Tag Archives: Eastwood Park Theatre

REVIEW: The Music Man – Eastwood Park Theatre, Giffnock

Runway Theatre Company again prove their worthy position at the top of the tree of amateur companies in Glasgow, reviving Meredith Willson’s Tony and Grammy Award-winning, little-seen, musical theatre classic, The Music Man, with aplomb. A timely choice too, with the announcement that in 2020, Hugh Jackman will lead the first Broadway revival in nearly two decades.

It’s 1912 and the people of sleepy River City, Iowa really don’t know what’s in store for them when smooth talking swindler Harold Hill rolls into town. However, Hill’s plans to con the innocent townsfolk are foiled when his heart finally starts to rule his head.

Old-fashioned in the nicest possible way, this is a light-hearted, undemanding tale with a bunch of quirky characters and two of musical theatre’s most enduring tunes: the oom-pah-pah-ing 76 Trombones and the much-loved classic ballad, Till There Was You.

Its old-fashionedness is both its strength and its weakness. The public’s appetite for nostalgia is sated with the homely, feel-good storyline, the period costumes and score. However, the hokey dialogue has aged badly and the heightened characterisations required by the script, render it too caricatured at times. That said, any criticisms of this production are entirely at the hands of the source material not the actors or musicians.

This is a show with a rousing chorus, the ensemble fill the auditorium with the biggest, most glorious sound you will have the pleasure to hear, and the quartet comprising Tom Russell, Ross Nicol, Cameron Leask and Bob McDevitt are just heavenly sounding. Brendan Lynch (Harold Hill), once again proves to be an adept leading man and a true triple threat, and Catherine Mackenzie (Marian Paroo) is a beautifully toned soprano. The costumes are of an excellent quality. The set and lighting are functional and easy on the eye and the transitions, especially in a theatre with no fly tower, are smooth and pacy. The child actors, of which there are many, are drilled to perfection as are the dancers – it’s unusual in an amateur production to have such universal quality.

A warm and comforting and very welcome blast from the past that will leave audience members of all ages thoroughly entertained.

Runs until Saturday 18 May 2019

 

NEWS: Following the success of Rapture Bites Lunchtime Theatre, Michael Emans will direct Patrick Marber’s Olivier Award nominated play The Red Lion starring Brookside’s John McArdle.

Following the success of Rapture Bites Lunchtime Theatre, Michael Emans will direct Patrick Marber’s Olivier Award nominated play The Red Lion starring Brookside’s John McArdle.

It will tour to 16 venues in Scotland ending with a week’s run at the Theatre Royal, Glasgow.

The Red Lion FC is an English non-league side that has dreams of the big time.

However, the club’s manager, Kidd, will stop at nothing to realise his own ambitions of achieving money and fame. So, when young Jordan, who ‘plays like a God’, joins the club, Kidd sees his golden opportunity.

One man stands in his way – the kit-man, Yates – club legend and footballing ‘hero’– has other ideas. A ‘Clash of the Titans’ ensues between Yates and Kidd over the future of Jordan and the football club.

Award-winning writer Patrick Marber’s hit play unfolds like a Greek Tragedy, transcending ‘the beautiful game’, in a tale of heroism, hubris and handballs!

The Red Lion offers a funny, profound and unmissable night at the theatre. Starring Emmerdale and Brookside star John McArdle, Brendan Charleson (Coronation Street) and rising young star Harry MacMullen.

Patrick Marber commented: I am thrilled Rapture Theatre are giving ’The Red Lion’ its Scottish premiere and very excited to see this terrific cast performing in a country that loves football with a passion.”

Director Michael Emans said: Having been a huge fan of Patrick Marber since I was at drama school, it is a fulfilment of a long held ambition to direct one of his plays. Patrick, in his writing combines humour, pathos and a sensitivity to the human experience that is deeply moving. When I first read The Red Lion in 2017, I knew that I had to direct it: the way Patrick used the milieu of the local football club as a microcosm of the wider world, to explore the themes of collective ethic versus individual ambition and the way the play articulated the need and desire to both be heroic and to have heroes in your life, I found to be totally compelling.

We seem to live in world of villains both political and otherwise so a play that focuses on heroes, tragic heroism and the hubris of the individual feels prescient. Like all the best tragedies it also very very funny!  I hope that audiences, like me, can fall in love with this wonderful play!”

Alongside the production Rapture will be running a series of post-show discussion panels. Rapture is working in partnership with Show Racism the Red Card (SRTRC) to help raise awareness of issues such as racism, sexism and bullying, which can still occur within the game of football.

These post-show events will offer a great opportunity to engage with community groups and audiences and promote the significant work Show Racism The Red Card undertake, as well as discussing the themes raised within the play. Rapture want to provide an insight into the philosophy, passion and behind the scenes workings of a football club.

The panels will consist of Director Michael Emans, members of the cast and invited guests from local football clubs and SRTRC.

TOUR DATES

Palace Theatre Kilmarnock Preview 8 May & 9 May 7.30pm

Brunton Theatre, Musselburgh 11 May 7.30pm

Howden Park, Livingston16 May 7.30pm

Tolbooth, Stirling18 May 8pm

Motherwell Theatre 20 May 7.30pm

Beacon Arts Centre, Greenock 23 May 7.30pm

Lanark Memorial Hall 24 May 7.30pm

Harbour Arts, Irvine 25 May 7.30pm

Eastwood Park, Giffnock 26 May 7.30pm

Village Theatre, East Kilbride, 28 May 7.30pm

Ryan Centre, Stranraer, 31 May 7.30pm

Theatre Royal Dumfries, 1 June 7.30pm

Byre Theatre, St Andrews 7 & 8 June 7.30pm

Falkirk Theatre 13 June 7.30pm

Adam Smith Theatre, Kirkcaldy 15 June 7.30pm

Theatre Royal, Glasgow 18 – 22 June 7.30pm ( matinee 22 June at 2.30pm)

NB: There will be a post show discussion lasting 30 minutes at each venue

WHAT’S ON APRIL: Blackeyed Theatre bring Sherlock Holmes & The Sign of Four to Eastwood Park

Wednesday 24 & Thursday 25 April, 7.30pm at Eastwood Park Theatre

Adapted for the Stage by Nick Lane
Music composed by Tristan Parkes
Produced in association with New Theatre Royal Portsmouth and South Hill Park Arts Centre

“When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth”

Crammed full of adventure, romance, comedy and of course one or two rather brilliant deductions, The Sign of Four is Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s epic second Sherlock Holmes tale, a breath-taking yarn brought to life in this spectacular new stage adaptation.

Don’t miss Blackeyed Theatre’s stunning world premiere of Sherlock Holmes: The Sign of Four. Original live music, stylish theatricality and magical story-telling combine for an unforgettable theatrical experience. The game’s afoot!

Recommended for age 11+

Price

  • Standard £16.50
  • Concession £15.50

Bring a group of 10 people and one person can go free.

AMATEUR FOCUS: Harlequin Youth Theatre present Little Shop of Horrors

Harlequin Youth Theatre present Little Shop of Horrors at Eastwood Park Theatre

Wednesday 13 – Saturday 16 March
7.30pm each evening
Sat matinee, 2.30pm

Little Shop of Horrors is a horror comedy rock musical about a hapless florist shop worker who raises a plant that feeds on human blood and flesh. The musical is based on the low-budget 1960 black comedy film of the same name. The music is in the style of early 1960s rock and roll, doo-wop and early Motown, and includes several well-known tunes, including the title song, “Skid Row”, “Somewhere That’s Green”, and “Suddenly, Seymour”.

Yet another lively show by the Harlequin Seniors – not too many of whom we hope will be eaten during the run!!

Prices

  • £16

www.harlequinyouth.co.uk

Tickets also available from Harlequin on 07593 093028 or email tickets@harlequinyouth.co.uk

Book Now

WHAT’S ON JANUARY: Dial M For Murder at Eastwood Park.

Giffnock Theatre Players upcoming production Dial M For Murder is coming to Eastwood Park Theatre later this month. It’s an intense, sophisticated, gripping thriller made famous by the movie of the same name, directed by Alfred Hitchcock and starring Ray Milland and Grace Kelly.

M for Money… Marriage… Murder. This suspenseful classic weaves an ever-tightening web of danger and deception.

Former tennis pro Tony Wendice has carefully plotted the murder of his wealthy, elegant, younger but unfaithful wife Sheila, so that he will inherit her money. His ingenious plan involves blackmailing an old university friend to strangle her, while he has the perfect alibi. It’s the perfect murder – or so he thinks. His plan goes wrong, but as events unfold he quickly improvises, coming up with a new scheme to outsmart the police and still get rid of his wife. But has he met his match in the shrewd, sharp detective assigned to the case? Or will he get away with it all?

Dial M For Murder runs at Eastwood Park Theatre, Rouken Glen Road, Giffnock, G46 6UG in Glasgow’s Southside from 23rd to 26th January 2019 at 7.30pm, with a matinee performance at 2.30pm on Saturday 26th January.

Tickets are £15 (£13 concessions available) and may be purchased by phoning 07518 201 756 or 0141 577 4956, or by emailing tickets-gtp@hotmail.co.uk or online at www.eastwoodparktheatre.co.uk/boxoffice (online booking fee applies). Also available at the theatre’s box office.

For further information and for all the latest news from Giffnock Theatre Players, please visit our website at www.giffnocktheatreplayers.com. You can also find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/giffnockplayers, or on Twitter at twitter.com/giffnockplayers .

INTERVIEW: Kirsty Eila McIntyre on new show The Arrival

Kirsty Eila McIntyre most recently performed with Tortoise in a Nutshell/Jim Harbourne in their award nominated production of The Myth of the Singular Moment, and in Italy with Charioteer Theatre in their productioon of A Bench on The Road. Her film/TV/Video credits include: It’s Complicated, Benchmark 6 (Short Version), Sacred Birth, Carol of The Bells. Theatre credits include: Glory On Earth and Beauty and the Beast (Royal Lyceum, Edinburgh), InElsWhEre (Martyn Dempsey/TamFest), Scribble (Andy Edwards/Amy McKenzie), The Bruce in Ireland, Miss Julie, and Something Resembling Love (Black Dingo), I Promise I Shall Not Play Billiards (Tightlaced Theatre), Words, Words, Words (Traverse Theatre), The Elephant Man and Frankenstein (Canny Creatures).

Kirsty talks to Glasgow Theatre Blog about her latest role in The Arrival.

Tell us a little bit about the play.

The Arrival is based on the graphic novel by Shaun Tan and tells the story of a man who has to leave his family to seek work in a new land.  It’s about his experiences of adapting to a new place, and how everything can seem strange and intimidating at first.

And your role…?

I have several roles including the daughter, musician, and I’m one of the puppeteers of Diggy.

The play uses different types of languages can you tell us more about that?  

The play mainly tells the story using visual language, but there are some sections that use both English and BSL. We’ve been very conscious not to give one language precedence over the other or that one is translating for the other, they both are totally equal.

Can we go back a bit and talk about what inspired you to become an actor and the path you took to become one?

I’ve loved the theatre and storytelling since I was a child and was always creating wee puppet shows and performances. I have really vivid memories of being taken to promenade shows in gardens when I was young, and to the theatre, and it always seemed really magical, and a lot of fun. I then did some Summer Schools with SYT before doing an HNC in Acting at Telford. Then I worked as a professional actor for a couple of years before going to East 15 Acting School for 3 years.

Any advice for aspiring performers?

Take any opportunity to learn. Watch lots of theatre, film, TV, listen to audio dramas, anything that’s accessible to you, find out what you like and why. Have hobbies and take an interest in the world around you. I was lucky enough to have viola lessons at school, and then piano, then I bought a flute a few years ago and have used these instruments in several shows, as well as being taught new ones (I play the melodica in The Arrival). I’m always keen to learn a new skill, you never know what can give you inspiration and come in useful.

Finally, why should people come along to see the play? and where else can we see it?

The play is visually very beautiful with lots of interesting props and characters. Its themes are universal as we’ve all experienced being new somewhere, whether it’s a new country, city, school or workplace. We’ll be touring around Scotland, starting in Glasgow then heading to Dundee, Inverness, Carlops and Livingston.

Kirsty is performing in Solar Bear Theatre Company’s The Arrival, coming to Eastwood Park Theatre this Friday 28 September at 7.30pm. Book tickets: https://www.eastwoodparktheatre.co.uk/article/9661/The-Arrival

 

 

REVIEW: Opera Highlights (Scottish Opera) – Eastwood Park Theatre, Giffnock

Four singers, one piano, seventeen venues, Scottish Opera’s much-anticipated Opera Highlights returns (yippee!) and as always, it never fails to delight.

Director Daisy Evans has framed this year’s production as an electronically created playlist of opera gems. An “on-stage opera newbie” goes on an “emotional musical voyage” discovering, via Spotify and Google via Alexa, just how music has the power to move. Evans is a director to watch, and her staging undoubtedly adds greatly to the enjoyment of the evening. It’s funny, clever, accessible, inclusive, all the things that good theatre of any genre should be. It also looks great. A neon door and window and a few wooden crates serve as the only stage dressing, but coupled with the brightly coloured suited, booted and co-ordinating nail-varnished cast, it works brilliantly.

Freed from the constraints of remaining in a single character, the singers’ personalities are given the chance to shine in a variety of roles, and the warmth just radiates from the quartet. The acoustics in this small auditorium are as close to ideal as it is possible to get in a theatre and the voices give goose bumps. Soprano Sofia Troncoso, Mezzo Sarah Champion, Tenor Richard Pinkstone, Baritone Dawid Kimberg are exceptional as is pianist Jonathon Swinard.

The programme, designed by Scottish Opera’s Head of Music Derek Clark, delivers something for everyone. The range of composers, styles and moods, genuinely runs the gamut of human emotion.

Scottish Opera’s annual ‘Highlights’ tour, and indeed the whole of the company’s programming, is a model for how a national company should operate. A hands-down, five star, exemplary evening of entertainment.

Currently on tour to: Ayr, Drumnadrochit, Wick, Forres, Ullapool, Stornoway, Portree, Lanark, Helensburgh, Dundee, Inverurie, Laurencekirk, Perth, Dumfries, Musselburgh and St. Andrews.

More information at Scottish Opera

 

 

 

 

INTERVIEW: Scottish actor Martin Docherty currently touring Scotland with acclaimed play McLuckie’s Line.

Scottish actor Martin Docherty, who is currently touring Scotland with McLuckie’s Line chatted with Glasgow Theatre Blog about this hugely acclaimed show, coming to Glen Halls in Neilston on Tuesday 25 September and Eastwood Park Theatre on Wednesday 26 September.

Tickets are £9, available from: https://www.eastwoodparktheatre.co.uk/article/9670/McLuckies-Line.

Tell us a little bit about the play.

The play is a funny, sad , raw hard hitting monolougue about Lawrence McLuckie , an out of work actor and compulsive gambler who is waiting in a hospital corridor for his first session of Chemo after being diagnosed with cancer. He is also waiting on a call from his agent about the biggest part he will have ever had. He can’t stand the silence so he begins to talk.

And your role…

McLuckie’s Line is an old fashioned working class tale where I play 32 characters!

McLuckie is a nice guy who has been dealt a bad hand. He’s a great actor but like most actors he struggles to get work. He has always seen life as a bit of a gamble but the stakes are really high. He ponders his life as he faces his mortality.

How has the play been received so far, has it been different in different locations?

The play is very Glaswegian and goes down a storm in Glasgow and the surrounding area but it is also going down well in Inverness, Dundee and Stirling. People no matter where can relate to Mcluckie or other characters in the play.

What is life like backstage on tour?

Life backstage on this show is different from any other I’ve done mainly because I’m on my own. It can get a bit lonely. I have to ensure the lights, sound queues etc are spot on and ensure before I leave the house that I have everything as there is no stage manager. I feel I’m learning all the time though I could do with a chum now and again.

Touring can be demanding, how do you keep your performance fresh/look after yourself when you’re having to travel as well as perform on stage at night?

The travelling and performing is something I’m used to as an actor.  It can be tough and a little stressful relying on Scotrail. I tend to get to the venue around 2.30pm, run the technical stuff then try and relax. Then ensure I have a good meal and get home asap to get enough sleep. It’s tricky trying to peak at 7.30pm but like I say I’ve been acting for 21 years so my body is used to it, I guess.

Can we go back a bit and talk about what inspired you to become an actor and the path you took to become one?

I started acting when I was 10 years old thanks to my sister who was in an amateur company. My first part was the Artful Dodger in Oliver. I auditioned for the RSAMD when I was 20, was accepted and I loved it. It truly is my dream job and I couldn’t see myself doing anything else.

Any advice for aspiring performers?

Advice for actors…..I would say only do it if it really is your dream. Be prepared to take rejection and have periods without work and constantly work at your craft.  When not working spend at least an hour doing something, your voice, your physicality, sight read the newspaper. You must always be trying to improve.

Finally, why should people come along to see the play? and where else can we see it?

People should come and see McLuckie’s Line as it deals with many issues that can affect us all . You’ll laugh, you may cry. It’s just me, three chairs and some props . There is no fancy set or costumes . It’s theatre stripped back to pure storytelling. Most importantly I think you’ll have a good night out at the Theatre. There is something for everyone I’m McLuckie’s Line. Writer Martin (Traverse) and I are very proud of it.

Glen Halls in Neilston on Tuesday 25 September and Eastwood Park Theatre on Wednesday 26 September.

Tickets are £9, available from: https://www.eastwoodparktheatre.co.uk/article/9670/McLuckies-Line.

INTERVIEW: Richard Shelton on Sinatra And Me, coming to Eastwood Park

Following his ‘Best Actor in a Leading Role’ West End nominated performance as Frank Sinatra in RAT PACK and his 5-star, sell-out run at the Edinburgh Festival for 2 years running, Richard Shelton returns to the UK with his hit LA show that looks behind the iconic blue eyes of Frank Sinatra whilst still serving up his timeless hits. Richard kindly spared us some time in his busy schedule to chat about his hit show.

What we can expect from the show? 

It’s a show about hope – about how short life is and how important it is to try for your dreams, whatever they may be. I was 50 when I plucked up the courage to go pack my knapsack of dreams and move to Los Angeles. The show looks at what inspired me and how it links my life with Frank Sinatra and the incredible synchronicity that links our lives. I was nominated ‘Best Actor in a Leading Role’ for portraying Frank Sinatra in the hard hitting drama ‘Rat Pack Confidential’ in London’s West End and my interest in him comes from an actors perspective – what make him tick, how his mercurial personality made him the herculean icon he was. And of course the wonderful music. During the show, I go deep behind Sinatra’s blue eyes and evoke what is might have been like to spend an hour with him. I also explain how Sinatra’s tuxedo literally walked into my life – https://vimeo.com/155748882 and how I was one of the last people inside his last home before it was demolished by fluke.

It spills into a new drama I’m bringing to this year’s Edinburgh Festival, ‘Sinatra: RAW’ which imagines Frank Sinatra at his last intimate gig in Palm Springs before his retirement. The air is electric and people jostle for position. He drinks ‘One For My Baby’ too many and starts to reminisce. But things take an unexpected turn. This is the 2am Sinatra you dream of meeting: Dangerous. Unpredictable. Startling. Brilliant. He addresses his accusers on subjects ranging from his alleged Mafia connections, his womanising, to his famed hatred of the press. And in-between, he sings in that smoky midnight voice on subjects from lost love to getting even! Songs include ‘One For My Baby’, ‘My Way’, ‘I’m a Fool to Want You’, ‘I’ve Got You Under My Skin’ and a haunting acapella version of ‘My Foolish Heart’ which he sang to Ava Gardner from his hotel balcony at night in her bungalow below – true story!

What songs get the biggest reaction? 

‘Angel Eyes’ – I evoke Sinatra’s classic performance when he took on the persona of a drunk – it’s quite heart-breaking and very moving. And ‘That’s Life’ – it’s an anthem of being knocked back and picking yourself up again. Everyone can identify with it.

What’s coming up next year? Where else are you touring?

Right after the festival I have a show with the 72-piece Doha Philharmonic Orchestra in Qatar. In Spring 2019, I’m going on a 2 months tour to South Africa and New Zealand.

Why do you think Sinatra’s music still has such an enduring appeal?

Frank Sinatra was arguably the worlds best story teller through a song. When he sang of sadness he’d take you right there into the wee small hours with him. Or when he sang about ‘Flying to the Moon’ you soared up there too. He had an intuitive understanding of the lyrics which for him, came first, and through the words, he told a story. He also sang with attitude – you got the impression he couldn’t give a damn if you liked him or not which made him all the more appealing. And having one of the most beautiful voices ever known also helps.

How long has it taken for you to perfect your portrayal of Frank Sinatra?

About 17 years. I’m still learning.

Tell us what we can expect from the show?

Story telling, music and little known facts about Sinatra. I also perform songs from my  new album ‘Lost and Found’ which was recorded at Capitol Studios in LA alongside Sinatra’s band mates and in his studio using his microphone. The album comprises original big band arrangements including ‘An Englishman in Love in LA’ and ‘Sinatra and Me’ and jazz inspired arrangements of pop classics including, ‘It’s Not Unusual’ and ‘Oh, What a Night (Dec ’63)’’ which I perform as a haunting ballad. Sounds crazy, but it really works!

Do you find audiences differ as you travel around the country?

Audiences do differ but the one thing they have in common is a love of Sinatra and the music of that era. It’s timeless.

You can catch Richard at the Fringe in SINATRA:RAW details here: https://tickets.edfringe.com/whats-on/sinatra-raw

and at Eastwood Park in Sinatra and Me details/tickets here: https://www.eastwoodparktheatre.co.uk/article/9588/Sinatra-and-Me

 

REVIEW: The Wedding Reception – Carmichael Hall, Eastwood Park, Giffnock

Interactive Theatre International already have a well-established hit on their hands with their much-loved Faulty Towers Dining Experience. Created in 2015, The Wedding Reception offers the same mad-cap, interactive, who-knows-what’s coming next, evening of adventure.

Will and Kate have got married, and while the groom is under the illusion that their wedding reception is a quiet, intimate affair, his bride and his in-laws have other plans…

Every aspect of The Wedding Reception is startlingly familiar, the seating plan, the circular linen covered tables, the gilded chairs, sparkling silver cutlery, top table resplendent with a multi-tiered cake, a three course meal and over a hundred guests decked out in their finery. There’s also the jack-the-lad best man, an eye-poppingly clad mother of the bride, the snobby aunt, the uninvited mother of the groom and a somewhat out of his depth wedding planner.

A cast of just four gamely portray the motley cast of characters with great gusto. Ben Hood is a particular star as best man Ricky and bride’s dad Ray, his physical comedy garners the biggest laughs of the night and is the catalyst to the audience relaxing and enjoying the craziness. Dave Tremain’s expressions as put-upon bridegroom Will are a masterclass in comic acting: sometimes subtlety is key. There’s mild audience (guest) harassment but nothing that would make anyone uncomfortable and the mixture of madcap comedy and time to enjoy your food is well worked out.

The cast have to be lauded for not only keeping the action going throughout the two-hour plus running time, but also dealing with the unpredictable and unscripted responses of the ‘guests’.

This is an original take on a night at the theatre and delivers an exciting entertainment experience for those looking for something different. Great fun and highly recommended.

 

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