Tag Archives: Andy Arnold

WHAT’S ON DECEMBER: Ali the Magic Elf at the Tron

This Christmas, Tron Theatre Company is presenting a brand-new Tron festive classic, Ali the Magic Elf.

Ideal for little ones aged 3-6 years and their adults, the show is conceived and directed by Tron Theatre’s Artistic Director Andy Arnold (who has recently returned from directing The Selfish Giant for Beijing Children’s Theatre Company) for the studio space. Designer Jenny Booth is set to transform our Changing House into a cosy North Pole workshop where Ali the Magic Elf (played by Ramesh Meyyappan) is busy working away in Santa’s workshop.

It’s Christmas eve but everything is going wrong and the elves are panicking- none of the children’s letters have been answered! What is an elf to do! Suddenly with the jingle of bells and the swoosh of a sleigh- magic is in the air! But Ali and his friends (played by Simon Donaldson & Pride & Prejudice* *sort of’s Christina Gordon) may need a bit of help! 

Featuring costume design by Vicki Brown and with a live score played by actor/musicians Simon and Christina, Ali the Magic Elf uses the wonderful physicality and comic timing of three professional actors to great effect and is an unforgettable visual experience for little ones who might still be too young for the Tron’s main house panto.

Ali the Magic Elf is 50 minutes of charming storytelling which incorporates Meyyappan’s playful magic tricks, engaging basic BSL audience interaction and live music throughout in a perfect Christmas treat for little ones.

ALI THE MAGIC ELF

FRI 29 NOVEMBER – TUE 31 DECEMBER 2019  

REVIEW: The Tempest – Tron Theatre, Glasgow

This review was originaly written for and published by The Public Reviews at:

http://www.thepublicreviews.com/the-tempest-tron-theatre-glasgow/

Writer: William Shakespeare

Director: Andy Arnold

Design: Hazel Blue

Lighting Design: Sergey Jakovsky

Sound Design: Barry McCall

Tron Artistic Director Andy Arnold directs a predominantly female cast from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland’s MA Classical and Contemporary Text programme, in this his Mayfesto production of The Tempest: Shakespeare’s tale of magic, morality, love and betrayal.

While the programme notes state ‘the text has been slightly edited’, it manages to stick largely to Shakespeare’s original whilst giving greater focus to the themes of colonisation which exist in the text: indeed in this production the play’s first and last words are given over to Martinican poet, politician and denouncer of colonial racism, Aimé Césaire. These judicious cuts result in a lively and engaging production which whips along at a cracking pace.

The production scores highly on atmosphere: Hazel Blue’s inventive staging, an earthy hued island with a skeleton of a high-masted sailing ship, provides enough interest for the eye without detracting from the action and is complemented well by Sergey Jakovsky’s effective lighting design. However it must be said that Barry McCall’s sound design whilst evocative, often drowns out whole patches of dialogue, whether this is down to poor enunciation on the part of the actors or a heavy-hand on the volume button one cannot tell.

Arnold’s nimble direction showcases the skill of his actors and keeps the interest levels high throughout; indeed he manages to elicit some beautifully measured performances and a United Nations of accents from this youthful cast. Standout among them Rebecca Murphy as Prospero, who delivers a perfectly controlled central performance, though her extremely strident Australian accent sometimes consigns some of Prospero’s most notable lines to the winds. Kenny Boyle’s Ariel is a less sulky characterisation than the usual and his mastery of the ethereal other-worldliness of the sprightly spirit is captivating. The two are ably supported by the rest of the company, most noteworthy among them Flora Sowerby’s Cockney wide-boy Stephano and Amy Drummond’s Welsh Valley Trinculo, who provide the high comedy of the piece. There is also a more thoughtful and dignified portrayal  of the native, enslaved Caliban from Renee Williams.

This is a refreshing departure from the more traditional stagings of the play and the perfect showcase for these young actors at the start of their careers. A vibrant re-telling of the tale, visually pleasing, bristling with life and with some new food for thought thrown in. Well worth catching if you can.

Runs until 16th May 2014