I play the melodica in The Arrival). I’m always keen to learn a new skill, you never know what can give you inspiration and come in useful.

Finally, why should people come along to see the play? and where else can we see it?

The play is visually very beautiful with lots of interesting props and characters. Its themes are universal as we’ve all experienced being new somewhere, whether it’s a new country, city, school or workplace. We’ll be touring around Scotland, starting in Glasgow then heading to Dundee, Inverness, Carlops and Livingston.

Kirsty is performing in Solar Bear Theatre Company’s The Arrival, coming to Eastwood Park Theatre this Friday 28 September at 7.30pm. Book tickets: https://www.eastwoodparktheatre.co.uk/article/9661/The-Arrival

 

 

REVIEW: Opera Highlights (Scottish Opera) – Eastwood Park Theatre, Giffnock

Four singers, one piano, seventeen venues, Scottish Opera’s much-anticipated Opera Highlights returns (yippee!) and as always, it never fails to delight.

Director Daisy Evans has framed this year’s production as an electronically created playlist of opera gems. An “on-stage opera newbie” goes on an “emotional musical voyage” discovering, via Spotify and Google via Alexa, just how music has the power to move. Evans is a director to watch, and her staging undoubtedly adds greatly to the enjoyment of the evening. It’s funny, clever, accessible, inclusive, all the things that good theatre of any genre should be. It also looks great. A neon door and window and a few wooden crates serve as the only stage dressing, but coupled with the brightly coloured suited, booted and co-ordinating nail-varnished cast, it works brilliantly.

Freed from the constraints of remaining in a single character, the singers’ personalities are given the chance to shine in a variety of roles, and the warmth just radiates from the quartet. The acoustics in this small auditorium are as close to ideal as it is possible to get in a theatre and the voices give goose bumps. Soprano Sofia Troncoso, Mezzo Sarah Champion, Tenor Richard Pinkstone, Baritone Dawid Kimberg are exceptional as is pianist Jonathon Swinard.

The programme, designed by Scottish Opera’s Head of Music Derek Clark, delivers something for everyone. The range of composers, styles and moods, genuinely runs the gamut of human emotion.

Scottish Opera’s annual ‘Highlights’ tour, and indeed the whole of the company’s programming, is a model for how a national company should operate. A hands-down, five star, exemplary evening of entertainment.

Currently on tour to: Ayr, Drumnadrochit, Wick, Forres, Ullapool, Stornoway, Portree, Lanark, Helensburgh, Dundee, Inverurie, Laurencekirk, Perth, Dumfries, Musselburgh and St. Andrews.

More information at Scottish Opera

 

 

 

 

INTERVIEW: Scottish actor Martin Docherty currently touring Scotland with acclaimed play McLuckie’s Line.

Scottish actor Martin Docherty, who is currently touring Scotland with McLuckie’s Line chatted with Glasgow Theatre Blog about this hugely acclaimed show, coming to Glen Halls in Neilston on Tuesday 25 September and Eastwood Park Theatre on Wednesday 26 September.

Tickets are £9, available from: https://www.eastwoodparktheatre.co.uk/article/9670/McLuckies-Line.

Tell us a little bit about the play.

The play is a funny, sad , raw hard hitting monolougue about Lawrence McLuckie , an out of work actor and compulsive gambler who is waiting in a hospital corridor for his first session of Chemo after being diagnosed with cancer. He is also waiting on a call from his agent about the biggest part he will have ever had. He can’t stand the silence so he begins to talk.

And your role…

McLuckie’s Line is an old fashioned working class tale where I play 32 characters!

McLuckie is a nice guy who has been dealt a bad hand. He’s a great actor but like most actors he struggles to get work. He has always seen life as a bit of a gamble but the stakes are really high. He ponders his life as he faces his mortality.

How has the play been received so far, has it been different in different locations?

The play is very Glaswegian and goes down a storm in Glasgow and the surrounding area but it is also going down well in Inverness, Dundee and Stirling. People no matter where can relate to Mcluckie or other characters in the play.

What is life like backstage on tour?

Life backstage on this show is different from any other I’ve done mainly because I’m on my own. It can get a bit lonely. I have to ensure the lights, sound queues etc are spot on and ensure before I leave the house that I have everything as there is no stage manager. I feel I’m learning all the time though I could do with a chum now and again.

Touring can be demanding, how do you keep your performance fresh/look after yourself when you’re having to travel as well as perform on stage at night?

The travelling and performing is something I’m used to as an actor.  It can be tough and a little stressful relying on Scotrail. I tend to get to the venue around 2.30pm, run the technical stuff then try and relax. Then ensure I have a good meal and get home asap to get enough sleep. It’s tricky trying to peak at 7.30pm but like I say I’ve been acting for 21 years so my body is used to it, I guess.

Can we go back a bit and talk about what inspired you to become an actor and the path you took to become one?

I started acting when I was 10 years old thanks to my sister who was in an amateur company. My first part was the Artful Dodger in Oliver. I auditioned for the RSAMD when I was 20, was accepted and I loved it. It truly is my dream job and I couldn’t see myself doing anything else.

Any advice for aspiring performers?

Advice for actors…..I would say only do it if it really is your dream. Be prepared to take rejection and have periods without work and constantly work at your craft.  When not working spend at least an hour doing something, your voice, your physicality, sight read the newspaper. You must always be trying to improve.

Finally, why should people come along to see the play? and where else can we see it?

People should come and see McLuckie’s Line as it deals with many issues that can affect us all . You’ll laugh, you may cry. It’s just me, three chairs and some props . There is no fancy set or costumes . It’s theatre stripped back to pure storytelling. Most importantly I think you’ll have a good night out at the Theatre. There is something for everyone I’m McLuckie’s Line. Writer Martin (Traverse) and I are very proud of it.

Glen Halls in Neilston on Tuesday 25 September and Eastwood Park Theatre on Wednesday 26 September.

Tickets are £9, available from: https://www.eastwoodparktheatre.co.uk/article/9670/McLuckies-Line.

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