Tag Archives: Andy Arnold

NEWS: TRON ANNOUNCE LA PERFORMANCE – A BRITISH COUNCIL-FUNDED COLLAB WITH INTERNATIONAL VISUAL THEATRE, PARIS

Following Tron Theatre’s extremely encouraging Spring-Summer 2022 season, they have announced the first Tron Theatre Company production of the Autumn season – an extraordinary piece of devised visual theatre entitled La Performance.

In a British Council-funded international collaboration, Andy Arnold will create and direct this new work inspired by the poetic realism of classic French cinema, with theatre-maker and actor Ramesh Meyyappan, celebrated deaf performer and director of the International Visual Theatre, Emmanuelle Laborit, alongside composer and performer Ross Whyte.

Two actors, Her and Him rehearse backstage for a performance. When the curtain goes up, a clown and the woman the clown adores, perform the rehearsed routines. But things go wrong. They argue. Who is it arguing though? Her and Him or their characters?

Says Andy of the show: ‘IVT- International Visual Theatre, Paris first came onto my radar after working with Tron Associate, Ramesh Meyyappan on his show Off Kilter and to now be able to devise a piece of entirely visual work with him and Emmanuelle has been a very exciting experience. Taking our inspiration from classic French cinema of the 1940s, with its emotional intensity and combination of comedy and tragedy, we hope that La Performance will draw audiences deeply into the story of a complicated and doomed relationship. Expressive, extraordinarily beautiful and painfully real at the same time, it will be our homage to that French cinematic genre as well as a rare insight backstage, both before and after a theatre performance, where the atmosphere is heavy with nervous tension.’

Incorporating innovative sound and lighting design, La Performance will be wholly without dialogue, making it accessible to both hearing and non-hearing audiences. Examining the opposition between life and art, and the depth of human emotion, expressed in visual storytelling, it will be a unique, cross-cultural collaboration.

La Performance will open at the Tron Theatre, Glasgow on the 12th October and run until the 22nd October.  It will then transfer to the International Visual Theatre in Paris, where it will run from 8th – 20th November.

Tickets for the Tron Theatre run of La Performance are available to book online at tron.co.uk, by telephone on 0141 552 4267, text phone 18001 0141 552 4267 or in person at the Box Office.

Image: Vincent Quenot

REVIEW: The Tempest – Tron Theatre, Glasgow

This review was originaly written for and published by The Public Reviews at:

http://www.thepublicreviews.com/the-tempest-tron-theatre-glasgow/

Writer: William Shakespeare

Director: Andy Arnold

Design: Hazel Blue

Lighting Design: Sergey Jakovsky

Sound Design: Barry McCall

Tron Artistic Director Andy Arnold directs a predominantly female cast from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland’s MA Classical and Contemporary Text programme, in this his Mayfesto production of The Tempest: Shakespeare’s tale of magic, morality, love and betrayal.

While the programme notes state ‘the text has been slightly edited’, it manages to stick largely to Shakespeare’s original whilst giving greater focus to the themes of colonisation which exist in the text: indeed in this production the play’s first and last words are given over to Martinican poet, politician and denouncer of colonial racism, Aimé Césaire. These judicious cuts result in a lively and engaging production which whips along at a cracking pace.

The production scores highly on atmosphere: Hazel Blue’s inventive staging, an earthy hued island with a skeleton of a high-masted sailing ship, provides enough interest for the eye without detracting from the action and is complemented well by Sergey Jakovsky’s effective lighting design. However it must be said that Barry McCall’s sound design whilst evocative, often drowns out whole patches of dialogue, whether this is down to poor enunciation on the part of the actors or a heavy-hand on the volume button one cannot tell.

Arnold’s nimble direction showcases the skill of his actors and keeps the interest levels high throughout; indeed he manages to elicit some beautifully measured performances and a United Nations of accents from this youthful cast. Standout among them Rebecca Murphy as Prospero, who delivers a perfectly controlled central performance, though her extremely strident Australian accent sometimes consigns some of Prospero’s most notable lines to the winds. Kenny Boyle’s Ariel is a less sulky characterisation than the usual and his mastery of the ethereal other-worldliness of the sprightly spirit is captivating. The two are ably supported by the rest of the company, most noteworthy among them Flora Sowerby’s Cockney wide-boy Stephano and Amy Drummond’s Welsh Valley Trinculo, who provide the high comedy of the piece. There is also a more thoughtful and dignified portrayal  of the native, enslaved Caliban from Renee Williams.

This is a refreshing departure from the more traditional stagings of the play and the perfect showcase for these young actors at the start of their careers. A vibrant re-telling of the tale, visually pleasing, bristling with life and with some new food for thought thrown in. Well worth catching if you can.

Runs until 16th May 2014