Tag Archives: 2020

NEWS: Take Me Somewhere 2020: festival line up announcement

In a world that is simultaneously crushing us and crumbling around us, a breadth of voices fight back via astonishing live art, dance and performance at this year’s Take Me Somewhere festival, which takes place in venues across Glasgow in May. Whilst some artists go loud and rebel, others slow down and contemplate…

Performances include:

  • a live and loud sonic destruction of an artist’s 1,000 piece CD collection in response to the failure and bitter glamour of the creative industries;
  • a stunt ballet for the internet age, featuring naked dancers on suspended motorbikes;
  • two intimate, meditative performances featuring dogs;
  • a deconstructed dance production inspired by the Video Vixens – provocative female models who appeared in 90s hip-hop videos;
  • an immersive pop concert spectacular examining stardom, self care and redemption;
  • the return of the beloved Buzzcut festival, which takes over the final weekend with pay-what-you-can performances and parties.

TMS Artistic Director LJ Findlay-Walsh said: “There has been a particular political urgency to this last year, a vortex of disorientation and empty promises. This year’s festival acts in response, where artists find themselves laying bare their discontent, smashing things up, excavating their identities and exploring paths of resistance. Where some artists become louder and embrace the messiness of our situation with chaos and an unbridled sense of joy and playfulness, some retreat inwards to find stillness and truth, exploring kinship and comfort. Ultimately, ‘kinship’ feels like the central theme this year and perhaps every year as audiences come together in solidarity with artists to explore and to make sense of this world around us.’’

Take Me Somewhere is Glasgow’s festival of contemporary performance. No longer the new kid on the block, Take Me Somewhere 2020 unfurls across the city from our main theatre stages to our libraries – a fearless, international festival comprised of the most innovative and vital performance artists from here and across the globe; a festival that reflects who and where we are today. Originally created to build on the legacy of The Arches following its closure in 2015, the festival has since become an essential go-to hub on the international live art and contemporary performance circuit.

FESTIVAL LISTINGS:

JULIE CLEVES & ROBBIE SYNGE

TO EARTH

CCA, GLASGOW

Thu 14 May (4.00-5.30pm)

Sat 16 May (4.30-6.00pm)

Sun 17 May (2.00-3.30pm)

 

To Earth is about physical acts of cooperation and a close companionship. With simple ambitions, Robbie and Julie devise novel solutions to share otherwise inaccessible time and space together. Their actions are quiet and personal, bold and adventurous. Performing their history through movement, talking, film and DIY, this is a space to move and be still, reflect and exchange. In a world of difference, where lies the potential of doing and achieving more together? Where are we blending in and standing out?

FK ALEXANDER with ANDY BROWN:

THE PROBLEM WITH MUSIC
World Premiere

VENUE TBA, GLASGOW

Thu 14 May 2020

6-10pm

 

A new durational work from FK Alexander in collaboration with musician Andy Brown (Divorce/Stable/Ubre Blanca/Remember Remember) in which a 25+ year 1,000 piece CD collection is destroyed, soundtracked by distorted remixing of sonics, exploring the failure and bitter glamour of the creative industries.

 

 

LUCY & MOLLY SUGGATE:

MOLLY & LUCY: THE COMPANION SERIES:

Is it Too Hard to Be (A) Human?

[Performance Lecture]

TRAMWAY, GLASGOW

Fri 15 May 2020

5.30pm (1hr)

 

Molly & Lucy are creating a performance-lecture that seeks to find connections between the sprawling mass of information, theory, instinct & obscurity.

 

LUCY & MOLLY SUGGATE:

MOLLY & LUCY: THE COMPANION SERIES:

The Moody Blues (Greyhound & Dancer)

[Live installation]

TRAMWAY, GLASGOW

Sat 16 May 2020

3pm-5pm (Durational, come & go)

 

A soft, padded space, a giant dog bed, a space for reclining, listening and embodying stillness. This installation will be a meditation on companion species, kinships, parenthoods; on tired hopeless bodies, on exhaustion… extinction. The public are invited to join, witness Molly & Lucy in their daily practice of being and reclining together. Molly is an ex racing greyhound aged 6; originally from Ireland, Lucy is a dance artist aged 42; originally from Yorkshire. Both bodies have endured extreme physical pressure, sometimes out of choice, nature, addiction and or survival.

 

 

ABSOLUTELY, AWESOME, AFFIRMATIVE

Created by NIC GREEN

World Premiere

TRAMWAY [T1], GLASGOW

Fri 15 & Sat 16 May 2020

7:30pm

 

Absolutely, Awesome, Affirmative is a radical new project from Nic Green, exploring how we believe – in fact, in nature, in truth, and in ourselves – and how that belief can be targeted, twisted, and shaped into whatever we want it to be. Part TED talk, part shopping channel special, part showbiz hypnotism, the stage becomes a post-truth world of opulent theatricality, visual flair, and driving soundscapes.

 

 

DANA MICHEL (Canada):

CUTLASS SPRING      

TRAMWAY [T4], GLASGOW

Fri 15 May 2020

9.30pm

 

Inching towards uncensorship, engaging the infinite potential of everyday objects, CUTLASS SPRING is, at once, a manifesto and a heated reflection, an ethnography of sexual understanding and an archaeology of desire.

DANA MICHEL (Canada):

MERCURIAL GEORGE
TRAMWAY [T4], GLASGOW

Sat 16 May 2020

5.30pm (75 mins)

 

In the wake of the acclaimed Yellow Towel, Mercurial George traces and transforms the banal, provoking a certain malaise. Sifting through the heaps of dusty clues leftover in the wake of initializing a cultural excavation, Dana Michel offers a destabilizing solo. The body vacillates as it struggles for balance and a toehold. Stretching out time with minimalist and deconstructed movement, Michel becomes the archeologist of her own persona.

 

 

LUCY McCORMICK (UK):

Life: LIVE!
VENUE TBA, GLASGOW

Sat 16 May 2020

Doors 9.30pm

Show 10.00pm

 

Life: LIVE! is a subversive, immersive, pop concert spectacular imagined by nu-pop sensation Lucy McCormick, and her electrotrash Girl Squad. Featuring shonky-spectacular, stadium-chic live visuals created with artist Morven Mulgrew, and an album of original music, Life: LIVE! straddles stardom, self care and redemption in a hilarious, crumbling, musical extravaganza.

 

 

MARK BLEAKLEY:

HOW WE HANDLE THINGS
CCA, GLASGOW directions

Wed 20 May 2020

5-7pm (50 minute cycle repeated)

 

A performance installation incorporating dance, sculpture and conversations. How we handle Things. asks us how relationships between people and objects are manifest, endure and disappear. Audiences are welcome to enter the work at any point and may be invited to take part in the casting process.

 

 

 

CHERISH MENZO (Netherlands):

JEZEBEL
CCA, GLASGOW

Wed 20 May 2020

7pm (60 mins)

JEZEBEL is a dance production inspired by the Video Vixens: provocative female models who appeared in hip-hop videos on MTV in the late ’90s. The Vixens danced in revealing costumes to male-dominated music. But the influence they exercised could be great: often, the Vixens determined the aesthetic of these videos and so the popularity of the artist. They were hyper-sensual and lived by the Ride or Die stereotype, but at the same time were strong and independent.

 

 

SARAH HOPFINGER:

PAIN AND I
PLATFORM, GLASGOW

Fri 22 May 2020

19:00 – 19:50

Pain and I is a bold and playful choreographic meditation on living with chronic pain. Through experimental movement and text, Pain and I acknowledges the hardships and celebrates the richness and complexities of chronic pain experience.

 

 

NICOLA GUNN (Australia):

WORKING WITH CHILDREN
PLATFORM, GLASGOW

Fri 22 May 2020

20:15 (1 hour)

Five children are asked to learn choreography live in front of an audience in an attempt to teach a radical kind of joyful vulnerability.

 

 

SOOJIN CHANG:

WILD BREATHING  

TRAMWAY [T4], GLASGOW

Sat 23 May 2020

4pm & 5pm (45mins)

Soojin Chang (b.1991) presents an encounter and invitation into a world inhabited only by womxn and dog, combining audience interaction and sculptural elements over two 45-minute durations. Here, Chang presents the seed of a multispecies surrogacy dream, formed and un-formed as a sort of repetitive food-reward experiment – enacted by a continuously altered set of performers, composed of the artist, a female dog, and members of the audience. A small waxen grotto serves as an isolated capsule in which the interactions are carried out, though the ephemeral boundaries will be simultaneously transplanted on the exhibition walls in the form of a live feed.

 

 

KEIJAUN THOMAS (USA):

MY LAST AMERICAN DOLLAR:
ROUND 1. Tricking and Flipping Coins: Making Dollars Hit;

ROUND 2. Black Angels in the Infield: Dripping Faggot Sweat;

ROUND 3. Whatchu Gonna Do: Marvelous like Marva

TRAMWAY [T1], GLASGOW

Sat 23 May 2020

7.30pm

In this immersive solo work, Keijaun Thomas investigates and embodies resistance, asking: “How do we resist temptation, how do we slow down, how do we play, how do we survive?” Thomas traverses a multimedia installation, combining structural fragments of environments associated with labour, ritual, and hospitality such as locker rooms, strip clubs, waiting rooms, church pews, and field days. Investigating forms through which black and brown people hold space for each other, Thomas asks, how to carry the multiplicities of being young, gifted and black, powerfully engaging with the entangled histories of labour, subjugation and resistance.

 

 

CLARICIA PARINUSSA:

SENDIRI
TRAMWAY, GLASGOW

Sat 23 May 2020

9.30pm

Premiere performance of sendiri, a Tramway Supports commission for artist Claricia Parinussa with musician / vocalist Alloysious Massaquoi (Young Fathers) and visual designer Sequoia Barnes. Drawn from physical inquiries under research project the sky was pink; with sound and writings on existence, resonance, labour, and healing. On the conversations we can only have through our bodies.

 

 

TAKE ME TO SUNDAY SCHOOL

TRAMWAY, HIDDEN GARDENS

Sun 24 May 2020

2-4pm / Free

 

Part-social and part-salon, Take Me To Sunday School is a relaxed opportunity to think and talk critically about performance.

 

 

PETER McMASTER:

A SEA OF TROUBLES  

TRAMWAY [T4], GLASGOW

Tue 26 & Wed 27 May 2020

7.30pm

Somewhere between clairvoyance and theatre criticism, A Sea of Troubles tensely exorcises the relationship between dominant theatrical tradition, masculinity, the burdens of language and the potential of the performing body. Slow and silent, paranoid and muddled, a solo performer traces the ghosts of the performance space pulling us into a world that slips out of now-ness into strangely beautiful somewhere else-ness.

 

 

SCOTTEE (UK):

CLASS
TRON THEATRE, GLASGOW

Wed 27 & Thu 28 May 2020

7.45pm

 

In his final solo show, Scottee uncovers what it is to be embarrassed about where you’re from and how you can pretend to be posher than you are, and explores why we all get a thrill playing god with green tokens from Waitrose. Class isn’t a show for those processing issues around domestic violence, food addiction and the effects of growing up in poverty. This is a show for the middle classes.

 

 

BUZZCUT

TRAMWAY, GLASGOW and surrounding area

Fri 29 – Sat 30 May 2020

All day

 

After 3 years, //BUZZCUT// is coming back atcha this May with a 2 day festival of experimental performance and live art, taking over Tramway and Glasgow’s Southside for the final weekend of Take Me Somewhere. //BUZZCUT// is a performance festival for the strangers of the world. Programmed by open application and being pay what you can to attend, the festival gives artists at all levels of experience an opportunity to show raw and untested performance works in a chilled and welcoming environment.

FLORENTINA HOLZINGER (Austria/Belgium):

TANZ
TRAMWAY [T1], GLASGOW

Sat 30 May 2020

7.30pm

 

TANZ is the third part of the trilogy: Recovery, Apollon, TANZ. The trilogy deals with notions of practice through training of different physical disciplines on stage. TANZ takes early 19th century romantic ballet as a starting point. It uses the frame of a ballet class guided by Beatrice Schoenherr, the first ballerina who danced the Sacre de Printemps naked (John Neumeier, 1972). In an operatic set up, brutal parodies of established images found in ballet, comedy and pornography are made in order to be watched from afar and up close.

 

RHIANNON ARMSTRONG

POEMS MADE FROM WORDS FOUND IN THE BIN

Libraries across Paisley & Glasgow

Dates & Times TBA

 

Rhiannon will be in residence across Paisley and Glasgow’s libraries, inviting members of the public to work with her to write poetry around shreds of paper found in the bins of the city. The resulting Poems Made from Words Found in the Bin are animated and added to a growing collection, which will be on show at various locations in Paisley and Glasgow throughout the festival.

 

Bonjour Queer Party
BONJOUR BAR, Glasgow
Sat 30 May
10pm-late

Details TBA

NEWS: Glasgow International announces further details of 2020 programme

Glasgow International has announced details of its ninth edition, the second of Director Richard Parry. Comprising 54 exhibitions and 82 events, performances and talks at over 50 spaces across the city and showcasing work by 160 artists; the theme of the 2020 festival is Attention: asking us to consider how, where and in whom our attention is placed at a time of seemingly constant distraction. Scotland’s biennial festival of contemporary art further highlights Glasgow as one of the world’s most important and exciting centres for visual art.

Further details of the 2020 programme include:

  • The first UK showing of Georgina Starr’s large-scale installation Moment Memory Monument (2017), including performances at points throughout the festival
  • A new film by Alberta Whittle, co-commissioned with Glasgow Sculpture Studios as part of a joint Canal Programme for 2020 in celebration of Scotland’s Year of Coasts and Waters 2020
  • The first presentation in Scotland of Gretchen Bender’s landmark work Total Recall (1987), which predicted the ‘image saturation’ of coming decades
  • Additional information on new works by Martine Syms, Duncan Campbell and Jenkin van Zyl
  • A ‘festival within a festival’ at SWG3, co-commissioned with the David Roberts Art Foundation (DRAF), will see performances from international artists including Paul Maheke, Lina Lapelytė and Nina Beier
  • Public performances and film screenings by artists and collectives including Love Unlimited, Urara Tsuchiya and Hamja Ahsan
  • Diverse new locations used as venues, including the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, a car garage, a primary school and a city-centre hotel room
  • Renowned art historian and professor TJ Clark to give a public lecture in the lead up to the festival (5 March) on the theme of attention and attentiveness
    Highlights from the Director’s Programme include:

In Kelvin Hall, the American artist Gretchen Bender’s Total Recall (1987) will be presented to Scottish audiences for the first time. Installed in a black box space, the eleven-channel video installation, which predicted the ‘image saturation’ of coming decades, utilises 24 monitors and three projection screens.

In addition to a major new film commission at Tramway, Quarantaine, Georgina Starr presents her large-scale sculptural performance installation Moment Memory Monument (2017) in SWG3’s Galvanizers Yard space. The ambitious work, previously unseen in the UK, explores the inherently speculative truth of memory and biography. Revisiting a scenario from Alain Resnais’ surrealist sci-fi film Je t’aime, je t’aime (1968), the work offers visitors a chance to return to a lost memory.

Yuko Mohri’s new commission for GI2020 will now be housed in the distinctive copper-roofed Pyramid building, a former church in Anderston. The Tokyo-based artist’s installation involves microphones and a Yamaha piano and uses the building’s original features, including the church organ and original chairs, to create a new sculptural and sound work which echoes the work of the pioneering composer John Cage.

The Brazilian sculptor and installation artist Ana Mazzei will create a large-scale, site-specific installation in Kelvin Hall, her first commission for a UK public institution. Occupying several rooms in Kelvin Hall, Mazzei will build a fluid narrative sequence in which sculptural objects form a physical mood or mental state – such as love or revenge – which is distinct to each room.

Also in Kelvin Hall, Duncan Campbell presents an epic new work, cinematic in scale, which marks the culmination of several years of research and planning by the artist and combines film, audio and sculpture. A giant electromagnetic mechanical display, akin to a message board at a railway station or airport, creates highly pixelated moving images alongside a recorded audio monologue. Inspired by the artist’s interest in the novels of Samuel Beckett, the work interrogates the relationship between memory and what appears on the screen.

At Tramway, Martine Syms presents S1:E4, a new episode in Syms’ project SHE MAD (2015-ongoing), in which the artist incorporates elements of the sitcom format and past TV series to explore ‘the sign of blackness in the public imagination’. A giant widescreen projection in Tramway’s largest gallery follows the central character of Martine, an aspiring artist, as she experiences a flashback to the summer of 2000, and her experience of an empowerment programme for teenage girls founded by supermodel and business mogul Tyra Banks.

 

An immersive sculptural installation by Jenkin van Zyl in Tramway’s T4 Theatre invites viewers into a scenario invoking claustrophobia, sexual ecstasy, hysteria and ‘folk horror’. At the heart of the work is In Vitro, a new film in which characters enact looped rituals of reproduction and self-pollination in an effort to achieve community, individuation and re-enchantment.

On the upstairs balcony of the Kelvingrove Museum, Glasgow-based artist France-Lise McGurn presents a sculptural installation that responds to the painting Reading Aloud (1884) by Albert Moore, which hangs in the museum’s stairwell.

A new film commission at Langside Halls by the Scottish artist Sarah Forrest uses the concept of the detective novel as a starting point to ask questions around seeing, mis-seeing and the rational mind.

Other solo exhibitions in the Director’s Programme include a display of Bodys Isek Kingelez’s ‘extreme maquettes’ at Tramway; new 2D and sculptural works by Nep Sidhu at the Gallery of Modern Art; and a retrospective of painting and drawings by Carol Rhodes at Kelvingrove.

A new film by Alberta Whittle, co-commissioned by Glasgow International and Glasgow Sculpture Studios for a new, jointly produced Canal Programme, which aims to spotlight histories and cultural activity in the area around the Forth and Clyde Canal. The film explores questions of migration and waterways and involves the local Joyous Community Choir, run predominantly for female refugees and asylum seekers in Glasgow. The Canal Programme is supported by EventScotland in celebration of Scotland’s Year of Coasts and Waters 2020.

Highlights from the Across the City programme include:

The Across the City programme celebrates the diversity, depth and vibrancy of Glasgow’s cultural life. It encompasses exhibitions, film screenings, dynamic public performances and community learning.

Solo exhibitions include: new work by photographer, media artist and researcher Ingrid Pollard at Glasgow Women’s Library, developed in response to its Lesbian Archive and Information Centre, the largest of its kind in the UK.

Inspired by Glasgow’s public wash houses (historically known as ‘Steamies’), the group exhibition You’re never done includes works by Adelita Husni-Bey alongside a group of Glasgow-based artists. The show will transform the disused Springburn Public Library and Museum, addressing gendered divisions of labour and visibility within working class communities.

Glasgow-based curatorial co-operative Chapter Thirteen presents a group exhibition, Who’s Counting?, that champions empathy, love and healing as visceral approaches to political discourse. The exhibition will feature a new film and photographic work by Margaret Salmon that reflects on feminist economic theory, alongside new work exploring the notion of ‘repair’ by Kader Attia, who is showing in Scotland for the first time. Attia will also take part in a talk and film screening over the festival opening weekend.

Glasgow-based artist Andrew Sim brings together mythical creatures, ancient archetypes and pop culture references in Heal the Sick, Raise the Dead. This series of pastel works will address issues around mental health while situating queer histories within occult, alchemical and esoteric religious traditions.

 

Glasgow-based artist Jacqueline Donachie presents a project with Govan Project Space that engages directly with the city’s architectural heritage, questioning issues of access for all.

Presented by The Common Guild in off-site venues including The Glasgow Room upstairs at The Mitchell Library, Sharon Hayes’ major new project is the culmination of Ricerche, a suite of video works that the artist has been working on since 2013, which investigates public speech and its intersections with history, politics, activism, queer theory, love and sexuality.

The first presentation in Scotland by Nigerian artist Ndidi Dike, whose practice often examines global histories, including the pre- and post-colonial legacies of slavery, forced migration and resource extraction. Hushed considers the historic and ongoing impacts of the colonial cloth trade, paying particular attention to plants that have been used as sources of the blue dye indigo.

In the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, Annie Crabtree presents a dual screen, moving image work, Tell me, how do I feel?, which challenges the positioning of people as unreliable witnesses of their own bodies.

Group exhibitions include: Don’t Let The Bastards Grind You Down, starring Liv Fontaine, Paul Kindersley and Huhtamaki Wab, which explores the surreal, the political and the outrageous within the artist’s own lives and wider society.

Songs for Work brings together moving image, sound, performance, poetry and installation by three Glasgow-based artists – Aideen Doran, Beth Dynowski and Susannah Stark – to examine the effects of work on subjectivity, community, and wider social, political and ethical imaginaries.

The Outside is Inside Everything We Make, a group exhibition featuring new sculpture and works on paper by Laura Aldridge, Leanne Ross and Judith Scott, explores power and empowerment beyond that of established structures of experience. The title of the exhibition – a found text from product packaging – acknowledges the profound influence that daily interactions with people and materials have on us.

Events and Performances

Glasgow International have partnered with David Roberts Art Foundation (DRAF) to present a series of performances for the opening night. Each artist will develop different registers of attention throughout the evening, whether through the flickering presence of dancers, plays on folk, pop and opera, or the vulnerability of a changing world. Drawing on the festival’s history of fostering the development of live work, the event will encompass the broad spectrum of performance art in 2020 in the form of folk, pop or operatic pieces. Alongside those co-programmed with DRAF, there will be a series of performances organised by Glasgow-based Civic Room, featuring the work of artists who have either studied, or live, in Glasgow.

A partnership with the Hunterian Art Gallery and University of Glasgow sees a public lecture on attention and attentiveness given by renowned art historian and author TJ Clark. For further details and to book visit the news section of the GI website.

At the Rattle Library, a programme of films featuring shy heroes and neurodiverse icons brings to life Hamja Ahsan’s 2017 book Shy Radicals: The Antisystemic Politics of the Militant Introvert.

For one night only, a roller-shutter garage behind Glasgow’s Mitchell Library hosts Garage Vivant – a series of performances at the intersection between theatre and visual art in which Minty Donald, Neil McGuire and Nick Millar have invited other artists to respond to the concept of the tableau vivant.

Stepping Out, curated by Love Unlimited, brings together the work of eight artists and shines a spotlight on Glasgow’s diverse queer performance scene, offering insight into the thought, care and labour that underpins queer performance.

For Give us a Meow, Urara Tsuchiya has created the interior of an imaginary hotel room within a real Glasgow hotel – The Brunswick – producing new site-specific ceramic and textile works for the installation. The location will host a programme of performances by invited artists including Méabh Breathnach, Jack Brennan, Paul Kindersley, Susannah Stark, Mimei Thompson and Ben Toms.

Adam Christensen, SAGG Napoli, Jeanne Tullen and Nora Turato present Too Much: a live platform that stresses a separation between gender performativity and the regularisation of the theatre’s proscenium.

Bordered Miles, a day-long group walk from Glasgow city centre to Dungavel House Immigration Removal Centre conceived by Iranian-born, Glasgow-based artist Iman Tajik, takes place alongside an accompanying exhibition of documentation and talks at Civic House.

For a full list of projects in the Across the City Programme please visit: https://glasgowinternational.org/across-the-city-in-gi2020/

Richard Parry, Director of Glasgow International Festival said: “The theme for GI2020 is Attention, offering a chance for visitors to see what artists from Glasgow and across the world are turning their – and our – attention to right now. The festival offers us an unparalleled opportunity to take ourselves away from the seemingly constant distractions of screen and smartphone and instead to place our attention on what is happening in one of the most dynamic and energetic art scenes in the world.”

Culture Secretary Fiona Hyslop said: “Glasgow is a city where artists are not afraid to take risks, and where audiences are hungry for new and critically ambitious work.

“Glasgow International provides a unique platform to showcase the city and the best of its visual art and artists for the world. In 2020 the Scottish Government is providing £100,000 in EXPO funding to support projects initiated by freelance artists, curators and producers based in the city.”

Councillor David McDonald, Deputy Leader of Glasgow City Council and Chair of Glasgow Life, said: “Glasgow International is always keenly anticipated and a key component of the city’s vibrant cultural ecology, directly contributing to the future health, prosperity and sustainability of our city and its people. As a celebration of Scottish contemporary art it is unique in the way it takes people to venues they know to appreciate new work being made across Glasgow and into new or usually inaccessible spaces for exhibitions.”

Paul Bush OBE, VisitScotland’s Director of Events, said: “Glasgow is one of the UK’s leading cities for contemporary art, with the Glasgow International festival significantly contributing to this reputation by providing the perfect stage for local and international artists. The release of further details of this year’s programme, including the new film by Alberta Whittle in the Canal Programme which celebrates Scotland’s Year of Coasts and Waters 2020, shows this reputation is well founded.

“Events and festivals play a key role in our visitor economy and EventScotland is delighted to be continuing its support of Glasgow International in 2020.”

Amanda Catto, Head of Visual Arts, Creative Scotland said: “Creative Scotland is delighted to be a supporter of the GI Festival and is excited to see the details of the 2020 programme. Rooted in the city’s rich and supportive visual arts scene, the Festival is a highlight of the international, cultural calendar. Its unique format brings together commissions and exhibitions by artists living locally and internationally, in both large-scale and familiar public venues as well as across many smaller and less conventional sites.

“The tremendous depth, ambition and diversity of the programme will draw national and international visitors to the city while building audiences and engagement at a really local level. Congratulations to the GI team, its partners and all the artists involved.”

NEWS: OPERA HIGHLIGHTS SPRING TOUR TRAVELS TO 17 VENUES ACROSS SCOTLAND

Opera Highlights is back on the road on February 4, with four singers and a pianist journeying to 17 venues the length and breadth of Scotland, from Lerwick in the north to Castle Douglas in the south.

Following 17 performances in Autumn, the same Opera Highlights but with a new cast is travelling the highways and byways by land, sea and air. The Spring tour begins in Bathgate, then visits Birnam, Markinch, Campbeltown, Bowmore, Arrochar, Bunessan, Arisaig, Beauly, Cumnock, Castle Douglas, Callander, Lerwick, Peebles, Fochabers, Alford and Rutherglen.

Set in a beautiful garden, director Roxana Haines’ production features a playlist of operatic classics and must-hear rarities, curated by Scottish Opera’s Head of Music Derek Clark. Highlights include Delibes’ ‘Flower Duet’, Vaughan Williams’ ‘Blue larkspur in a garden’ and many more from the likes of Mozart, Lehár and Scottish Opera Composer in Residence, Samuel Bordoli.

Scottish Opera 2019/20 Emerging Artist repetiteur Michael Papadopoulos is the Pianist/Music Director, and is joined by soprano Zoe Drummond; mezzo-soprano Jade Moffat; tenor Andrew Irwin and baritone Arthur Bruce, The Robertson Trust Scottish Opera Emerging Artist this Season.

Roxana Haines, who directed Scottish Opera’s hit Edinburgh Festival Fringe show Fox-tot! this summer, said: ‘After a successful Autumn tour I am pleased to revive this Opera Highlights show, where the cast cordially invite you to a party on your doorstep. This Spring we have a brand new cast to guide you through our story which takes place in luscious gardens and magical flora and fauna of Opera. The stage has been set, decorations unpacked and the guests have all arrived but, the problem is we’re still not sure whose party this is…

‘As the evening progresses, the connections between our characters unravel through music from the likes of Handel, Donizetti and Mozart, and lighter pieces from Gilbert & Sullivan and Vaughan Williams as well as a new work by Samuel Bordoli. Prepare for an evening of charm, magic and love in all its operatic forms in a show that highlights the joy and absurdity of opera.’

This Opera Highlights tour is supported by The Friends of Scottish Opera, JTH Charitable Trust and The Scottish Opera Endowment Trust. Tickets are on sale from 11 December.

Image: Julie Broadfoot

NEWS: Swan Lake taking flight in 2020 with Scottish Ballet

Lose yourself in the raw intensity of this sleek and unmissable ballet, returning to Scotland after its sell-out 2016 debut.

Arching backs, spiralling arms and mesmerising patterns: the struggle between purity and seduction pushes our dancers to their physical limits. David Dawson’s daring, visceral choreography is perfectly paired with the rich, romantic Tchaikovsky score, played live by the Scottish Ballet Orchestra.

Tickets on sale to the general public 10am Tuesday 5 November.

Glasgow Theatre Royal

29 April – 2 May 2020

NEWS: BRENDAN COLE ANNOUNCES FINAL BIG BAND TOUR – SHOW MAN

Brendan Cole announces today that he will revive his hugely popular 2019 tour for 2020 Show Man, announcing this will be his last big band tour after 10 years of touring 5 exceptional critically acclaimed productions.  Show Man opens at Grimsby Auditorium 19 Feb 2020 before touring the UK and Ireland.

Taking its inspiration from the magic of theatre and the movies Show Man brings something for everyone.  With his amazingly talented hand-picked championship dancers and scorching eight piece live big band and singers, Brendan will bring audiences many of their favourite Strictly dance styles with choreography full of excitement, intimacy, emotion & skill. With laughter and chat throughout you are guaranteed to have a ball.  This is no ‘sit back and watch’ production;  Each show is full on high energy dance dynamite, up close and personal, with superb choreography, stunning lighting and amazing special effects. Expect a cheeky Charleston to Pencil Full of Lead, a sexy Salsa to Despacito, music from Beggin’ to Bublé, plus numbers from The Greatest Showman and La La Land.

Brendan Cole is best known from TV favourite Strictly Come Dancing where he danced the first show of the first series and lifted the very first glitterball trophy.

Show Man is Brendan’s fifth theatrical production and will see him tour the UK for the twelfth time . He has presented ten hugely successful concert tours to date: Live & Unjudged (2010/2011 x 2/2012), Licence to Thrill (2013 & 2014), A Night To Remember (2015/2016) and All Night Long (2017/2018)

Brendan tells us ‘I’m really excited to be bringing back Show Man having toured this production early in 2019 .  This is my most exciting tour to date it’s so dynamic and theatrical – much more so than any previous tour.  We have five male dancers, three female dancers, choirs, a violinist and brand new staging which allows the choreography to be exciting and different; bigger and better lifts, some very strong theatrical numbers as well as a new look set, it really is something special!  My aim is to wow the audience and give them everything they’d expect and much, much more.

Brendan continues ‘ This will be my last big band tour after touring for so many years. I’ve loved every second of being own the stage with my friends who have now become family. It’s time for something different and I’m honoured to be taking Show Man out for one last run. I’m so proud of this production and I’m going out on a high’

If you love live music from one of the best touring bands and exciting and emotive dance this is the show for you.  Don’t miss your chance to experience the ultimate Show Man at his best.

For more information and tour dates visit www.brendancolelive.com or www.pmbpresentations.com

Find us on Twitter and Facebook @BrendanColeTour

Wed 26-Feb    Aberdeen Music Hall              www.aberdeenperformingarts.com            01224 641122

Thu 27-Feb      Glasgow Royal Concert Hall   www.glasgowconcerthalls.com            0141 353 8000

Sat 29-Feb       Dunfermline Alhambra          www.alhambradunfermline.com            01383 740384 

Tue 03-Mar     Perth Concert Hall                  www.horsecross.co.uk                       01738 621031

Wed 04-Mar   Inverness Eden Court              www.eden-court.co.uk                      01463 234234

Images: Fiona Whyte

FEATURE: The Tron Ambassadors Programme Part 1

Since 2003 the Tron have enabled young people to experience a range of the career opportunities available within a fully operational theatre via the one-year Tron Ambassadors scheme. Through this scheme they foster deeper connections with the theatre itself, and the work they do both in-house and within the community, as well as an understanding of the wider theatre and creative arts industries.

Tron Ambassadors take part in regular workshops with Tron staff, external visitors and leading professionals to identify and develop transferable skills. Previous Tron Ambassadors have worked with the Tron’s production, marketing and front of house departments, theatre critics, set and costume designers and professional actors and directors. The programme also allows the Ambassadors to gain an Arts Award qualification from their full participation in the programme.

For the past four years, I have been lucky enough to work with these talented young people on the theatre criticism element of the programme. Always a joy to discover new voices and foster new talent in the field of arts criticism, I have also had the privilege of working with the most talented writers at The Reviews Hub.

Published here are the first batch of reviews of How Not to Drown, Dritan Kastrati’s perilous asylum story.

 

How Not to Drown

Reviewer: Holly Noble

Far too often we see on the news the horrific scenes of refugees fleeing their homes, family and friends just to get the taste of freedom. We see boats upturned, people struggling to swim and the terrifying death toll that increases every year. It isn’t often we hear a first-hand account from someone who was successful in the journey.

Dritan Kastrati’s How Not to Drown tells of his extraordinary personal story of loss, hardship and loneliness as he navigates his way to London, the danger of being caught always following him. What you often don’t hear is what happens after immigrants seek refuge. For Kastrati this was anything but easy; through learning a new culture and language, to trying to find a loving family through the foster care system.

The acting is excellent, giving you goose bumps, knowing that Kastrati is standing right in front of you as he tells you the story of his trials and tribulations.

The stage resembles a raft on an angle that spins around, this original device is effective in conveying the story. The small cast and the limited number of props are effective rather than distracting. The lighting and music is tied in well, giving you chills and adding drama.

After seeing How Not to Drown, it is clear, that it deserves all the recognition and awards it has received.

 

Reviewer: Astrid Allen

How not to drown is the story of Dritan Kastrati, an 11-year-old refugee from Kosovo travelling to the UK sent by his father to find his brother in London. Kastrati co-writer and actor performs his own life story, and the result is powerful and moving. The play explores what it is like to be torn between two cultures and the true inhuman nature of the UK fostering system.

In the first half of the play we get to see Dritan’s perilous journey on train, boat and lorry. The cast all have backgrounds in movement and director Neil Bettles choreographs movement with beautiful fluidity and keeps the audience in suspense during the journey.

When Dritan arrives in London he meets his 17 year old brother but they are soon separated and Dritan is put into foster care as his brother cannot legally look after him. He cannot understand why he would not be able to stay with his brother but he does not have the English to explain. Heartbreakingly, Dritan is put into a number of uncaring foster families until he is 16 and is legally allowed to leave care. He never truly feels at home with his carers and he can tell that none of them will ever really love him, Dritan misses his family and that feeling of being loved.

After his 16th birthday Dritan goes back to see his parents but they’ve moved from his childhood home and it doesn’t feel the same as it used to. Dritan is lost and no longer understands his own identity. This play is heart-wrenchingly honest, it holds nothing back from the audience and will invariably make you cry.

Reviewer: Devin McWhirter

Theatre has the power to portray important messages in an entertaining way and can draw a variety of emotions from audience members, and we see this in the extraordinary How not to Drown.

The play portrays the true story of Dritan Kastrati’s childhood and the dangerous journey from his war ridden home to the safety of his brother in London.

How Not to Drown, has the power both to draw you to the edge of your as it portrays Kastrati’s dangerous journey to get to London, and evoke anger and sadness at the discrimination and hardships he has had to face from the Law, Child Services and the carers he was forced to live with. It also moves greatly, particularly the scenes of him being torn away from his family.

How Not to Drown is a very relevant and important story that should be see and listened to by the widest audience possible.

Reviewer: Amy Waterston 

How Not to Drown is an exquisite piece of theatre which is a perfect example of theatre being a “mirror of society.”

The production’s use of the five versatile actors in multiple roles, not only showcases the cast’s acting ability, but also the intricate direction of the production, forcing the audience to realise the true horror of what is happening to people living in care today.

How Not to Drown captures these raw issues, due to the storyline following the real life of the lead actor Dritan Kastrati. The physicality of the piece draws the audience’s attention to the whirlwind of issues that Kastrati experienced. As an audience member, the piece really hits home as its impossible to question fact. This emphasised the upsetting reality and was a prime example of how powerful physical theatre can be.

Reviewer: Jacob McMillan

The story of a young Kosovan refugee and his treacherous journey through human smugglers, foster care, and life; told first-hand by the man he has become.
This play, from the staging to the sound design to the performances, is both heart-breaking and heart-warming. Caught in the middle of the Kosovan-Albanian war, Dritan Kastrati left his home at eleven but didn’t know that he would never truly find it again.
The staging in this performance is incredible; the slanted stage is simply genius. Throughout the play, the performers lean out, as if to tell a secret, to the audience. This creates a sense of involvement for the audience, you are on the smuggling boat or in the foster home with the protagonists. It is no wonder why this play won the Scotsman Fringe First Award.
Truly brilliant, it will be interesting to see what comes from next from Kastrati.

Reviewer: Stanley Stefani

How Not to Drown is a masterclass in theatrical storytelling, portrayed by the man who went through it.

Utilising the very clever use of a rotating slanted stage to add to the creativity throughout the play, Dritan Kastrati tells the emotionally compelling story of growing up and being forced to leave his home country to join his brother his London. Conveying the full journey that 11-year-old Dritan takes in order to escape the wars in his home.

This is a beautifully told story and is a must see for anyone with an interest in amazing pieces of theatre.

Reviewer: Euan Warnock

It is interesting to think that How Not To Drown is named the way it is, not just because of the instances of our real life protagonist panicking under the depths, but also because of the feeling that the performance engenders in you, a ‘sinking feeling’, right down to the caverns of your soul.

Right from the opening five minutes, all the way to the final third… as a matter of fact, those would be the most brilliant part of an already great drama, How Not To Drown manages to keep its audience captivated with an ever-twisting, ever-turning, (most of the time quite literally, with the remarkable stage design) real life tale of a little refugee boy trying to worm his way through the British asylum system.

The innovative set design, especially the smaller and raised addition on which the actors spend almost the entire performance, causes the show to feel even smaller in scale, but this disadvantage is used to a wonderful degree. Whenever the stage feels small, it is because it is meant to feel claustrophobic, and the way it moves, without spoiling anything, is used fantastically.

One of the main draws of this production is that it is a real life story, written and performed by the man (Dritan Kastrati) who lived through it, and for the final third of the play it becomes quite clear that he isn’t fully acting, he is still clearly feeling all of the emotions of how it happened all those years ago.

This is a five-star production, unique and expertly staged, with incredible acting, and a captivating story of a little boy washed up in the United Kingdom, trying to find his way along the path to happiness.

More Tron Ambassadors reviews to follow in part 2.

NEWS: SCOTTISH OPERA’S EMERGING ARTIST PROGRAMME CELEBRATES 10TH ANNIVERSARY AS SEVEN ARTISTS ARE WELCOMED FOR 2019/20 SEASON

Scottish Opera has welcomed a talented group of Emerging Artists for the 2019/20 Season: Samuel Bordoli, Arthur Bruce, Jasmine Clark, Charlie Drummond, Mark Nathan, Michael Papadopoulos and Lucy Walters.

The Scottish Opera Emerging Artists programme was launched in 2009 and offers young artists a period of full-time work with the Company to help them launch their careers. Initially set up to nurture outstanding young singers, the programme now also includes positions for a repetiteur, costume trainee, a composer in residence, and, for the first time, an associate producer. Previous Emerging Artists include soprano Jennifer France, repetiteur Jonathon Swinard, baritone Ben McAteer and composers Gareth Williams and Lliam Paterson.

Alex Reedijk, Scottish Opera General Director said: ‘It’s a great pleasure to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Emerging Artists programme, which has over 40 alumni, with many of those having gone on to perform all over the UK. The incredibly flexible programme helps a tremendous breadth of artists at the start of their careers through an immersive opera company experience where they can draw on all the resources available to strengthen their skills, preparing them for a life in the performing arts. I also have to acknowledge the generosity of our supporters who have from day one been genuinely delighted to help support the Emerging Artists, and how much that support has grown over 10 years.’

Samuel Bordoli ARAM returns for a third year as composer in residence. In the 2018/19 Season, he composed an Overture and To Music for the Autumn 2018 Opera Highlights tour, as well as Le trésor des humbles for soprano and orchestra, premiered in March at Aberdeen’s Music Hall. During the Company’s 2017/18 Season he composed Wings and three piano interludes for the Opera Highlights tour, and Grace Notes to complement the Company’s production of Ariadne auf Naxos.

Samuel studied at Birmingham Conservatoire and London’s Royal Academy of Music, where he was the Mendelssohn Scholar. He was mentored by Peter Maxwell Davies for nine years. His broad output has included a chamber opera, Amerika, performed at the Tête à Tête opera festival in London, and a choral anthem, The Great Silence, premiered at the Windsor Festival for the Queen’s 90th Birthday. His music theatre piece Belongings was premiered on the Caledonian Sleeper between Aberdeen and London. He has also composed four Live Music Sculptures, site-specific compositions for London landmarks, including Tower Bridge, the Monument and St Paul’s Cathedral, and last year he co-produced Planets 2018, a new ‘Planets Suite’ performed inside planetariums across the UK.

This Season, Samuel is working on an original short digital opera film and a prelude to A Midsummer Night’s Dream entitled Hermia’s Nightmare, and he composed a new piece for Opera Highlights. For his work at Scottish Opera, Samuel was nominated for the ‘One to Watch’ Award at the 2018 Sunday Herald Culture Awards.

Scottish baritone Arthur Bruce is The Robertson Trust Scottish Opera Emerging Artist 2019/20. A graduate of the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland’s Alexander Gibson Opera School, the Royal Northern College of Music and English National Opera’s Opera Works programme, Arthur was a member of Scottish Opera Young Company (formerly Connect). He has performed roles with Bampton Classical Opera, Berlin Opera Academy, Saffron Opera Group, Opera Eos, Edinburgh Grand Opera, London Young Sinfonia, Edinburgh Players Opera Group and Bowdon Festival Opera. He is also a Britten-Pears Young Artist. This Season at Scottish Opera, Arthur is performing in Amadeus & The Bard: 18th Century Cosmic Brothers, a new production about the links between Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Robert Burns. He also goes on tour with Opera Highlights in the Spring, and performs in Iris, Utopia, Limited and The Gondoliers which tours to Glasgow, Aberdeen, Inverness, Edinburgh and London.

Elizabeth Salvesen Costume Trainee Jasmine Clark will work on Scottish Opera’s Season 2019/20 productions in the Costume Department, headed by John Liddell. Graduating in 2017 with a 1st Class BA (Hons) Costume and Performance Design (Costume Interpretation) degree from Arts University Bournemouth with a particular interest in historical costume, Jasmine has worked on a number of operas, musicals, short films and television programmes. These include La bohème at the Royal Opera House, The Pilgrim’s Progress at Royal Northern College of Music, Les Misérables at Birmingham Hippodrome and the BBC drama Father Brown. Former Student Head of Arts University Bournemouth Costume Archive, in her spare time Jasmine has volunteered as a Tattershall Tailor at National Trust Tattershall Castle, Lincolnshire, creating historically accurate medieval costumes for staff to wear at events.

Soprano Charlie Drummond is an alumna of King’s College London (English Literature), the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland’s Alexander Gibson Opera School and the National Opera Studio. She is a Samling Young Artist and the recipient of several awards including the Help Musicians UK Tutton Award, an Independent Opera Voice Scholarship, the Musicians’ Company Silver Medal and the Bruce Millar Gulliver Prize. Charlie has performed with companies including Longborough Festival Opera, British Youth Opera and Raucous Rossini. She also has a keen interest in contemporary opera and has premiered the role of Serena Farage in the new opera The Secretary Turned CEO (Lucid Arts), and performed in the world premiere of Simoon by Erik Chisholm (Music Co-OPERAtive Scotland).  This Season at Scottish Opera she will perform in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Iris, The Gondoliers, Utopia, Limited and the Company’s Opera Highlights Autumn tour.

Baritone Mark Nathan studied at the Alexander Gibson Opera School, having graduated with distinction from a Master’s at London’s Royal College of Music. He completed an undergraduate Music degree at Birmingham University. Mark has worked with opera companies including Welsh National Opera, Opera Loki, Hampstead Garden Opera and Winterbourne Opera, performing roles including Don Giovanni, Papageno, Marcello and Dr Falke. He has also appeared in musicals including Guys and Dolls and Into the Woods.

Mark is in demand as a recitalist and oratorio soloist, and is a keen lyricist, having written several musicals, and a collection of children’s poems entitled ‘Riddle Me This’, which has been set to music by Ronald Corp for the New London Children’s Choir. Mark plays the cello, piano, bass guitar, acoustic guitar, accordion, and the banjo. He plays in chamber ensembles, orchestras and pit bands. This season at Scottish Opera he will perform in A Midsummer Night’s DreamThe Gondoliers and the Opera Highlights Autumn tour.

London-born repetiteur and conductor Michael Papadopoulos is the 2019/20 Emerging Artist repetiteur. He trained at the National Opera Studio and the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, having previously read Music at Trinity College Oxford. As a repetiteur, he has worked at Opera Holland Park (La traviata, Isabeau, Il segreto di Susanna), where he was Young Artist Repetiteur for the 2018 season, and British Youth Opera (Don Giovanni), as well as working on Julian Philllips’ The Tale of Januarie at GSMD. Recent conducting projects include a new opera by Edward Lambert for the 2019 Tête à Tête festival (Apollo’s Mission), Bach’s St John Passion, Brahms’s Ein deutsches Requiem, and Handel’s Messiah (with the choir and musicians of St Paul’s Knightsbridge), and Daniel Saleeb’s Occo’s Eternal Act at the Victoria and Albert Museum. This Season at Scottish Opera, Michael will be working on Susanna’s Secret, Tosca, Nixon in China, The Gondoliers and Utopia, Limited, as assistant conductor on Iris and as Music Director/Pianist on the Opera Highlights Spring tour.

Lucy Walters is the Emerging Artist associate producer. After studying music at the University of Bristol and the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama, Lucy interned at Wigmore Hall where she assisted the Learning Team with their administration and events. She then joined the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra as the Chorus Projects Officer, primarily working with the CBSO’s family of symphonic choruses on large-scale choral projects, performances with other orchestras, and chorus international touring. While at the CBSO, Lucy helped to co-ordinate the 2014 BBC Proms Youth Choir (Britten’s War Requiem with the CBSO and Andris Nelsons) before managing the project in 2015 (Elgar’s Dream of Gerontius with Vienna Philharmonic and Sir Simon Rattle). Since leaving the CBSO in 2016, Lucy has enjoyed refocusing on her passion for Opera in the Opera North Planning Team where she managed residencies for the National Opera Studio and Royal Northern College of Music. Jointly appointed by Opera Ventures and Scottish Opera, Lucy is primarily working on the future life of the Company’s co-production of Breaking the Waves over the next year.

The Emerging Artist singers and repetiteur will perform in four recitals; at the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh in October, University of St Andrews in November, and the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland and the University of Glasgow in January.

The Emerging Artists are supported by The Robertson Trust, Elizabeth Salvesen, Idlewild Trust and Scottish Opera’s Emerging Artist Benefactors.

 

Performance Diary

 

Fri 25 October, 6.30pm

National Museum of Scotland, Edinburgh

 

Wed 20 November, 1pm

University of St Andrews

 

Fri 10 January, 1pm

Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, Glasgow

 

Thu 16 January, 1.10pm

University of Glasgow

www.scottishopera.org.uk

Image: James Glossop – Scottish Opera Emerging Artists (left to right) Lucy Walters, Mark Nathan, Arthur Bruce, Charlie Drummond, Jasmine Clark and Michael Papadopoulos

NEWS: LES MISÉRABLES will make its Glasgow premiere next year with a four-week run at Theatre Royal.

Cameron Mackintosh has today announced that his acclaimed production of LES MISÉRABLES will make its Glasgow premiere next year with a four-week run at Theatre Royal.

The Boublil and Schönberg musical LES MISÉRABLES will open on Wednesday 3 June until Saturday 27 June 2020. This will be the first Cameron Mackintosh production to be staged in Glasgow in over 15 years, the last being Miss Saigon at the King’s Theatre in 2004.

Tickets go on sale to Theatre Card holders on Monday 21 October. There will be a Groups presale on Wednesday 23 October and a Sign-up pre-sale on Friday 25 October. General onsale opens on Wednesday 30 October.

James Haworth, Theatre Director at Theatre Royal, said: “I am extremely excited to welcome LES MISÉRABLES to Theatre Royal and to Glasgow for the first time next year. It is such a prestigious and revered musical and the calibre of Cameron Mackintosh’s productions is outstanding. This will also be the first Cameron Mackintosh production to come to Glasgow in over 15 years which makes the run especially significant to the Theatre Royal and the city. I look forward to welcoming all who come along to see this iconic production.”

Since Cameron Mackintosh first conceived this new production of “Les Misérables” in 2009 to celebrate the show’s 25th anniversary it has taken the world by storm. Originally touring the UK throughout 2009/10, and concluding with 22 performances at the Barbican, this production was hailed by audiences and critics alike.

This current production, embraced by modern audiences across the globe as a Les Mis for the 21st century, has sold out in record breaking time in each venue it has played since opening in 2018.

This production also inspired the hugely successful movie version starring Hugh Jackman, Anne Hathaway and Eddie Redmayne. This brilliant new staging has scenery inspired by the paintings of Victor Hugo,and has to date already been seen in North America, Brazil, Mexico, Korea, Japan, Canada, Australia, Spain, France, Manila, Singapore, Dubai and Broadway.

Boublil and Schönberg’s magnificent score of LES MISÉRABLES includes the songs, “I Dreamed a Dream”, “On My Own”, “Stars”, “Bring Him Home”, “Do You Hear the People Sing?”, “One Day More”, “Empty Chairs at Empty Tables”, “Master Of The House” and many more.  Seen by over 120 million people worldwide in 52 countries and in 22 languages, LES MISÉRABLES is undisputedly one of the world’s most popular musicals.

Dean Chisnall will play ‘Jean Valjean’, Nic Greenshields ‘Javert’, Katie Hall ‘Fantine’, Ian Hughes ‘Thénardier’, Harry Apps ‘Marius’, Charlie Burn ‘Cosette’, Barnaby Hughes ‘Enjolras’ and Helen Walsh ‘Madame Thénardier’.

Also in the cast will be Joseph Anthony, George Arvidson, Adam Boardman, Olivia Brereton, Danny Colligan, Rebecca Ferrin, Aimee Good, Jenna Innes, Ebony Jonelle, Robert Madge, Liam Marcellino, Emily Owens, Jordan Simon Pollard, Corinne Priest, Jamie Pritchard, Aaron Pryce-Lewis, Dean Read and Janne Snellen. Further casting to be announced soon.

Images: Matthew Murphy

WHAT’S ON FEBRUARY: MUSICAL COMEDY DUO FLO & JOAN COME TO THE STAND

It was announced today, that amidst the release of their first comedy special on Amazon Prime Video and performing a sell-out run at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe including two extra shows at 3pm on Monday 19th and 7.30pm on Sunday 25th at Assembly Piccolo Tent, musical comedy duo Flo & Joan are set to embark on a UK tour of their brand new show Before the Screaming Starts from 28th October. They will visit The Stand in Glasgow on 10 February 2020. Tickets are now on sale at floandjoan.com

This follows Flo & Joan appearing at this year’s Just For Laughs Festival in Montreal at The Hasan Minhaj Gala and as part of the prestigious Brit(ish) lineup, as well as a hugely successful run at the 2019 Melbourne International Comedy Festival.

In January, the suspiciously unsimilar sisters Flo & Joan – whose songs have racked up over 50 million views online – watched the Bros documentary. Through the tension and arguments of estranged siblings Matt and Luke Goss, Flo & Joan glimpsed a possible future waiting for them; a lot of dog portraits, male pattern baldness and the occasional argument over the use of pyrotechnics. Despite this ominous foreshadowing, they are doing their best to ignore the warning signs with more waggish songs to parade about the place in their brand new show Before the Screaming Starts.

The success of their latest show follows a complete sell-out run at last year’s Edinburgh Festival Fringe which saw them add five extra shows and embark on their debut UK tour. Nicola and Rosie’s television and radio credits include Rob Delaney’s Stand Up Central (Comedy Central), The Now Show (BBC Radio 4) and Fresh from the Fringe (BBC Radio 4), writing and performing two songs for Horrible Histories (CBBC) and they have also had an enormous viral hit online with their 2016 Song which was subsequently featured on websites including Comedy Central (where it was video of the day worldwide), A.V. Club, Glamour and Stylist.

Elsewhere the pair also wrote and starred in a series of adverts for Nationwide Building Society, with their video Sisters being rated YouTube’s most popular advert in January 2018, and have established a sell-out monthly residency hosted at London’s Brasserie Zedel. In 2016, 2017 and 2019 they were part of the Best of the Fest selections at Toronto and Montreal Sketchfests, also winning the Now Audience Choice Award in Toronto and their Canadian TV credits include CBC’s flagship comedy show This Hour Has 22 Minutes and a series of videos for CBC Online.

NEWS: SCOTTISH OPERA ANNOUNCES 2019/20 SEASON

Stuart Stratford, Scottish Opera Music Director and Alex Reedijk, General Director. Scottish Opera 2019

Scottish Opera has unveiled its 2019/20 Season which includes a European premiere at the Edinburgh International Festival, three further new productions, one revival, six titles in the Opera in Concert series, and the world premiere of a new ‘opera for toddlers’ at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe.

A truly international line-up of singers appears throughout the Season. Making their debuts with the Company are Trevor Eliot Bowes, Orla Boylan, Wallis Giunta, Eric Greene, Byron Jackson and Sydney Mancasola.

There are welcome return visits from Evez Abdulla, Mark Le Brocq, Richard Burkhard, Emma Carrington, Sioned Gwen Davies, Aidan Edwards, Jennifer France, Morten Grove Frandsen, Ric Furman, Justina Gringyte, Katie Grosset, Aled Hall, Hanna Hipp, Charlotte Hoather, Paul Carey Jones, Gwyn Hughes Jones, Ellie Laugharne, Jessica Leary, Hye-Youn Lee, Nicholas Lester, Jamie MacDougall, Ben McAteer, William Morgan, Lancelot Nomura, Clare Presland, Sarah Pring, Daniel Keating-Roberts, Duncan Rock, Natalya Romaniw, David Shipley, Michel de Souza, Julia Sporsén, David Stout, Richard Suart, Elgan Llŷr Thomas, Freddie Tong, Sinéad Campbell-Wallace, Roland Wood and Dingle Yandell.

Alex Reedijk, General Director, said: ‘This Season, Scottish Opera brings a diverse range of titles, including 12 operas, to audiences in over 50 venues all over Scotland and beyond. From 20th century masterpieces by Benjamin Britten and John Adams to much-loved works by Gilbert & Sullivan and Puccini, and an intriguing Opera in Concert series curated by Music Director Stuart Stratford, there is a wonderful array of operatic fare.

‘Directing our full-scale productions are five great talents: Jonathan Cocker, who is reviving Anthony’s Besch’s iconic Tosca which opens the Season; John Fulljames; Dominic Hill; Tom Morris and Stuart Maunder. Creative partnerships are crucial to what we do, so it’s thrilling to be working alongside festivals, companies and opera houses locally, nationally and internationally. The Company is greatly looking forward to returning to the Lammermuir Festival, and to taking Missy Mazzoli’s sensational Breaking the Waves to the Edinburgh International Festival.

‘The ever-inventive Outreach and Education Department builds on the success of our work for young children with the world premiere of Fox-tot!, by the brilliant, young Scottish composer Lliam Paterson, at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. Scottish Opera Young Company returns to the stage with Sondheim; we present three Dementia Friendly performances as well as Spinning Songs and Memory Spinners workshops; and we tour Pop-up Opera, The Opera Factory and our Primary Schools Tour.’

Stuart Stratford, Scottish Opera Music Director, added: ‘We are committed to exploring some lesser known repertoire in our Opera in Concert performances, and I am delighted that we are continuing our Mascagni odyssey with a double bill of Zanetto, performed with Wolf- Ferrari’s Susanna’s Secret. Mascagni’s Iris is also not to be missed, and the series comes full circle to finish with Cavalleria rusticana, the piece that catapulted Mascagni to success. It is paired with Leoncavallo’s Zingari. Another rarity can be heard in our semi-staged performance of Gilbert & Sullivan’s Utopia, Limited, which stands alongside our new touring production of The Gondoliers.

‘I am thrilled our new Season gets underway at the Edinburgh International Festival with the European premiere of Breaking the Waves by the exciting American composer, Missy Mazzoli. Nixon in China is another modern American classic. It still resonates with today’s global politics, and it changed the rulebook of what contemporary opera could be. John Adams’ soundworld continues to influence generations of new composers. Benjamin Britten’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream completes our trio of work from the 20th and 21st centuries, with a new staging by Citizens Theatre Artistic Director, Dominic Hill.’

Season 2019/20 Productions

Missy Mazzoli’s Breaking the Waves has its European premiere at the Edinburgh International Festival in August.

Tony Award-winning Tom Morris, Artistic Director of Bristol Old Vic, whose previous work includes War HorseTouching the Void, and The Death of Klinghoffer at English National Opera and the Metropolitan Opera, New York, directs this dark and daring opera. Set and costume designs are by Soutra Gilmour.

Based on Lars von Trier’s award-winning film, Mazzoli’s opera caused a sensation when it premiered in 2016, winning the 2017 Best New Opera Award from the Music Critics Association of North America. It was also shortlisted for an International Opera Award.

The opera, with a libretto by Royce Vavrek, tells the story of Bess, a young woman living in a deeply religious community in the Scottish Highlands in the 1970s. The cast includes American soprano Sydney Mancasola, Edinburgh-born baritone Duncan Rock and Irish-Canadian mezzo Wallis Giunta, winner of the 2018 International Opera Awards’ Young Singer of the Year. Scottish Opera Music Director Stuart Stratford conducts.

Co-presented by Opera Ventures, Scottish Opera and Edinburgh International Festival, Breaking the Waves is a co-production with Opera Ventures and Houston Grand Opera, in association with Bristol Old Vic. It has been made possible with support from Howard and Sarah Solomon Foundation, Denise Coates Foundation, Karl Sydow, Scottish Opera’s New Commissions Circle, The Aaron Copland Fund for Music and a syndicate of donors.

Puccini’s Tosca, in a production originally directed by Anthony Besch and designed by Peter Rice in 1980, opens Scottish Opera’s main season in October.  Set in 1940s Rome, in the shadow of Mussolini’s dictatorship, this ill-fated romance plays out against a backdrop of political corruption and intrigue. Revived by director Jonathan Cocker and conducted by Stuart Stratford, this much-loved production stars Natalya Romaniw (Eugene Onegin 2018) in the title role, Gwyn Hughes Jones (Il trovatore 2015) as Cavaradossi and Roland Wood (Pelléas & Mélisande 2017) as Scarpia. Tosca is supported by The Scottish Opera Syndicate.

In February, John Fulljames, Director of Opera at The Royal Danish Theatre, directs John Adams’ iconic opera, Nixon in China, inspired by President Richard Nixon’s much-publicised 1972 visit to Communist China. A Scottish Opera premiere, this is a new co-production with The Royal Danish Theatre and Teatro Real Madrid.

Acclaimed Portuguese conductor Joana Carneiro leads an exciting cast including Eric Greene as Richard Nixon; Julia Sporsén (Ariadne auf Naxos 2018); Mark Le Brocq (Anthropocene 2019); Nicholas Lester (The Trial 2017) and Hye-Youn Lee (La bohème 2017). The libretto is by Alice Goodman and the designer is Dick Bird (The Mikado 2016).

Dominic Hill, Artistic Director of the Citizens Theatre, returns to Scottish Opera to direct Benjamin Britten’s atmospheric A Midsummer Night’s Dream. He is joined by designer Tom Piper, famed for the Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red installation at the Tower of London. Stuart Stratford conducts a cast that includes David Shipley (Rigoletto 2018), a recent graduate of the Jette Parker Young Artists Programme; countertenor Morten Grove Frandsen, a winner of Denmark’s Reumert Talent prize; former Scottish Opera Emerging Artist Jennifer France (Anthropocene 2019); and Scottish tenor and BBC broadcaster Jamie MacDougall (Ariadne auf Naxos 2018).  Audiences also have the chance to see a new work by Scottish Opera Composer in Residence, Samuel Bordoli, titled Hermia’s Nightmare. Performed in the foyer before each show, it explores scenes from Shakespeare’s play that were not included by Britten in his score. A Midsummer Night’s Dream is supported by The Alexander Gibson Circle.

The 2019/20 Season closes with Gilbert & Sullivan’s The Gondoliers, directed by Stuart Maunder, Artistic Director at State Opera South Australia, and designed by Dick Bird (The Mikado 2016). The whimsical opera, in a new co-production with D’Oyly Carte Opera and State Opera South Australia, tells the story of two happy-go-lucky gondoliers who discover that one of them is, in fact, heir to the throne of a distant kingdom. Scottish Opera’s Head of Music, Derek Clark, conducts an ensemble cast that includes ENO Harewood Artist William Morgan (The Magic Flute 2019), Ellie Laugharne (The Pirates of Penzance 2013), Ben McAteer (The Mikado 2016), Sioned Gwen Davies (Rigoletto 2018) and G&S favourite Richard Suart (The Mikado 2016).  As well as performances in Glasgow, Aberdeen, Inverness and Edinburgh, The Gondoliers tours to London’s Hackney Empire. This production is supported by Scottish Opera’s ‘Play A Supporting Role’ Appeal.

Opera in Concert

Scottish Opera Music Director, Stuart Stratford, has once again curated a programme of rarely-performed works in this Season’s Opera in Concert series, supported by the Scottish Opera Endowment Trust and the Friends of Scottish Opera. The semi-staged performances explore further the verismo works of Pietro Mascagni and a lesser-known piece by Gilbert & Sullivan in several firsts for Scottish Opera, and for Scotland.

In September, the Company returns to the award-winning Lammermuir Festival in East Lothian with a double-bill of Mascagni’s Zanetto (a Scottish Opera premiere) and Susanna’s Secret by Wolf-Ferrari. Soloists including Sinéad Campbell-Wallace, Hanna Hipp (Kátya Kabanová 2019), Richard Burkhard (The Magic Flute 2019) and Clare Presland (Rusalka 2016) are conducted by David Parry (La traviata 2017), and directed by Rosie Purdie.

Performed in the beautiful, mediaeval St Mary’s Parish Church in Haddington, the venue for 2018’s Scottish Opera performance of The Burning Fiery Furnace, Zanetto is set in the hills above Renaissance Florence, and tells the story of Silvia, a lonely courtesan who has lost her faith in love, until she meets a wandering minstrel.

It is performed alongside the sophisticated and charming Susanna’s Secret, the perfect comedic contrast, in which a husband who smells smoke on his wife’s clothes accuses her of cheating.

In December, Opera in Concert features the Scottish Opera premiere of Mascagni’s Iris at City Halls, Glasgow. A gripping tale of innocence lost, Iris includes the stunning ‘Hymn to the Sun’, which is often hailed as the composer’s finest writing. Stuart Stratford conducts soloists including Ric Furman (Kátya Kabanová 2019), Natalya Romaniw (Eugene Onegin 2018) and Roland Wood (Pelléas and Mélisande 2017). Roxana Haines (Edgar 2018) directs.

The passionate and lyrical Cavalleria rusticana by Mascagni is performed in May 2020 at the Usher Hall, Edinburgh. Telling the tale of a young Sicilian villager who returns from war to find his fiancée has married someone else, conductor Stuart Stratford has chosen to pair it with Leoncavallo’s lesser-known work Zingari, another Scottish Opera premiere. With a parallel narrative that sees another love triangle go disastrously wrong, Zingari is based on Pushkin’s The Gypsies. Orpha Phelan directs soloists including Evez Abdulla, Justina Gringyte and Julia Sporsén.

The Opera in Concert series ends with a semi-staged performance of Utopia, Limited. A new co-production with D’Oyly Carte Opera and State Opera South Australia, this Scottish Opera premiere has an updated libretto by director Stuart Maunder, and a new musical version by Scottish Opera’s Head of Music, Derek Clark, who also conducts. Wittily satirising the British Empire’s politics, monarchy and press, Gilbert & Sullivan’s penultimate opera is performed by the cast of The Gondoliers, and designed by Dick Bird. Utopia, Limited tours to Glasgow, Edinburgh and Hackney Empire in London.

Opera Highlights

Supported by the Friends of Scottish Opera, the ever-popular Opera Highlights goes on the road again this Season, visiting 34 venues around Scotland from Stonehaven to Stranraer, in Autumn 2019 and Spring 2020. The varied programme of music curated by Scottish Opera’s Head of Music, Derek Clark, sees four singers and a pianist perform works by Mozart, Rossini, Donizetti and Gilbert & Sullivan, and a new piece by Scottish Opera Composer in Residence Samuel Bordoli.

Roxana Haines (Edgar 2018) directs two different casts of exciting new talent including Scottish Opera’s Emerging Artists for 2019/20 – soprano Charlie Drummond, former young artist at the National Opera Studio; baritone Mark Nathan, recent graduate from the Opera School at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland; and baritone Arthur Bruce, a former member of the Scottish Opera Young Company also recently graduated from the RCS Opera School.

Fox-tot! – an opera for toddlers

The world premiere of Fox-tot!, a new opera for toddlers aged one to two, is presented at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe this summer. It has been written by Lliam Paterson, composer of the acclaimed BambinO, which last year toured to Paris and New York’s Metropolitan Opera, and is directed by Roxana Haines (Edgar 2018).

For this new Scottish Opera co-commission with Royal & Derngate, Northampton, Lliam has taken inspiration from French baroque dances and contemporary opera. A little fox goes on an adventure to explore the world and learn to see through the eyes of other creatures. Stretched out in the sun as a cat, soaring in the sky as a butterfly, it’s fun to be someone else. But, as Mother Vixen guides her cub’s journey, will the little one discover what it takes to become an excellent fox?

Designed by Giuseppe Belli and Emma Belli (BambinO 2017), the 45-minute show is an engaging mix of music and puppetry, performed by mezzo-soprano and former Scottish Opera Emerging Artist Katie Grosset (The Opera Factory 2018), and countertenor Daniel Keating-Roberts (The 8th Door 2017). They are joined by cellist Laura Sergeant and percussionist Michael D Clark, who both performed in BambinO.

Following the Edinburgh Festival Fringe dates at Edinburgh Academy, Fox-tot! tours to Royal and Derngate, Northampton in August and September, and around Scotland in Spring 2020.

Fox-tot! is supported by Scottish Opera’s Education Angels, New Commissions Circle and using public funding by Arts Council England.

Scottish Opera Young Company

Scottish Opera Young Company, for 17 to 25 year olds, will perform Stephen Sondheim’s Merrily We Roll Along in Glasgow in the Spring of 2020. Young Company Artistic Director Jonathon Swinard conducts Sondheim’s multi-Olivier Award-winning work, which was specifically written for young adult voices. A dark tale of ambition and disillusion, it tells the story of Franklin Shepard whose career has seen him go from penniless composer to Hollywood impresario. Merrily We Roll Along is supported by Scottish Opera’s Education Angels.

Pop-up Opera

Three brilliant Pop-up Opera shows hit the road this summer in Scottish Opera’s specially adapted trailer at festivals and events around Scotland: A Little Bit of Iolanthe (supported by The D’Oyly Carte Charitable Trust), A Little Bit of Magic Flute, and Puffy McPuffer and The Crabbit Canals, for five to eight year olds. Each performance is 25 minutes long and brought to life by storyteller Ross Stenhouse, sopranos Jessica Leary and Charlotte Hoather, baritone Aidan Edwards, instrumentalists and colourful illustrations. The tour includes Perth Festival of the Arts, Dunfermline, Dumfries & Galloway Arts Festival, Old Kilpatrick, Barrhead, Giffnock, Borders Book Festival, Dirleton, Callander, Cupar Arts EDEN, Aboyne & Deeside Festival, Haddington Show and Glasgow Canal Festival. Pop-up Opera is supported by Scottish Opera’s Education Angels.

Emerging Artists

The Scottish Opera Emerging Artists programme, which offers young talent a period of full-time work with the Company to help launch their careers, will this Season include soprano Charlie Drummond, baritones Arthur Bruce and Mark Nathan, and Samuel Bordoli who continues as Composer in Residence. The name of a costume trainee and repetiteur are still to be announced.

Emerging Artist singers perform in a number of this Season’s productions and tours, and in recitals at the University of St Andrews, Royal Conservatoire of Scotland and University of Glasgow, and are supported by The Robertson Trust, Elizabeth Salvesen and Scottish Opera’s Emerging Artist Benefactors.

Scottish Opera Education and Outreach

Amadeus & The Bard is an original piece, conceived, written and directed by Mary McCluskey, former Artistic Director of Scottish Youth Theatre. It explores the surprising number of parallels between Mozart and Scottish poet, Robert Burns.

Performed by Scottish Opera Emerging Artist Arthur Bruce, soprano and Samling Young Artist Stephanie Stanway and renowned actor Andy Clark, alongside a four-voice ensemble from the Scottish Opera Young Company, the programme is curated by Scottish Opera’s Head of Music Derek Clark. It celebrates the work of the two 18th-century Enlightenment giants, from the magical and mystical in The Magic Flute and Tam O’ Shanter to the love music of Don Giovanni and A Red, Red Rose. The Music Director and pianist is Karen MacIver, one half of award-winning duo PianoPiano.

Amadeus & The Bard tours this Autumn to Earlston, Kirkcudbright, Annan, Cumnock, Ayr, Largs, Edinburgh, Glasgow and Paisley. It is supported by Edith Rudinger Gray Charitable Trust and Scottish Opera’s Education Angels.

In the Spring and Summer of 2020, the ever-popular Primary Schools Tour, for children in primaries five to seven, revives Warriors! The Emperor’s Incredible Army. It offers kids the chance to participate in high quality, day-long music theatre workshops, culminating in a performance for parents and guests. Commissioned in partnership with the five Scottish Confucius Institutes, music is by Alan Penman with words by Ross Stenhouse.

The Opera Factory, written and presented by Allan Dunn, returns this summer. Primary 3 pupils go on a whirlwind music adventure to find out how opera is made. The production is supported by online resources designed to reinforce key learning outcomes of A Curriculum for Excellence for Level 1.

Scottish Opera’s Community Choir, open to adults of all ages and conducted by Katy Lavinia Cooper, starts up again in September. The choir sings a mixture of opera, classical, popular, folk and world music, and meets every Wednesday at Theatre Royal Glasgow.

Dementia Friendly

There will be three Dementia Friendly performances of Tosca, in Glasgow, Aberdeen and Edinburgh. This fully-staged, shortened version of the show features presenter Allan Dunn, The Orchestra of Scottish Opera and a cast of singers. Lighting levels in the auditorium are adjusted and audiences are able to come in and out of the auditorium or watch in the bar on TV screens if they prefer.  Scottish Opera staged the UK’s first Dementia Friendly opera performance in November 2016, with The Marriage of Figaro at Festival Theatre Edinburgh.

Memory Spinners, shortlisted in the Best Community Initiative category of Scotland’s Dementia Awards 2017, continues to meet weekly in Glasgow, Edinburgh and Airdrie. The groups – for people living with dementia and their carers – help them relax and get creative using music, storytelling, movement and the visual arts.

Weekly Spinning Songs in East Kilbride and Edinburgh are also taking place. This new intergenerational project for pre-school and primary children and elderly people helps participants develop their musical and expressive arts skills to create original songs that reflect life in their local communities.

Insights into opera

Opera Unwrapped performances offer a one-hour opera taster, ideal for anyone curious to learn more about the art form, how a show is created or some backstage secrets. There are Unwrapped performances of Tosca, Nixon in China and A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Audiences can also find out more about the opera they are seeing in pre-show talks. People with a visual impairment can enjoy the full opera experience at audio-described performances, where a live commentary describes the action on stage without compromising the music.

Breaking the Waves (Missy Mazzoli)

King’s Theatre, Edinburgh (Part of the Edinburgh International Festival)

21, 23, 24 Aug 2019, 7.15pm

 

Tosca (Puccini)

Theatre Royal Glasgow

16, 18, 22, 26 Oct 2019, 7.15pm
20 Oct 2019, 3pm
Dementia Friendly Performance 24 Oct 2019, 3pm

His Majesty’s Theatre, Aberdeen                                       

31 Oct | 2 Nov 2019, 7.15pm
Dementia Friendly Performance 1 Nov 2019, 3pm

Eden Court, Inverness

5, 7, 9 Nov 2019, 7.15pm

Festival Theatre Edinburgh

14, 21, 23 Nov 2019, 7.15pm
17 Nov 2019, 3pm
Dementia Friendly Performance 19 Nov 2019, 3pm

 

Nixon in China (John Adams)

Theatre Royal Glasgow

18, 20, 22 Feb 2020, 7.15pm

Festival Theatre Edinburgh

27, 29 Feb 2019, 7.15pm

 

A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Benjamin Britten)

Festival Theatre Edinburgh

31 Mar | 2, 4 Apr 2020, 7.15pm

Theatre Royal Glasgow

21, 23, 25 Apr 2020, 7.15pm

 

The Gondoliers (Gilbert & Sullivan)

Theatre Royal Glasgow

14, 15, 16, 22, 23 May 2020 7.15pm
17 May 2020, 2.30pm

His Majesty’s Theatre, Aberdeen

28, 29, 30 May 2020, 7.15pm

Eden Court, Inverness

3, 4, 5, 6 Jun 2020, 7.15pm

Festival Theatre Edinburgh
10, 11, 13 Jun 2020, 7.15pm
13 Jun 2020, 2.30pm

Hackney Empire, London

15,16,18 Jul 2020, 7.30pm

16, 18 Jul 2020, 2.30pm

 

Opera in Concert

Lammermuir Festival, St Mary’s Parish Church, Haddington | 20 Sep 2019, 7.30pm

Zanetto (Mascagni) and Susanna’s Secret (Wolf-Ferrari)

On sale 28 May 2019 at www.lammermuirfestival.co.uk

 

City Halls, Glasgow | 1 Dec 2019, 3pm

Iris (Mascagni)

 

Usher Hall, Edinburgh | 2 May 2020, 7.30pm

Cavalleria rusticana (Mascagni) and Zingari (Leoncavallo)

 

Theatre Royal Glasgow | 21 May 2020, 7.15pm

Festival Theatre Edinburgh | 12 Jun 2020, 7.15pm

Hackney Empire, London | 17 Jul 2020, 7.30pm

Utopia, Limited (Gilbert & Sullivan)

 

Opera Highlights

Autumn 2019

12 Sep to 19 Oct

Touring to Motherwell, Stirling, Stonehaven, Tain, Ullapool, Stornoway, Portree, Oban, Galashiels, Perth, Dunfermline, Thurso, Kirkwall, Ellon, Stranraer, Greenock & Musselburgh

 

Spring 2020

4 Feb to 14 Mar

Touring to Bathgate, Birnam, Markinch, Campbeltown, Bowmore, Arrochar, Bunessan, Arisaig, Beauly, Cumnock, Castle Douglas, Callander, Lerwick, Peebles, Fochabers, Alford & Rutherglen

 

Fox-tot! (Lliam Paterson)

Edinburgh Academy (Part of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe)

2 to 16 Aug 2019 (excluding Mondays), 10am and 11.30am

Tickets on sale now from https://tickets.edfringe.com/

Royal & Derngate, Northampton

27 Aug 2019, 2pm

28 Aug to 1 Sep 2019, 11am and 2pm

 

Touring Scotland Spring 2020

 

Scottish Opera Young Company – Merrily We Roll Along (Sondheim)

Glasgow

Spring 2020

 

Amadeus & The Bard

9 Sep to 12 Oct 2019

Touring to Earlston, Kirkcudbright, Annan, Cumnock, Ayr, Largs, Edinburgh, Glasgow & Paisley

 

Pop-up Opera

24 May to 20 July 2019

Tour includes Perth Festival of the Arts, Dunfermline, Dumfries & Galloway Arts Festival, Old Kilpatrick, Barrhead, Giffnock, Borders Book Festival, Dirleton, Callander, Cupar Arts EDEN, Aboyne & Deeside Festival, Haddington Show & Glasgow Canal Festival

 

Emerging Artists Recitals

University of St Andrews | Wed 20 Nov 2019

Royal Conservatoire of Scotland | Fri 10 Jan 2020

University of Glasgow | Thu 16 Jan 2020

 

Opera Unwrapped

 

Tosca

Glasgow |Mon 21 Oct 2019, 6pm

Inverness | Fri 8 Nov 2019, 6pm

Edinburgh | Mon 18 Nov 2019, 6pm

 

Nixon in China

Glasgow | Fri 21 Feb 2020, 6pm

Edinburgh | Fri 28 Feb 2020, 6pm

 

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Edinburgh | Wed 1 Apr 2020, 6pm

Glasgow | Wed 22 Apr 2020, 6pm

 

Pre-show talks

 

Tosca

Glasgow | Sat 26 Oct 2019, 6pm

Aberdeen |Sat 2 Nov 2019, 6pm

Inverness | Sat 9 Nov 2019, 6pm

Edinburgh | Sat 23 Nov 2019, 6pm

 

Nixon in China

Glasgow | Sat 22 Feb 2020, 6pm

Edinburgh | Sat 29 Feb 2020, 6pm

 

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Edinburgh | Sat 4 Apr 2020, 6pm

Glasgow | Sat 25 Apr 2020, 6pm

 

The Gondoliers
Glasgow | Sat 23 May 2020, 6pm

Aberdeen | Sat 30 May 2020, 6pm

Inverness |Sat 6 Jun 2020, 6pm

Edinburgh | Sat 13 Jun 2020, 6pm

London | Sat 18 Jul 2020, 6pm

 

Audio-described performances

 

Breaking the Waves

Edinburgh | Fri 23 Aug 2019, 7.15pm

 

Tosca

Glasgow | Sat 26 Oct 2019, 7.15pm

Aberdeen | Sat 2 Nov 2019, 7.15pm

Inverness | Sat 9 Nov 2019, 7.15pm

Edinburgh | Sun 17 Nov 2019, 3pm

 

Nixon in China

Glasgow | Sat 22 Feb 2020, 7.15pm

Edinburgh | Sat 29 Feb 2020, 7.15pm

 

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Edinburgh | Sat 4 Apr 2020,7.15pm

Glasgow | Sat 25 Apr 2020, 7.15pm

 

The Gondoliers

Glasgow | Sat 23 May 2020, 7.15pm

Aberdeen | Sat 30 May 2020, 7.15pm

Inverness | Sat 6 Jun 2020, 7.15pm

Edinburgh | Sat 13 Jun 2020, 2.30pm

 

Touch Tours start at 6pm for evening performances and 1.45pm for matinees.

(1.15pm for The Gondoliers on 13 Jun 2020).

Images: James Glossop